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Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

A. Elizabeth Cauble, Head

Professors Finnegan, Goe, Prins, and Schaeffer; Associate Professors Benson, Britton, Cauble, Dinkel, Gibbons, Riquelme, Ritterbush, and Williams; Research Associate Professor Logan; Assistant Professors Akard, Bemiller, Kulcsar, Middendorf, Spohn, Wesch, and Weyher; Instructors Barnett, Morgan, and Robinson; Emeriti Professors Dushkin, O'Brien, and Orbach, H. Ottenheimer, and M. Ottenheimer; Adjunct Associate Professor Roper; Adjunct Assistant Professors Adamchak and West; Adjunct Lecturer McBride.

785-532-6865

Fax: 785-532-6978

E-mal: socansw@k-state.edu

www.k-state.edu/sasw

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work offers three separate undergraduate majors: sociology, anthropology, and social work. The sociology major has two options: general sociology and criminology. The student may enroll in a BS or BA program in any of these majors.

Sociology

Sociology is the systematic study of social relationships at many different levels. For example, sociologists analyze small groups, complex organizations such as bureaucracies or factories, race/ethnic relations, gender relations, communities, nations, and even global social formations. The processes and behaviors sociologists examine include social interaction among individuals, institutional change, social policy formation, criminal and deviant behavior (and responses to such behavior), population growth and distribution, and social change and development.

The sociology program offers concentrations in general sociology and in criminology. General sociology provides a desirable background, as either a sole or combined major, for further professional training in law, city planning, public administration, hospital administration, and medicine, as well as for advanced graduate work in sociology or other social sciences. It also prepares students for a wide variety of careers that involve problem-solving and gathering, organizing, and analyzing information (i.e., data). Such careers may involve jobs ranging from sales and management to community services and government work.

The criminology concentration prepares students for careers in the criminal justice system (including law enforcement, correctional institutions, court services) as well as advanced study in law or graduate work in sociology, criminology, or criminal justice.

Students who major in sociology should refer to the general requirements for the BA or BS degree earlier in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. Sociology students who desire to teach in secondary schools should prepare for teacher certification with a major in sociology (see the College of Education section of this catalog).

All sociology majors are required to complete 6 hours of required outside courses. Students majoring in general sociology must also take 16 hours of required core courses and 15 hours of electives, with 9 of these 15 hours at the 500 level or above. Criminology students must complete 25 hours of required core courses and 9 hours of electives from two categories of ancillary courses.

Field experience/internship

During their senior year, qualified students* in the sociology/criminology program may participate in a professionally supervised internship in a criminal justice agency or other organization directly related to their career interests and aspirations. The aim of the supervised internship is to prepare beginning professionals for careers in a variety of settings related to their major. In special instances a junior in good academic standing may apply.

Credit hours ranging from 7 to 13 hours may be earned through the field experience option. Field experience hours may not substitute for core or elective requirements for the major.

*Qualifications include a minimum GPA of 2.5 and a letter of recommendation from a sociology faculty member.

General sociology major
Required outside courses (6 hours)
Three credit hours from among CIS 101, CIS 102, CIS 103, and CIS 104 (or demonstration of
equivalent competencies)3
STAT 330Elementary Statistics for the Social Sciences3
 
Core courses (16 hours)
SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
SOCIO 440Social Organization3
SOCIO 450Introduction to Social Interaction3
SOCIO 511Comparative Social Theories3
SOCIO 520Methods of Social Research I4
 
With advisor's permission, students may substitute Bureaucracy in Modern Societies (SOCIO 546) for Social Organization (SOCIO 440).
 
Electives
Fifteen hours of sociology electives are required, with at least 9 hours at the 500 level or above. SOCIO 567, 568, 569 may not be used to count toward these required elective hours.
 
Sociology: criminology option
Required outside courses (6 hours)
Three credit hours from among CIS 101, CIS 102, CIS 103, and CIS 104 (or demonstration of
equivalent competencies)3
STAT 330Elementary Statistics for the Social Sciences3
 
Core courses (25 hours)
SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
SOCIO 361Sociology of Criminal Justice System3
SOCIO 432Community Organization and Leadership3
SOCIO 440Social Organization3
SOCIO 450Introduction to Social Interaction3
SOCIO 511Comparative Social Theories3
SOCIO 520Methods of Social Research I4
SOCIO 561Criminology3
 
With advisor's permission, students may substitute SOCIO 531 or SOCIO 533 for SOCIO 432.
 
With advisor's permission, students may substitute SOCIO 546 for SOCIO 440.
 
Electives
Nine hours of electives are required with at least one course from each of the two categories (A and B).
 
A. Criminology electives
SOCIO 362Police and Society3
SOCIO 460Juvenile Delinquency3
SOCIO 580Corrections3
SOCIO 665Women and Crime3
 
B. Supporting electives
SOCIO 541Wealth, Power, and Privilege3
SOCIO 545Sociology of Women3
SOCIO 570Race and Ethnic Relations3
ANTH 526Law and Culture3
 

Anthropology

There are four major subfields of anthropology. Physical anthropology explores the origins of human life and the biological bases of culture. Archaeology examines the development of human cultures from prehistory and ancient civilizations to historic and modern times. Linguistic anthropology focuses on the languages and dialects of the world and the relationships of language to thought and culture. Cultural anthropology studies human behavior by surveying the range and variety of cultural traditions throughout the world. Some anthropology majors generalize, while others specialize in one or more of the subfields.

