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Kansas State University

Secondary Majors

K-State offers secondary majors in American ethnic studies, gerontology, international studies, Latin American studies, and natural resources and environmental sciences. Open to students in all colleges, these secondary majors are designed to be taken concurrently with a primary major. Most programs of study will allow students to take both a primary and a secondary major within the normal four-year program, especially because courses applied toward the secondary major may also satisfy requirements for general education or restricted electives.

Program requirements follow a common pattern. Each includes two or more of the following features: an interdisciplinary introductory course (which might also satisfy distribution requirements); a list of electives from which students choose about 18 hours; and an interdisciplinary senior seminar featuring supervised independent study.

Each program has a supervisory committee and a director to whom students may refer for advising.

American Ethnic Studies

Juanita McGowan, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: blessing@ksu.edu
www.ksu.edu/AMETH/

Professors Cochran, Finnegan, McElroy, H. Ottenheimer, Prins, and Suleiman; Associate Professors Armagost, D. Benson, J. Benson, Davy, Exdell, Griffin, Goins, Janette, McGowan, A. Pigno, Rodgers, Royce, Sherow, Smith, Verschelden, Webb, and Wigfall; Emeritus Boyer, Fedder, and R. Taylor.

The American ethnic studies program primarily focuses on African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans, but includes the study of other ethnic groups in the United States as well. The courses in the program meet the educational and career needs of students by preparing them to function intellectually in a multiethnic, multicultural nation and world.

Students are encouraged to enroll in American ethnic studies courses whether or not they select the option of a secondary major or minor in American ethnic studies.

Secondary major

Students completing 24 semester hours of course work in a minimum of two departments may earn a secondary major in American ethnic studies. The director assists and advises secondary majors in planning appropriate schedules.

Course requirements
Foundation courses
AMETH 160Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3
ANTH 200Introduction to Cultural
or ANTH 210Anthropology3
Area courses
Fifteen hours of area courses are required. The distribution of area courses must include at least two American ethnic groups and at least one general/comparative course. No course can be used to fulfill more than one major requirement.
 
A. African American, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino American, and Native American ethnic groups of the United States9
B. Background/ancestral cultures of category A3
C. Any United States ethnic group or the ancestral culture of a United States ethnic group3
 
Capstone course
AMETH 499Senior Research Project in American Ethnic Studies3
 
Total credits required24
 
Minor

Students completing 15 semester hours of course work in a minimum of two departments may earn a minor in American ethnic studies. Students pursuing a minor are advised in the American ethnic studies office.

Course requirements for the minor
AMETH 160Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3
ANTH 200Introduction to Cultural
or ANTH 210Anthropology3
American ethnic studies electives in category A9
as described in the catalog and the AMETH handbook
 
Total credits15
 
Interdisciplinary courses

University General Education courseAMETH 160. Introduction to American Ethnic Studies. (3) I, II. This course introduces students to the major concepts related to ethnicity and to some of the major American ethnic groups.

AMETH 460. Independent Reading and Research in American Ethnic Studies. (1-3) I, II, S. Guided reading and research on a specific topic of student interest, leading to preparation of a research paper or creative work. Topic and credit to be arranged. Pr.: AMETH 160, at least one other American ethnic studies course and permission of instructor.

AMETH 499. Senior Research Project in American Ethnic Studies. (3) I, II, S. Guided research in American ethnic studies. Students prepare a research paper on a relevant subject of their choice. Each student is responsible for arranging to work with a member of the American ethnic studies faculty. Pr.: AMETH 160.

AMETH 501. Recitation Leadership. (0-3) I, II. Integrative review of concepts in American ethnic studies under faculty supervision. Preparation for leading discussions, workshops and reviews in American ethnic studies. Students attend two lecture sessions per week concurrent with AMETH 160, one additional seminar session focused on planning and preparation for recitations, and are responsible for leading discussions in one or more recitation sections in AMETH 160 per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

AMETH 560. Topics in American Ethnic Studies. (1-4) I, II. Selected topics of special interest in American ethnic studies. Repeatable with change of topic. Pr.: AMETH 160.

AMETH 660. Independent Reading and Research in American Ethnic Studies. (1-3) I, II, S. Advanced reading and research on a specific topic of student interest, leading to preparation of a research paper or creative work. Topic and credit to be arranged. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing and permission of instructor.