Entrance requirements for anthropology majors

Students interested in becoming anthropology majors should consult with faculty advisors. To be admitted as an anthropology major, a student must present evidence of having earned a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 based on a minimum of 12 credit hours earned at K-State. Pre-anthropology majors will be advised in the program.

Students transferring from other institutions with a GPA of 2.5 or higher will be accepted as majors when they have fulfilled the above requirements.

To graduate with a bachelor's degree in anthropology, a student must fulfill program requirements and have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher on all anthropology course work undertaken at Kansas State University.

Requirements

In addition to the general BA or BS requirements, anthropology majors take a minimum of 27 hours in anthropology as follows:

Introductions to the four subfields:
ANTH 200,Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
204, or 210
ANTH 220Introduction to Linguistic
Anthropology3
ANTH 260Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 280Introduction to Physical Anthropology3
Capstone course:
ANTH 602Anthropological Theory3
 
Four advanced electives distributed among three or more subfields: 12 hours at or above the 500 level.
 

Many anthropology students prepare for the variety of occupations concerned with human relations by combining anthropological study with other training, frequently by majoring in two fields. Each program of study is worked out individually by a student and his or her advisor. Interested students may obtain additional information from the Guide for Prospective Anthropology Majors, which is available in the department office.

Applied anthropology option

The applied anthropology option provides preparation and experience in the application of anthropology to professional settings outside the academic environment. The option is interdisciplinary, combining anthropology with other areas of training and expertise. While the option is flexible and accommodates a wide range of individual student interests, emphasis is on three major areas: developmental/action anthropology (domestic, international, community, and rural development); cultural resource management (historic preservation, parks and museums, and public archaeology); and complex organizations (agencies, foundations, business, administration, planning, and policy analysis).

The option builds on existing requirements for a bachelor's degree in anthropology. It adds 6 hours in anthropology and 18 hours in an area specialization outside the anthropology major. Double major, dual degree, pre- professional, and secondary major programs are particularly well suited for the option. Application to participate is normally made to the anthropology faculty during or before the junior year.

In addition to the existing 27 hours of major requirements for the bachelor's degree in anthropology, the following course is required:

ANTH 641Internship in Applied Anthropology3
or
ANTH 626Internship in Museology3
 

An area specialization consisting of 18 hours of course work outside anthropology with the following distribution:

Quantitative or technical skill development6
Subject matter courses12
 

The area specialization is a set of related courses focused on a particular interest, problem domain, or area of expertise taken from any other discipline or combination of disciplines. The quantitative and technical skill courses must be consistent with and supportive of the subject matter work. Students must demonstrate the coherence of their chosen area specialization and its fit with anthropology. The area specialization must be approved by the anthropology faculty.

Anthropology minor

A minor in anthropology is also available. Students are required to take a total of 18 hours, three of the four introductory courses to the field, i.e.:

ANTH 200, 204, or 210

ANTH 220

ANTH 260

ANTH 280

Plus three upper-level anthropology courses (for which the relevant introductory courses have been taken). At least two subfields must be represented.

Social work

Social work is concerned with the interaction between people and their social environments. Social workers help people deal with other people, cope with the many social and environmental forces that affect and control daily life, and help solve problems that inhibit growth and development.

The undergraduate social work program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education to educate entry-level, generalist social work practitioners. The social work major is of particular value to students who intend to pursue a career in social work upon graduation.

The bachelor's degree in social work is recognized as a beginning-level professional degree. Students graduating from the social work program are eligible for licensure as bachelor degree social workers in Kansas and numerous other states. No other bachelor's degree is recognized, or necessary, for such eligibility. Students who wish to pursue graduate studies in social work will be eligible for advanced standing in many master of social work programs throughout the United States.

The intervention tasks performed by social workers are derived from a common base of knowledge, values, and skills. Thus, social workers are uniquely qualified to provide resources, services, and opportunities to individuals, groups, families, organizations, and communities. Students are required to complete a field practice placement during their senior year to integrate classroom material with practice experience in a professional setting.

Students wishing to declare a major in social work may enroll directly in curriculum SOCWK. This is a provisional admission to the social work program. Students must complete SOCWK 010, SOCWK 260, SOCWK 510, and SOCWK 515 before formal evaluation and admission to the program can occur.

Formal evaluation occurs prior to admission to SOCWK 560 Social Work Practice I, taken during the junior year. At that time each student completes a personal statement and undergoes a formal review of academic and classroom performance by the program admissions committee. Students must have a 2.3 overall GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the core courses. Students successfully passing this review may enter the first course in the practice sequence, SOCWK 560.

Failure to meet and maintain the standards of the program will result in dismissal from the social work major. A student may be allowed to remain in the major on conditional or probationary status, but he or she must meet the standards of the program to complete the major.

For complete details on the admissions requirements and procedure, see the program admissions policy in the student handbook. Appeals of program faculty decisions may be made through established departmental procedures.

A student earning a BA or BS in social work must complete 124 hours (students who entered K-State before the fall of 2003 require only 120 hours for graduation) including SOCWK 010 Orientation to the Social Work Major; SOCWK 260 Introduction to Social Work; 44 additional hours of major courses; and 25 hours of tool and related courses.

Human behavior and the social environment content
SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
ANTH 200/204Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
PSYCH 110General Psychology3
FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
SOCWK 515Human Behavior and the Social
Environment3
SOCIO525Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
POLSC 110Introduction to Political Science3
or
POLSC 301Introduction to Political Thought3
ECON 110Principles of Microeconomics3
or
ECON 120Principles of Macroeconomics3
BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
 
Social work practice content
SOCWK 560Social Work Practice I3
SOCWK 561Social Work Practice II3
SOCWK 568Social Work Practice III3
SOCWK 570Social Work with Groups3
 
Research content
STAT 330Elementary Statistics for the Social
Sciences3
SOCWK 330Introduction to Social Work Research3
SOCWK 530Seminar in Applied Social Work Research3
SOCWK 550Field Practicum Preparation2
 
Social policy content
SOCWK 510Social Welfare as a Social Institution3
SOCWK 565Program and Policy Formulation and
Analysis3
 
Field practicum
SOCWK 562Field Experience10
 
Professional social work seminar
SOCWK 564Social Work Professional Seminar2
 

Sociology courses

University General Education courseSOCIO 211. Introduction to Sociology. (3) I, II, S. Development, structure, and functioning of human groups; social and cultural patterns; and the principal social processes.

University General Education courseSOCIO 214. Introduction to Sociology, Honors. (4) I, II. Development, structure, and functioning of human groups; societal and cultural patterns; the nature of sociological inquiry. Lecture, discussion, and independent study.

SOCIO 301. Topics in Sociology. (Var.) I, II, S. Supervised independent and/or interdisciplinary study projects. Pr.: SOCIO 211 and consent of instructor.

SOCIO 360. Social Problems. (3) I, II. Analysis of social problems such as drug use, crime, juvenile delinquency, mental illness, unemployment, and family instability. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 361. Sociology of the Criminal Justice System. (3) I, II. An examination of the major components in the American criminal justice system and how these reflect and are affected by norms and changes in our society. Special emphasis is placed on issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class within criminal justice. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 362. Police and Society. (3) Examines in detail the policing function in society and the role police play in the criminal justice process. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

University General Education courseSOCIO 363. Global Problems. (3) II. Analysis of globalization and contemporary social problems around the world. Emphasis on non-Western, low-income countries. Examines food and hunger, global warming, debt crisis, democratization, ethnic conflict, and structures of economic and political inequality.

University General Education courseSOCIO 399. Honors Seminar in Sociology. (1-3) On sufficient demand. Readings and discussion of selected topics. Open to nonmajors in the honors program.

SOCIO 432. Community Organization and Leadership. (3) I. The analysis of community organization and change in American communities, with special emphasis on nonmetropolitan places. Issues include the analysis of internal community organizational ties, the interaction between the local community and its external environment, and the exploration of various methods affecting community development and social change within communities. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 435. Sport and Contemporary Society. (3) II. An analysis of sport and its role in contemporary society. Course creates a greater awareness of the social significance of sport in society and fosters the capacity to use critical thinking in the analysis of significant sport issues. Same as KIN 435. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 440. Social Organization. (3) II. Principles and processes of the organization and structure of human societies. Examines how people create social institutions and how these organizations and structures shape human relations and experience. Analysis of capitalism and other forms of social organization. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 450. Introduction to Social Interaction. (3) I. A survey of theories of social interaction and social psychology with special attention to research on principles of interpersonal relations in social situations, group formation, maintenance, and change. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 460. Juvenile Delinquency. (3) I, II, S. Nature, extent, and causes of delinquency; characteristics of delinquents; means of prevention and treatment. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) On sufficient demand. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

SOCIO 500. Sociological Perspectives on Contemporary Issues. (Var.) I, II, S. Analysis of a selected topic of contemporary interest. Topics vary from semester to semester and might include: impact of public policy on rural life; white collar crime; student-athlete education; social change in the Third World. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 501. Proficiency Development. (1-3) Integrative review of sociological concepts and skills under faculty supervision. For single students or groups of students. Not applicable to major field requirements. Not repeatable. For undergraduate credit only. Pr.: Consent of instructor and superior performance in relevant course.

SOCIO 504. Political Sociology. (3) II, in even years. An introduction to the principles of political sociology. Processes of political socialization, participation within and outside established organizational channels, recruitment of elites, communication and influence, power, decision making, and policy outputs. Data are presented from a cross-national perspective. Same as POLSC 504. Pr.: SOCIO 211, POLSC 110.

SOCIO 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I. in even years. Interdisciplinary survey of the development of civilizations in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan; including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as GEOG 505, ANTH 505, ECON 505, HIST 505, POLSC 505.

SOCIO 507. Comparative Political Sociology. (3) A survey of the socioeconomic and political dimensions of development in regions such as Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Given the diversity of these regions, the course takes a comparative perspective. Special attention is given to authoritarianism and democratization, U.S. foreign policy, globalization and privatization, free trade, debt crisis, inequality, and social movements. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

University General Education courseSOCIO 510. Social Welfare as a Social Institution. (3) I, II. The development and present status of social welfare in meeting changing human needs and the requirements in other parts of our social system; the analysis of present-day philosophy and functions of social welfare. Same as SOCWK 510. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 511. Comparative Social Theories. (3) I, II. A systematic survey of major theoretical approaches in sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and other classical theorists are examined, along with selections from major contemporary perspectives such as functionalism, symbolic interactionism, structuralism, critical theory, and feminist theory. Current debates over structure versus agency, postmodernism, and other controversies are considered. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 520. Methods of Social Research I. (4) I, II. Treatment of the logic and procedures involved in the formulation of a research problem and the difficulties encountered in conducting research. Examines problems of explanation and prediction, the process of inquiry, elements of the scientific method, the design of research, and analysis in the social sciences. Pr.: SOCIO 211, STAT 330 or equiv. To include 1 credit hour of lab and field research experience.