Area courses

A. African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American

General

EDCEP886 Multicultural Counseling

EDCIP455 Teaching in a Multi-Cultural Society

EDCIP733 Curriculum Materials for Ethnic Diversity

EDCIP730 Education of the Disadvantaged

ENGL 655 Readings in American Ethnic Literature

MC530 Media, Race, and Social Change

PSYCH 557 Psychology of Ethnic Humor

SOCIO 570 Race and Ethnic Relations in the U.S.A.

THTRE 672 American Ethnic Theatre

African American

ANTH 517 African American Music and Culture

ANTH 536 African American Cultures

ENGL 395 Topics: Contemporary Afro-American

Fiction

ENGL 399 Topics in Contemporary African

American Literature

FSHS 652 Black Families

HIST 529 Civil War and Reconstruction

HIST 539 African American History

HIST 554 History of the South

MUSIC 420 History of Jazz

MUSIC 424 Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest

MUSIC 425 Topics in Jazz

KIN 703 Minority Groups in Sports

SPCH 450 Female Slave Rhetoric

Asian American

ANTH 524 Topics: New Immigrants

Hispanic/Latino American in the U.S.

SPAN 569 Special Studies: Chicano Language

and Literature

Native American

ANTH 533 Indians of Kansas

ANTH 630 Indigenous People and Cultures of North America

ART 662 Southwestern Indian Arts and Culture

HIST 537 History of the Indians of North America

LING594 Comanche Texts

B. Background/ancestral cultures of African American, Asian Americans, Hispanic American, and Native American ethnic groups of the United States.

African

ANTH 550 Cultures of Africa

ANTH 517 African American Music and Culture

ANTH 536 African American Cultures

POLSC 626 African Politics

Latin American

ANTH 634 Indigenous Peoples and Cultures of Latin America

ANTH 673 Mesoamerican Archaeology

GEOG 620 Geography of Latin America

HIST 560 Latin American Nations

HIST 561 Colonial Hispanic America

HIST 562 Modern Mexico

POLSC 622 Latin American Politics

SPAN563 Introduction to the Literature of

Spanish America

SPAN 566 Hispanic American Civilization

SPAN 752 Contemporary Spanish American

Narrative

SPAN 772 Hispanic World Today

Native American

ANTH 570 North American Indian Archaeology

C. Any United States ethnic groups and the ancestral cultures of those groups (all the courses listed under categories A and B, along with the following)

General

ANTH 220 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH 516 Ethnomusicology

ANTH 519 Applied Anthropology

ANTH 676 Old World Archaeology

ANTH 685 Race and Culture

BIOL 320 Economic Botany

ENGL 580 Selected World Literature

GEOG 100 World Regional Geography

GEOG 640 Geography of Europe

HIST 582 Modern Eastern Europe

KIN/ SOCIO 435 Sport in Contemporary Society

POLSC 629 Development Policy and Administration

PSYCH 535 Social Psychology

SOCIO/

SOCWK 510 Social Welfare as a Social Institution

SOCIO 541 Wealth, Power, and Privilege

SOCIO840 Comparative Social Systems

Asian

ANTH/ECON/GEOG/HIST/POLSC/SOCIO 505

and 506 Introduction to the Civilizations of

South Asia I and II

ANTH 545 Cultures of India and Pakistan

GEOG 680 Geography of Asia

POLSC 511 Contemporary Chinese Politics

POLSC 623 South Asian Politics

POLSC 652 International Politics of South Asia

SOCIO 742 Society and Change in South Asia

French

FREN 510 Modern French Culture

FREN 514 French Civilization

German

GRMN 530 German Civilization

Middle Eastern

ARCH 601 Topics: Architecture and Urbanism of the Middle East

POLSC 624 Middle Eastern Politics

POLSC 653 International Politics of the Middle East

Russian

GEOG 650 Geography of Former Soviet Lands

HIST/

RUSSN 250 Russian Culture and Civilization

HIST 591 History of Russia to 1801

POLSC 627 Eastern and Central European Politics

POLSC 630 Politics of Russia and Former Soviet Lands

University General Education courseUniversity general education credit.

Credit and content

All courses regularly offered for American ethnic studies credit have at least 40 percent or a major focus of content concerned with American ethnic groups, their ancestral cultures, or American ethnicity. Instructors and students of courses not regularly included in the American ethnic studies program may petition for credit on the basis of the same criteria.

Examples of specific courses for which the granting of American ethnic studies credit may vary are the following:

ANTH420 Ethnography of Language

SOCIO 541 Wealth, Power, and Privilege

In addition, departments offer courses on special topics, seminars, pro seminars, honors seminars, and independent studies that may apply for credit.