SOCIO 522. Sociological Field Methods. (3) I, II. Introduction to field/qualitative methods. Includes collection and analysis of data using techniques such as interviewing, observation, and unobtrusive measures. Taking field notes, report writing, and ethical issues are also stressed. Pr.: SOCIO 520.

SOCIO 531. Urban Sociology. (3) II. Growth, development, and structure of the city as explained by social, economic, and political factors; social groups (e.g. race/ethnic groups, social classes) in cities; urban problems and various approaches to their solution. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

University General Education courseSOCIO 533. Rural Sociology. (3) I. Social change and social structure of rural regions and rural communities. Change in agriculture structure, rural demographic shifts, changes in economic base of rural communities in the United States and elsewhere in relation to changing political economy of the world-system. Possible specific topics include rural community revitalization, women in agriculture, peasants, off-farm work, rural policy, food policy. Pr.: SOCIO 211 or consent of instructor.

SOCIO 535. Population Dynamics. (3) II, in odd years. World population trends and their implications for economic development, public policy, and social and cultural change. The interaction of fertility, mortality, and migration with the size, distribution, and structure of populations in nations and world regions. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 536. Environmental Sociology. (3) II, in even years. The interrelations among human societies, social institutions, and the biophysical environment. Emphasis on the reciprocal links among technological change, economic structure, and the ecological basis of human societies. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 541. Wealth, Power, and Privilege. (3) II. Analysis of social inequality, particularly within the contemporary U.S. Competing explanations for unequal wealth, status, power, etc. Emphasis on explanations related to class, occupational structure, gender, and ethnicity. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 545. The Sociology of Women. (3). Examines patterns of gender in contemporary society and corresponding experiences of women. The course emphasizes both interactional and structural approaches and provides an overview of theoretical work in the field. Particular attention is paid to how gender interacts with ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 546. Bureaucracy in Modern Societies. (3) I. The nature and types of bureaucratic organizations in modern societies. Selected aspects of their internal structure, such as peer group and hierarchical relations in organizations, processes of communication, management, and impersonal mechanisms of control. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 561. Criminology. (3) I, II. Addresses basic concepts, theories, and research methods used in the study of crime, with an emphasis on critical perspectives on crime as a social phenomenon. The course provides an overview of the nature and extent of major categories of crime as well as the integration of current issues dealing with crime. Pr.: SOCIO 361 or 511.

University General Education courseSOCIO 562. Social Construction of Serial Murder. (3) II. The course critically examines the social construction of serial murder as a phenomenon that has long existed but only recently has been polarized as a concern of the criminal justice system and the public in general. The objective of the course is to synthesize historical and social scientific analysis of serial murder, assess public and media debates centered on both offenders and victims, and evaluate the portrayal of serial murder in contemporary literature and film.

SOCIO 565. Program and Policy Formulation and Analysis. (3) I, II. Examination of policies and programs developed to cope with various social problems. Emphasis will be on analysis of existing programs and policies and the formulation of alternative policies. Attention will be given to policy change through legislative action. Same as SOCWK 565. Pr.: SOCIO 510.

SOCIO 567. Pre-Internship Orientation. (1) I, II. This course prepares students for internship placements. Resumes are written, interview procedures discussed, agency interviews conducted, internships selected, and agency orientation completed. Pr.: SOCIO 520

SOCIO 568. Criminology and Sociology Internship. (6-9) I, II, S. Supervised field experience in various agencies within the criminal justice system or other public or private organizations in areas involving applied sociological analysis or practice. Criminology majors wishing to pursue careers in the field of criminal justice are strongly encouraged to complete an internship. General sociology students may take this course under the direction of a faculty member who agrees to serve as their internship advisor. Does not fulfill sociology or criminology elective requirements. Must be taken concurrently with SOCIO 569. Pr.: SOCIO 567.

SOCIO 569. Criminology and Sociology Professional Seminar. (3) I, II, S. Integrates field experience and everyday practices with relevant bodies of sociological and criminological theory and research. Must be taken concurrently with SOCIO 568. Pr.: SOCIO 567.

SOCIO 570. Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S.A. (3) I, II. This survey of racial and ethnic relations focuses on discrimination and conflict now as well as on background factors of the past to enlarge understanding of dominant and minority groups. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 580. Corrections. (3) I, II. The historical development and current status of the correctional system. Major institutional components: jails, prisons, probation, parole and other forms of community corrections. Modern issues such as offender and victim rights and electronic monitoring. Pr.: SOCIO 561.

SOCIO 618. Religion in Culture. (3) II, in odd years. The nature of religion and its manifestations in different cultural systems. Same as ANTH 618. Pr.: ANTH 200 or SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 633. Gender, Power, and International Development. (3) On sufficient demand. Examination of various models of development and their impact on various roles of women and men in various cultures. Emphasis upon Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Comparisons of public, service, and economic sectors, including agriculture, marketing, and industry. Examination of policy issues. Pr.: SOCIO 211 or ANTH 200 or ANTH 204 or ANTH 210 and 3 additional hours in sociology or cultural anthropology. Same as ANTH 633.

SOCIO 635. The Socioeconomic and Environmental Impacts of NAFTA. (3) Intersession only. The course examines the economic and social restructuring of North America now underway via continental integration, placing this process in its historical context and examining the sectorally and geographically specific impacts of this process precipitated by the North American Free Trade Agreement.

SOCIO 640. Sociology of the Family. (3) I. Origin and development of marriage customs and systems of family organizations; the preparation for family life under present conditions. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 643. Sociology of Religion. (3) I. On sufficient demand. The role of religion as an institution in American society. An assessment of the functions of religion and an exploration of contemporary trends and movements, including information on traditional denominations and emerging sects and cults. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 647. Sociology of Work. (3). Analysis of the world of work, both paid and unpaid. Examines changes that affect the organization of work and the distribution of income, and examines how change alters class, gender, and ethnic relations. Pr.: SOCIO 211 and junior standing.

University General Education courseSOCIO 665. Women and Crime I. (3). Nature and extent of criminal offending among women and women offenders' interactions with legal and criminal justice systems; women's victimization, including rape and intimate violence; women workers in the criminal justice system, specifically in law, policing, and prison work. Pr.: SOCIO 561 or 545 or other women's studies course at the 500-level or above.

University General Education courseSOCIO 670. Diversity and Social Interaction in the Workplace. (3) Intersession. Examines changes in the world of work; examines various contexts of work, such as business, the professions, education, and home; analyzes the social organization of work, both in terms of formal arrangements—such as authority and hierachy—and in terms of informal structure, such as gender, race, class, and other categories of social difference; provides hands-on experience in dealing with interpersonal relations, management styles, communication, diversity issues, and conflict and stress management. Pr.: 6 hours of social science.

SOCIO 738. Inter-American Migration. (3) I, in odd years. Analyzes the migratory experiences of Latin American and Caribbean peoples to the United States within their socioeconomic, cultural, political and historical contexts. Introduces students to the current theoretical debate on migration and the construction of U.S. immigration policies. Examines the ways in which these policies shape migrant flows to the U.S., the incorporation and community formation of immigrants, and the impacts of such communities on the development of U.S. society. Pr.: SOCIO 535 or consent of instructor.

SOCIO 742. Society and Change in South Asia. (3) II, in even years. Examines recent studies of family and community, population, mobility, urbanization, and modernization in the India-Pakistan region, with focus on social change. Pr.: SOCIO 211 or ANTH 200 and either a 500-level course in South Asian studies or one in social change and development.

SOCIO 744. Social Gerontology: An Introduction to the Sociology of Aging. (3) II. Analysis of the phenomenon of human aging in its individual, social, and cultural aspects with special attention to the problems of aging populations in Western societies. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

Anthropology courses

ANTH 200. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3) I, II S. Introduction to ethnology and ethnography; analysis and comparison of technological, social, and religious characteristics of cultural systems. Not available for credit to students who have credit in ANTH 204.

University General Education courseANTH 204. A General Education Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to ethnology and ethnography; analysis and comparison of technological, social, and religious characteristics of cultural systems. Not available for credit to students who have credit in ANTH 200.

ANTH 210. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Honors. (4) On sufficient demand. Introduction to basic ethnology and ethnography; technological, social, and religious characteristics of cultural systems; discussion and independent study.

ANTH 220. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. (3) II. Language as a part of human behavior: its origins, uses and abuses, and ways of defining reality. Basic descriptive and ethnosemantic skills used by anthropologists to learn languages in the field.

ANTH 260. Introduction to Archaeology. (3) I, II. Brief introduction to the field of anthropological archaeology. General survey of world prehistory revealing major cultural changes from the development of early foraging societies through the rise of agricultural and complex communities.

ANTH 280. Introduction to Physical Anthropology. (3) I, II (odd years only). History of research; principles of evolution and human genetics; primate relations of hominids; fossil evidence of the evolution of hominids; the study of modern race; culture and evolution.

ANTH 281. Introduction to Physical Anthropology Laboratory. (1) I, II (odd years only). Laboratory investigation of human skeletal anatomy, human genetics, primate comparative anatomy, fossil hominid morphology, and comparative evolution of hominid types. Two hours lab a week. Pr.: ANTH 280 or conc. enrollment.

University General Education courseANTH 399. Honors Seminar in Anthropology. (1-3) On sufficient demand. Readings and discussion of selected topics. Open to nonmajors in the honors program.

ANTH 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) On sufficient demand. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

ANTH 501. Proficiency Development. (0-3) I, II. Integrative review of anthropological concepts and skills under faculty supervision. For single students or groups of students. Not applicable to major field requirements. Not repeatable. For undergraduate credit only. Pr.: Consent of instructor and superior performance in relevant course.

University General Education courseANTH 503. Archaeological Fact or Fiction. (3) I,. Evaluation of popular beliefs about the human past through the application of critical thinking skills. Topics include ancient North American inscriptions, Vikings in the Americas, the moundbuilder myth, lost civilizations, and advanced prehistoric technology. Pr.: ANTH 260 or equiv.

University General Education courseANTH 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey of the development of civilizations in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan; geography, philosophy, social, economic, and political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ECON 505, GEOG 505, HIST 505, POLSC 505, SOCIO 505.

ANTH 508. Male and Female: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. (3) I or II. Gender roles and male-female relationships in the world's cultures. Stresses gender-role complementarity within the anthropological framework of cultural relativism. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 510. Kinship and Marriage in Cross-Cultural Perspective. (3) II. Systems of family, marriage, descent, and sex tabus in cross-cultural perspective. Pr.: ANTH 200 or 204 or 210, or SOCIO 211.