Relevant K-State-validated courses of transfer students will be accepted for American ethnic studies credit upon validation by the American Ethnic Studies Governance Board.

Gerontology

Gayle Appel Doll, Director

Center on Aging

103 Leasure Hall

785-532-5945

E-mail: gerontology@k-state.edu
www.k-state.edu/gerontology

The older population will grow significantly in the future, especially between the years 2010 and 2030 when the baby boomers reach age 65. By 2030 the 65+ age group is expected to grow to 20 percent of the population. Because of the increasing numbers of older persons and the fact that those elderly are living longer, there is growing need for people who have a variety of skills to work in the field of aging.

Gerontological specialists carry out diverse roles similar to those of other professionals while devoting the major portion of their professional time to working for or with older people. Their roles fall into the categories of direct service provision, program planning and evaluation, marketing and product development, advocacy, education and training, and research.

Secondary major

The secondary major in gerontology is a 24-credit-hour program of study that may be added to any primary major in any department/college at K-State. It includes two required courses (Introduction to Gerontology and Seminar in Gerontology) and 18 hours of elective gerontology courses from the list of approved courses offered in departments across the university.

Emphasis in long-care administration

The emphasis in long-term care administration requires courses that cover 10 training code areas as defined by the Kansas Board of Adult Care Home Administration as well as a 480-clock hour internship.

Students interested in the secondary major in gerontology or the emphasis in long-term care administration must meet with an advisor in the Center on Aging to determine which courses they should take to complete the program. Courses listed below will carry credit in the gerontology studies programs and new courses are added as they are approved.

Interdisciplinary courses

University General Education courseGERON315. Introduction to Gerontology. (3) I. Multidisciplinary introduction to the field of aging. Examines social, psychological, developmental, organizational, and economic aspects of aging. Theoretical, methodological, and applied issues of aging related to contemporary American society. Pr.: None.

GERON 600. Seminar in Gerontology. (3) II. An interdisciplinary course organized topically, with students presenting papers on aging-related issues that draw upon the students' previous and concurrent academic experience. Provides supervised independent study and subsequent discussion, allowing students to integrate and order their perceptions about gerontological issues. Pr.: Completion of 15 hours of course work in gerontology.

GERON 605. Practicum in Gerontology. (3) I, II, S. Supervised field experience in an aging-related setting as a practical application of gerontological knowledge and skills. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

GERON 610. Seminar in Long-Term Care Administration.  (3) (Offered January intersession only) Administration principles involved in the planning, organizing, and directing of long-term care agencies. Includes an in-depth exposure to federal and state standards and regulations governing long-term care.

GERON 615. Long-Term Care Administration Internship. (6) Includes: (a) field experience in the general administration of long-term care programs and/or facilities: planning, budgeting, program management, and service delivery; (b) exposure to federal and state standards and regulations governing long-term care; and (c) professional leadership development. Pr.: Junior standing, 15 hours of gerontology, MANGT 420, ACCTG 231, GERON 610, and GPA of 2.5 or above (3.0 or above in long-term course administration coursework).

GERON 620. Problems in Gerontology.  (1-3) Independent study of selected problems. Pr.: Background of courses required for problem undertaken and consent of instructor.

Departmental course electives

See the appropriate college sections of this catalog for further description.