ANTH 511. Cultural Ecology and Economy. (3) I or II. Cultural ecology and organization in the world's cultures. Discussion of environment and culture, exchange and display, money, trade and markets, and economic development and social change in selected societies. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

ANTH 512. Political Anthropology. (3) I or II. Ethnological approaches to politics in societies around the world. Structural-functional, evolutionary, and conflict theories. A comparison of the political systems of small-scale and complex societies: political modernization. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

ANTH 514. Language and Culture. (3) I, II. Study of language and dialect as aspects of social and ethnic group identities. Emphasis on analysis of conversational style in diverse cultural settings. Research project to be determined according to student interests. Pr.: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 515. Creativity and Culture. (3) I, in even years. How ethnologists view the expressive and creative aspects of culture. A cross-cultural survey of the verbal, visual, and performing arts. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 516. Ethnomusicology. (3) I, in odd years. Ethnic, popular, and traditional musics from around the world. The course samples a wide range of stylistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, Europe, and the Americas. Emphasis is on understanding musical style in cultural context. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 517. African American Music and Culture. (3) II, in even years. Continuity and tradition in the musical styles and cultural patterns of African Americans in the United States, the Caribbean, and South America. Music, art, religion, social organization, from African roots to modern forms. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 519. Applied Anthropology. (3) I or II. Application of anthropological principles and insights to programs of planned change, cultural innovation, and contemporary problems. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 520. Research Seminar. (Var.) On sufficient demand. Intensive exploration of anthropological problems for both majors and nonmajors of sufficient background. High levels of individual participation. Pr.: 9 hours of anthropology.

ANTH 522. Special Topics in Anthropology. (1-4) On sufficient demand. Variable topics within cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, or physical anthropology. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

University General Education courseANTH 524. Immigrant America. (3) I. Discussion of post-1965 immigration to the United States with a focus on Asian and Latino newcomers. Immigrant adaptation, economic strategies and the reinterpretation of cultural identity. Implications for American society. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 526. Law and Culture. (3) II. Law in cross-cultural perspective, including analysis of important law and culture issues in U.S. society. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210 or SOCIO 211 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 533. Kansas Archaeology. (3) I. Study of native cultures of Kansas and the central Plains region based on archaeological and ethnohistoric research. Pr.: ANTH 260.

ANTH 536. African American Cultures. (3) On sufficient demand. Description and comparison of African-derived cultural patterns in the Americas, stressing culture contact and acculturation, retention and syncretism, social and economic organization, religion, language, the arts. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 545. Cultures of India and Pakistan. (3) On sufficient demand. Cultural survey of the contemporary tribes and Hindu caste communities in their historical and geographical context, followed by a more intense analysis of selected Indian and Pakistani village case studies stressing indigenous economic, social, political, and religious structures. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 550. Cultures of Africa. (3) On sufficient demand. Family life, subsistence patterns, exchange systems, languages, religions, and development of the peoples of Africa. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210

ANTH 570. North American Archaeology. (3) II, in odd years. The prehistoric of native cultures of North America explored through the archaeological record from the peopling of the continent, to the spread of agriculture and village life, up to contact period. Pr.: ANTH 260.

ANTH 602. Anthropological Theory. (3) I . Review and integration of the major theoretical approaches in the principal branches of anthropology. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ANTH 604. Culture and Personality. (3) I or II. Anthropological contributions to personality study; cross-cultural comparisons of personality types, means of personality formation in different cultures; cultural change and personality. Pr.: Three hours of anthropology.

ANTH 618. Religion in Culture. (3) I. The nature of religion in different cultural systems. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210 or SOCIO 211 or consent of instructor. Same as SOCIO 618.

ANTH 625. Independent Reading and Research in Anthropology. (1-3) I, II. Guided reading and research on a specific anthropological topic of student interest, leading to preparation of a research paper. Topic and credit to be arranged. Pr.: Three hours of anthropology and consent of instructor.

ANTH 626. Internship in Museology. (3) I, II, S. Practical professional museum experience of at least four weeks full time or 150 hours part time in the processing of collections, conservation, cataloging, archive and library maintenance, and/or the planning and preparation of exhibits. Open to anthropology majors only. May be repeated once for credit if at a different type of museum. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, 210, 260, or 280.

ANTH 630. North American Indians. (3) II, in even years. Description and comparison of native cultures of Canada and the United States; culture contact and change among surviving groups. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, 210, or 260.

ANTH 633. Gender, Power, and International Development. (3) On sufficient demand. Examination of various models of development and their impact on various roles of women and men in various cultures. Emphasis upon Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Comparisons of public, service, and economic sectors, including agriculture, marketing, and industry. Examination of policy issues. Pr.: SOCIO 211 or ANTH 200 or 204 or 210 and 3 additional hours in sociology or cultural anthropology. Same as SOCIO 633.

ANTH 634. South American Indians. (3) II, in odd years. A survey of the nature and variability of the original cultures of Latin America. Analysis of sample cultures, stressing economic, social, political, and religious structures. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, 210, or 260.

ANTH 641. Internship in Applied Anthropology. (3) I, II, S. Supervised field experience of at least three weeks full time or 150 hours part time with an organization or institution in the application of anthropological approaches to problem solving and working in a professional setting. Emphasis is on anthropological skills in relation to the objectives and operations of an institution. Open to anthropology majors only. May be repeated once for credit. Pr.: ANTH 519 and junior standing and consent of program coordinator.

ANTH 673. Mesoamerican Archaeology. (3) II, in odd years. Early foraging societies, the beginnings of agriculture; the rise of civilization; the classic empires of the Maya, Aztec, Tarascans, and their neighbors; relationships with the United States. Pr.: ANTH 260.

ANTH 676. Old World Archaeology. (3) II, in even years. Study of the evolution of human cultures in Africa, Europe, and Asia from its Paleolithic origins and neolithic developments to the earliest civilizations. Artifacts, art, architecture, and archaeological sites are investigated to interpret changes in technology, economy, and culture. Pr.: ANTH 260.

ANTH 678. Archeological Laboratory Methods. (3) I, II. Hands-on instruction in and application of professional principles of processing, analyzing, and curating artifacts and related archeological materials. Pr.: ANTH 260 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 679. Archaeological Field Methods. (3) I, on sufficient demand. Archaeological site survey, site excavation, and laboratory analysis of sites and artifacts from the Manhattan, Kansas region. Field work on Saturday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., while weather permits, laboratory work thereafter. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 680. Survey of Forensic Sciences. (3) I. Anthropological survey of the predominantly biological areas of forensic science, their methods and techniques, as they pertain to the application of that science to the purpose of the law. Particular emphasis will be given to perspectives about the science itself, its application to anthropology, and the unique ways in which that science may be used by the law. Pr.: A life science with laboratory requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences or consent of the instructor.

ANTH 684. Forensic Medicine and the Investigation of Death. (2-3) Intersession only. Survey of the medical, biological, cultural, and support areas of the investigation of death in various cultural settings. Emphasis on the interaction of culture and biology in the investigative process. Pr.: Life or physical science with laboratory, or consent of instructor. Does not apply towards major or minor requirements

ANTH 685. Race and Culture. (3) On demand. The biological meaning of race; the interrelationships of biological and cultural traits in human evolution; processes of racial formation of man; methods of classifying human races; cultural inheritance; the distinction of race, culture, personality, and intelligence; a review of modern racism; race as an evolutionary episode. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, 210, or 280.

ANTH 688. Paleoanthropology. (3) II, in odd years. Human origins and evolution as indicated by fossil evidence; interpretation of man-apes, Pithecanthropus, Neanderthal, Cro-Magnon, and other major fossil groups within the context of evolutionary theory, primate comparisons, and cultural evolution. Pr.: ANTH 200 or 280 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 691. Primatology. (3) I, on demand. Survey of the primate order including considerations of evolution, morphology, and behavior. Particular emphasis will be given to developing perspectives about the origin and evolution of hominids in the context of the primate order. Pr.: ANTH 280 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 694. Osteology. (3) II, in even years. Detailed study of human skeleton, with special attention to health and demographic conditions in prehistoric cultures and the evaluation of physical characteristics and genetic relationships of prehistoric populations. Pr.: ANTH 280 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 695. Laboratory in Osteology. (1) II, in even years. Laboratory demonstration and exercise in working with skeletal material for analysis of sex, age, stature, and race. Complete metric and nonmetric analysis with consideration given to paleodemography, paleopathology, in situ analysis and excavation, and preservation. Written reports on bone material remains will be necessary. Pr.: ANTH 694 or conc. enrollment.

ANTH 697. Seminar in Osteology. (2) II, in odd years and on demand. Analysis of human and nonhuman skeletal remains including age, sex, stature, race, anomalities, pathologies, trauma, metric and nonmetric traits, cause of death, and time since death. This course allows greater breadth and depth of osteological analysis than either ANTH 694 or 695, and allows for more concentration on individual methods and techniques and case studies. Pr.: ANTH 694 and 695.

ANTH 730. Field and Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology. (1-9) S. Participation in archaeological excavations; techniques, methods, and procedures in a field research situation. The laboratory work of cleaning, cataloging, analyzing, and preliminary report preparation of materials recovered. May be repeated once if the areas or problems involved are different. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 792. Field Methods in Linguistics. (3) On sufficient demand. Techniques of collecting and analyzing linguistic data in the field. Work with language consultants in class, on languages such as Swahili. Pr.: ANTH 220 or LING280 or LING600. Same as LING792 and LG 792.

Social work courses

SOCWK 010. Introduction to the Social Work Major. (0) I, II. Information for new social work majors on the requirements, content, and objectives of the course sequences, and on the formal admissions process; and emphasizes the importance of the liberal arts foundation as the basis for the professional content; and reviews the CSWE Curriculum Policy Statement plus the NASW Code of Ethics.

SOCWK 260. Introduction to Social Work. (3) I, II. An introduction to the profession of social work and the various fields of social service by observing, experiencing, and analyzing social work and its place in society. An opportunity for the student to test social work as a possible career choice. Restricted to freshmen, sophomores, first-semester transfer students and social work majors.

SOCWK 310. Topics in Social Work. (1-3) I, II. Supervised independent study projects. Pr.: Consent of the instructor.

SOCWK 330. Introduction to Social Work Research. (3) II. First of two research courses. Emphasis on social work research methodology. Examines the ethics and processes of research. Social work majors only. Recommend conc. enrollment in STAT 330. Pr.: SOCWK 260.

SOCWK 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) On sufficient demand. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

SOCWK 501. Proficiency Development. (1-3) Integrative review of social work concepts and skills under faculty supervision. For single students or groups of students. Not applicable to major field requirements. Not repeatable. Pr.: Consent of instructor and superior performance in relevant course.

University General Education courseSOCWK 510. Social Welfare as a Social Institution. (3) I, II. The development and present status of social welfare in meeting changing human needs and the requirements in other parts of our social system; the analysis of present-day philosophy and the functions of social welfare. Same as SOCIO 510. Pr.: One course in each of the following areas: sociology, economics, and political science.