College of Agriculture

Horticulture

HORT 525 Horticulture for Special Populations

College of Architecture, Planning, and Design

Architecture

ARCH 730 Environment and Aging

University General Education courseARCH 740 Building Related Health and Safety4

Interior architecture

IAPD730 Facility Management

Landscape architecture/regional and community planning

PLAN 315 Introduction to Planning*

PLAN 715 Planning Principles*

PLAN761 Community Development Workshop

College of Arts and Sciences

Biology

BIOL 404 The Biology of Aging

History

University General Education courseHIST 520 Death and Dying in History

University General Education courseHIST 534 Social History of American Medicine

Kinesiology

KIN 335 Physiology of Exercise

KIN 520 Practicum in Exercise Science*

KIN 796 Topics in Physical Education*

Philosophy

University General Education coursePHILO 365 Medical Ethics

Psychology

PSYCH 518 Introduction to Health Psychology

PSYCH 520 Life-Span Personality Development

Sociology

SOCIO 535 Population Dynamics

Speech

THTRE 253 Multicultural Storytelling*

THTRE 563 Storytelling*

THTRE 665 Drama Therapy for Special Populations

THTRE 760 Principles of Drama Therapy

College of Human Ecology

Apparel, textiles, and interior design

ID 651 Designing Supportive Environments

ID 710 Housing/Facility Management

ID 725 Community Housing Needs*

Family studies and human services

FSHS 300 Problems in Family Studies and Human Services*

FSHS 510 Human Development and Aging

FSHS 654 Death and the Family

FSHS 700 Problems in Family Studies and Human Services*

FSHS 704 Seminar in Family Studies and Human Services*

FSHS 764 Estate Planning for Families

FSHS 770 Economics of Aging

FSHS894 Readings in Family Studies and Human Services*

Gerontology

University General Education courseGERON315 Introduction to Gerontology

GERON 600 Seminar in Gerontology*

GERON 605 Practicum in Gerontology

GERON 610 Seminar in Long-Term Care

Administration

GERON 615 Long-Term Care Administration Internship*

GERON 620 Problems in Gerontology*

Hotel, restaurant, institution management and dietetics

HRIMD 475 Field Experience in Hospitality Management*

Human nutrition

University General Education courseHN 132 Basic Nutrition

HN 352 Personal Health

HN 400 Human Nutrition

HN 644 Women, Aging, and Health

HN 610 Life Span Nutrition

HN 650 Practicum in Nutrition*

HN 718 Physical Health and Aging*

*Center on Aging approval required for gerontology credit.

University General Education courseUniversity general education credit.

International Studies

Bradley A. Shaw, Director

215 Eisenhower Hall

785-532-1988

Fax: 785-532-7004
E-mail: ias@k-state.edu
www.k-state.edu/ias

The international studies program promotes understanding of the international community. The program encourages a substantial distribution of foreign and international course work under the direct, personal guidance of an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Students must enroll in another major before taking international studies as a secondary major.

Students who complete the secondary major in international studies are expected to include the following within their areas of knowledge or competency: speaking capability in a foreign language; basic geographic knowledge of the world; ability to understand and analyze cultures other than their own; some understanding of developmental processes; some understanding of international relations and processes of interaction; and some integration of their program of study into a meaningful and coherent whole. Please check www.k-state.edu/ias for any program changes or announcements.

Requirements
I. Language requirement

Students must complete the equivalent of four semesters of a modern foreign language.

Students must also complete 24 hours of course work, distributed as follows:

II. Core

Geographic knowledge

GEOG 100 World Regional Geography

Cultural understanding

ANTH 200,

  204, or 210 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

International relations

At least one course with an asterisk in the approved course list found at www.k-state.edu/ias/iascourses.htm.

Program integration

DAS 425 Senior Research in International Studies

or approved alternative.

During the senior year, the student will write a research paper or complete a project on an international topic. The research may be an honors thesis or design project in one of the participating colleges or it may involve independent study. Students may enroll in DAS 425 or in an approved alternative course. In all cases, the student must have the permission of a faculty member to supervise and evaluate the work. All students enrolled in Senior Research in International Studies must have their topics approved by the director of the secondary major in international studies.

II. Electives

The remaining 12 hours may be taken from the approved course listing. No more than 6 elective hours may be applied from a single discipline, and no more than 6 hours may be counted toward both a secondary major in an area studies program and in international studies. Students are encouraged to take courses in more than one college and are required to consult with the international studies director on the design and coherence of their international studies program.

Courses approved for the secondary major in international studies are found at www.k-state.edu/ias. The website listing is revised each semester as new courses are added and changed and others are removed from the curriculum.

Please note that other international studies courses are offered as “special studies,” “topics,” “problems,” or “seminar” categories. Intersession offerings may sometimes be acceptable. Transfer credits from approved study abroad programs, or other institutions, may be accepted as part of the student's program of study.

Elective offerings

Courses are generally available in the following fields:

Agriculture

Anthropology

Architecture, planning, and design

Art

Economics

Education

English

Finance

Geography

History

Human ecology

Modern languages

Political science

Sociology

Speech communication

Women's studies

Please see www.k-state.edu/ias/iascourses.htm for a current list of courses.

Latin American Studies

Bradley A. Shaw, Director

215 Eisenhower Hall

785-532-1988

Fax: 785-532-7004

E-mail: ias@k-state.edu

www.k-state.edu/ias

The secondary major in Latin American studies provides opportunities for students to examine issues related to Latin America from a variety of perspectives. This interdisciplinary approach is designed to help students understand the systematic nature of political, socioeconomic, technological, and environmental problems in Latin America and the value systems of the people involved.

The program allows students to work with specialists in the humanities and social sciences, and to benefit from the expertise and experience of scientists and engineers who are engaged in research or development projects related to Latin America. Students who complete the secondary major will be qualified to pursue graduate work in Latin American studies. The curriculum will enhance student qualifications for employment in research, economic development, social action, trade, and diplomacy related to Latin America.

A student from any college may choose the secondary major in Latin American studies to complement course work in his or her major. Many courses may simultaneously meet the student's own college or major degree requirements. In this way, electives and required courses within a college curriculum may count toward the secondary major in Latin American studies.

Courses approved for the secondary major in Latin American studies are found at www.k-state.edu/ias. The website listing is revised each semester as new courses are added or changed and others are removed from the university curriculum.

Please note that other Latin American studies courses are offered as “special studies,” “topics,” “problems,” or “seminar” categories.” Intersession offerings may some- times be acceptable. Transfer credits from approved study abroad programs, or other institutions, may be accepted as part of a student's program of study. Please check www.k-state.edu/ias for any program changes or announcements.

Requirements
I. Language requirement

Students must complete Spanish IV or its equivalent, or demonstrate more advanced competence in Spanish or Portuguese.

II. Area courses

Students must complete 21 hours of area courses, including Senior Research. Courses must be taken in a minimum of four departments, with no more than 9 hours in any one department.

Please see www.k-state.edu/ias/iascourses.htm for a current list of courses.

Courses are generally available in the following disciplines:

Anthropology

Geography

History

Modern languages

Political science

Sociology

Senior research

DAS 407 Senior Research in Latin American Studies or approved alternative.

During the senior year, the student will write a research paper or complete a project on a Latin American studies topic. The research may be an honors thesis or design project in one of the participating colleges or it may involve independent study. Students may enroll in DAS 407 or in an approved alternative course. In all cases, the student must have the permission of a faculty member to supervise and evaluate the work. All students enrolled in Senior Research in Latin American Studies must have their topics approved by the director of the secondary major in Latin American studies.

Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

Charles Martin, Director

118 Seaton Hall

785-532-6727

www.k-state.edu/nres

The natural resources and environmental sciences secondary major prepares students to apply broadly-based scientific knowledge to the use, management, sustainability, and quality of soil, air, water, mineral, biological, and energy resources. The NRES program offers a timely and relevant academic emphasis to broaden the environmental perspective students receive in their primary major.

Government, corporate, and public concerns about natural resource and environmental issues abound. These concerns translate into career opportunities for individuals with interdisciplinary training on how humanity affects global functions.

Because natural resource and environmental issues tend to be so extensive and complex, they exceed the scope of any single discipline. Students in the NRES secondary major study environmental issues from a wide base of academic viewpoints. Involvement with students and professors from other disciplines adds skills typically required in environmental careers.

Enroll by appointment with the director or by electronic form on the webpage

Requirements
I. Entry requirements

Students must successfully complete the following courses to become eligible to pursue the NRES secondary major. One course in the entry or block elective requirements must qualify as a life science course.

a. Four basic science courses (or their more advanced equivalent)

MATH 100 College Algebra

University General Education courseCHM 110 General Chemistry or University General Education courseCHM 210 Chemistry I

PHYS 113 General Physics or PHYS 115 Descriptive Physics, or University General Education coursePHYS 101 and University General Education coursePHYS 103 The Physical World and lab.

University General Education courseECON 110 Principles of Macroeconomics or University General Education courseECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics or AGEC 120 Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness

b. Two of the following basic NRES courses

These courses must be from different departments and total a minimum of 6 credits.

AGRON 305Soils
University General Education courseAGRON 335Environmental Quality
University General Education courseBIOL 198Principles of Biology
BIOL 210General Botany
BAE 533Applied Hydrology
FOR 285Introduction to Forestry
University General Education courseFOR 375Introduction Natural Resource Management
University General Education courseGEOG 221Environmental Geography I
University General Education courseGEOG 340Geography Natural Resources
University General Education courseGEOL 100Earth in Action
University General Education courseGEOL 105Oceanography
University General Education courseGEOL 115Environmental Geology
University General Education courseGEOL 125Natural Disasters

c. One life science course

This course may be used to meet other requirements.