SOCWK 515. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. (3) I, II. An introduction to the relationship among biological, social, psychological, and cultural systems as they affect or are affected by human behavior as it relates to social world models of practice. Emphasis on social systems understanding of human development. Pr.: FSHS 110, SOCWK 260, BIOL 198, PSYCH 110, SOCIO 211, and ANTH 200.

SOCWK 525. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II. (3) I, II. Continuation of SOCWK 515, with a focus on large systems (organizations and communities). Social systems and ecological perspectives as a framework for understanding macrosystems. Structure and function of large systems and their impact on people. Institutional racism and other forms of institutional discrimination, and the importance of recognizing the functions and the effects of racial, ethnic, and other forms of community diversity. Pr.: SOCWK 515. Must be taken conc. with SOCWK 560.

SOCWK 530. Seminar in Applied Social Work Research. (3) I. Second of two research methods courses. Emphasis on designing and conducting social work research projects appropriate for baccalaureate social work practice. Attention given to research strategies for the evaluation of social work practice. Social work majors only. Pr.: SOCWK 330 and STAT 330.

SOCWK 543. Women's Mental Health Issues. (3) II. Investigates prevalent women's mental health issues such as the incidence of depression/anxiety, eating disorders, sexuality, relationship concerns. Also covers the efficacy of traditional treatment modalities and newer therapies that target women's unique mental health needs, such as feminist or nonsexist therapies. Pr.: One course in women's studies, social work, psychology, or family therapy.

SOCWK 550. Field Practicum Preparation. (2) I, II. Social work majors take this course in the semester before enrollment in SOCWK 562 Field Experience. The student is expected to prepare a research proposal which describes research that will be completed in the field practicum setting. In addition, the student is expected to complete 50 hours of volunteer time in the assigned field practicum setting. Pr.: Senior standing and instructor permission. Social work majors only.

SOCWK 560. Social Work Practice I. (3) I, II. Introduction to the basic helping skills and techniques common to social work practice. The social systems perspective is used to guide the development of a problem-solving methodology with attention to information gathering, assessment, and problem identification. Values clarification and self-awareness are emphasized and the skills needed for intervention, termination, and evaluation are introduced. Pr.: SOCWK 260, 510, and 515; junior standing and permission of the instructor. Social work majors only.

SOCWK 561. Social Work Practice II. (3) I, II. Continuation of SOCWK 560 with emphasis on skill development in intervention techniques, and practice evaluation from a social systems perspective. A variety of intervention strategies and techniques is presented with emphasis on the development of a social work frame of reference. Pr.: SOCWK 560 and senior standing and permission of the instructor.

SOCWK 562. Field Experience. (10) II, S. Supervised field experience in community agencies and programs as a practical application of social work knowledge and skills gained from major course work. Emphasis on direct work with clients, whether individuals, groups, or communities. Seminars make use of student's experiences to analyze social work theory and practice. Pr.: SOCWK 515, 550, 561; senior standing; social work majors only; permission of the instructor.

SOCWK 563. The Practice of Social Work in Rural Areas. (3) On sufficient demand. A review of characteristics and social problems of rural areas. The development of practice competency in social work roles and skills necessary for rural practice. Pr.: SOCWK 560.

SOCWK 564. Social Work Professional Seminar. (2) II, S. A review of various theories in the behavioral sciences which influence the practice of social work. Primary focus of the course is on the use of these theories in implementing change in various client systems. Pr.: To be taken conc. with SOCWK 562. Social work majors only.

SOCWK 565. Program and Policy Formulation and Analysis. (3) I, II. Examination of policies and programs developed to cope with various social problems. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of existing programs and policies and the formulation of alternative policies. Attention will be given to policy change through organizational and legislative action. Same as SOCIO 565. Pr.: SOCWK 510; one course in each of the following areas: sociology, economics, and political science; and one course in social science research methods.

SOCWK 566. Social Work in Aging Services. (3) Social work practice course focusing attention on working with institutionalized and noninstitutionalized elderly. Role of the social worker is explored in the context of physical, psychological, social, and economic aspects of aging. Skills in working with elderly are emphasized through classroom and direct practice in social work or in gerontology. Pr.: Three course hours in social work or gerontology.

SOCWK 568. Social Work Practice III. (2) I, II. Continuation of social work practice sequence with focus on skills development for macro-level social work practice. Community and organization intervention strategies are presented with emphasis on the development of a social work frame of reference. Taken conc. with SOCWK 561. Pr.: SOCWK 560; senior standing; open to social work majors only.

SOCWK 570. Social Work with Groups. (3) I. Taken concurrently with SOCWK 560 or 561. Students work in small groups to learn how to develop and facilitate task and treatment groups using social work methods. Instructor permission required.

University General Education courseSOCWK 580. Women's Perspectives on Peace and War. (2-3) Intersession only. This course will consider the issue of the participation of women in opposition to war and weapons of war and advocacy for peaceful resolution of conflict. Readings and discussions will focus on four areas: (1) historical and contemporary women's peace movements; (2) the influence of a male-dominated societal structure on the use of violence and militarism as a means of resolving conflict; (3) the question of whether or not women are naturally more inclined to be peaceful; and (4) the activities, thoughts, and works of individual women in their quest for peace, within themselves, and in the world.

SOCWK 610. Topics in Social Work. (1-3) Supervised independent study projects. Pr.: SOCWK 260 plus 6 hours of behavioral science foundation courses and consent of instructor.