II. Block elective requirements

From the following lists, students must successfully complete a minimum of 5 courses (15 hours minimum) from at least four departments. One course must be taken from each of the designated areas (natural, applied, and social sciences/humanities), two courses must be numbered 500 or greater, and three courses must have a prerequisite. These lists are continuously being revised, See the director for the most recent version.

Natural science courses

AGRON 305Soils
AGRON 515Soil Genesis and Classification
BIOL 433Introduction to Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology
BIOL 529Fundamentals of Ecology
BIOL 612Freshwater Ecology
BIOL 642Principles of Conservation Biology
BIOL 687Microbial Ecology
University General Education courseCHM 315Environmental Science
ENTOM250Insects and People
ENTOM 312General Entomology
ENTOM 313General Entomology Lab
ENTOM 680Aquatic Entomology
ENTOM 692Insect Ecology
University General Education courseGEOG 321Environmental Geography II
University General Education courseGEOG 535Fundamentals of Climatology
GEOL 305Earth Resources
University General Education courseGEOL 399The Mountain Environment
University General Education courseGEOL 506Geology and Environment
GEOL 515Geology of National Parks
GEOL 520Geomorphology
University General Education courseGEOL 540Ice Ages and Environmental Change
GEOL 711Water Resources Geochemistry
GEOL 611Hydrogeology
University General Education courseLAR 322Environmental Issues and Ethics

Applied science and technology courses

AGRON 330Weed Science
University General Education courseAGRON 335Environmental Quality
AGRON 375Soil Fertility
AGRON 501Range Management
AGRON 635Soil Conservation and Management
AGRON 645Soil Microbiology
AGRON 646Soil Microbiology
AGRON 655Site SpecificAgriculture
AGRON 746Physical Properties of Soil
ATM 558Soil Erosion/Sed. Pollution
ATM 653Water Management and Irrigation Systems
ATM 661Water and Waste in the Environment
BAE 530Natural Resources Engineering
BAE 533Applied Hydrology
BAE 620Water and Waste in the Environment
BAE 651Air Pollution Engineering
BAE 690Non-Point Pollution Engineering
BAE 705Irrigation and Drainage
BAE 761Natural Treatment Systems
BIOL 303Ecology of Environmental Problems
BIOL 684Wildlife Management and Techniques
BIOL 696Fisheries Management and Techniques
CE 550Water Resources Engineering
CE 552Hydraulic Engineering
CE 563Environmental Engineering Fundamentals
CE 565Water and Wastewater Engineering
CE 625Principles of Geoenvironmental Engineering
CE 654Design of Groundwater Flow Systems
CE 766Wastewater Engineering/Biological Processes
CE/BAE/   CHE 768Geoenvironmental Engineering Design
University General Education courseCHE 650Hazardous Waste Engineering Seminar
CHE 715Biochemical Engineering
EVET230Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology
EVET270Hazardous Waste Management
GEOG 705Remote Sensing of Environment
GEOL 730Petroleum Geology
GEOL 650Exploration Geophysics
LAR 420Natural Systems and Site Analysis
LAR 741Fluvial Systems I
RRES 575Management of Water Resources
RRES 635Methods of Environmental Interpretation
RRES 640Advanced Environmental Interpretation
 

Social science/humanities courses

AGCOM/   MC 712Environmental Communications
University General Education courseAGEC 525Natural Resources and Environmental Economics
ANTH 260Introduction to Archaeology
University General Education courseECON 527Environmental Economics
ENGL 680Environment in American Literature
University General Education courseGEOG 340Geography Natural Resources
GEOG 460Human Dimensions of Global Change
GEOG 718Geography of Public Lands
GEOG 720Geography of Land Use
GEOG 725Geography of Water Resources
GEOG 730World Agricultural Systems
GEOG 760Human Impact on Environment
GEOG 765Geography of Natural Hazards
GEOG 770Perception of Environment
University General Education courseHIST 511Environmental History
HIST 557History of American Agriculture
HIST 563Global Environmental History
LAR 646Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
LAR 758Land Resource Information Systems
PHILO 595Environmental Ethics
PLAN 315Introduction to Planning
SOCIO 536Environmental Sociology
 
III. Capstone course requirement

All students must successfully complete the NRES capstone course. This course should be scheduled during the senior year.

University General Education courseDAS 582/DEN 582/GENAG 582 Natural Resources/Environmental Sciences Project

University General Education courseUniversity general education credit.