Skip to the content

Kansas State University

Biology

Brian S. Spooner, Division Director

Larry G. Williams, Associate Director, Undergraduate Studies

University Distinguished Professors Conrad, Denell, Hartnett, Spooner, and Takemoto; Professors Blair, Chapes, Dodds, Joern, Kaufman, Perchellet, Upton, Welti, and Wong; Associate Professors Brown, Clem, Cully, Gipson, Herman, Johnson, Marchin, Montelone, Rintoul, Shah, Tomb, Williams, and With; Assistant Professors Asano, Ferguson, Fleming, Gido, Hancock, Hirt, Jumpponen, Mora, Morgan, Passarelli, Paukert, Sandercock, Thorpe, Ungerer, Von Ohlen, and Wisely; Instructors Boyle, Hook, Horne, Pacey, and Townsend; Emeriti: University Distinguished Professor Consigli; Professors Bode, Center, Kramer, Robel, C. Smith, Wilson, and Zimmerman; Associate Professors Klaassen, A. Smith, Urban, and Weis; Instructors Kundiger and Paulsen.

785-532-5718

Fax: 785-532-6653

E-mail: larryw@k-state.edu

www.k-state.edu/biology

The biology undergraduate requirements provide students a basic understanding of biological principles and methods and allow students to build on that base by further intensive or extensive study.

Course offerings and curricula accurately reflect both recent developments in the field of biology and changing requirements of students. Undergraduate majors are offered in biology; microbiology; and fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology, plus the professional (paramedical) and pre-professional areas. Students majoring in areas of the Division of Biology are assigned advisors to assist in planning their academic programs. Course offerings and degree requirements are sufficiently broad to allow great flexibility in tailoring a program of study to the interests and needs of an individual student. Undergraduate curriculum planning, including choice of areas of emphasis and elective courses, is ultimately the responsibility of students in consultation with their advisors.

Biology degree

Students in this major may obtain either the BA or BS degree. In addition to the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, biology majors must take the courses of blocks A, B, and C as listed below.

Block A: Courses offered by other departments

MATH 220Analytical Geometry and Calculus I4
CHM 210Chemistry I4
CHM 230Chemistry II4
CHM 350General Organic Chemistry3
CHM 351General Organic Chemistry
Laboratory2
BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
PHYS 113General Physics I4
PHYS 114General Physics II4
 
Prerequisites for MATH 220 are MATH 100 and 150 or four semesters of high school algebra and one semester of trigonometry plus appropriate math placement exam scores. Upon consultation with a Division of Biology advisor a student may substitute: Biochemistry I and II for General Biochemistry; Organic Chemistry I and II for General Organic Chemistry; Organic Chemistry I Lab for General Organic Chemistry Lab; and Engineering Physics I and II for General Physics I and II.
 
Block B: Division of Biology courses
BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
BIOL 201Organismic Biology5
BIOL 450Modern Genetics4
BIOL 529Fundamentals of Ecology3
BIOL 541Cell Biology3
 
Block C: Biology major electives
In addition to the Block B courses students must take a minimum of 15 credit hours of biology courses at the 400* level or higher, including two courses providing a laboratory experience.
 
*Students who take BIOL 340 will be awarded 3 hours of biology elective credit. 2 hours of upper-level credit can also be earned from BIOL 365.
 

Because the biology major has room for at least 20 hours of free electives beyond the 15 hours of biology electives, it is a popular major for students aiming at a variety of professional health disciplines, at graduate programs ranging from molecular biology to ecology, and at a diversity of bachelor's-level jobs. Depending on the student, free electives could be courses in computer science, statistics, foreign language, business, etc., and/or additional courses in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and math.

Microbiology degree

Students in microbiology may obtain either the BA or BS degree. The requirements for a microbiology major, in addition to those requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, include blocks A, B, and C as listed below.

Block A: Courses offered by other departments
MATH 220Analytical Geometry and Calculus I4
CHM 210Chemistry I4
CHM 230Chemistry II4
CHM 350General Organic Chemistry3
CHM 351General Organic Chemistry
Laboratory2
BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
PHYS 113General Physics I4
PHYS 114General Physics II4
 
Prerequisites for MATH 220 are MATH 100 and 150 or four semesters of high school algebra and one semester of trigonometry plus appropriate math placement exam scores. Upon consultation with a Division of Biology advisor a student may substitute: Biochemistry I and II for General Biochemistry; Organic Chemistry I and II for General Organic Chemistry; Organic Chemistry I Lab for General Organic Chemistry Lab; and Engineering Physics I and II for General Physics I and II.
Block B: Division of Biology courses
BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
BIOL 450Modern Genetics4
BIOL 455General Microbiology4
BIOL 670Immunology4
BIOL 675Genetics of Microorganisms3
BIOL 690Microbial Physiology and Metabolism2
 
Block C: Microbiology major electives
Students must take an additional 14 hours from courses listed below. At least half the 14-hour total must be laboratory courses.
 
BIOL 397,
495, or 697Topics in Biology1-3
BIOL 410Biology of the Cancer Cell2
BIOL 530Pathogenic Microbiology (lab course)3
BIOL 541Cell Biology3
BIOL 545Human Parasitology3
BIOL 546Human Parasitology Lab (lab course)1
BIOL 604Biology of Fungi (lab course)3
BIOL 625Animal Parasitology (lab course)4
BIOL 671Immunology Lab (lab course)2
BIOL 676Molecular Genetics Laboratory
(lab course)3
BIOL 687Microbial Ecology3
BIOL 698Problems in Biology (lab course)1-3
BIOL 705Eukaryotic Genetics3
BIOL 707Advanced Cell Biology3
BIOL 720Anaerobic Bacteriology2
BIOL 730General Virology3
BIOL 731Virology Laboratory (lab course)2
BIOL755Specialized Cell Functions3
ASI607Food Microbiology (lab course)4
AGRON 645Soil Microbiology (lab course)4
 

By consultation with a Division of Biology advisor a student may choose elective courses from Block C that allow a more specific focus on interest and experience. Areas of specialization would include prokaryotic microbiology, eukaryotic microbiology, biotechnology/genetic engineering, and infectious diseases. The microbiology curriculum coupled with appropriate electives provides an excellent education base for students moving directly into the job market, for students headed toward medical, dental, medical technology, and veterinary programs, and for students going into graduate programs in the biological sciences.

2 hours of upper-level credit can be earned from BIOL 365.

Fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology degree

Students in this major may obtain either the BA or BS degree. In addition to the requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology majors must take the courses of Block A, Block B, and one of the three options of Block C as shown below. Each fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology major will need to take an additional 10 to 18 hours of free electives to meet graduation requirements. Students who wish to qualify for professional certification as fisheries or wildlife biologists should consult their academic advisors about any additional courses needed for such certification.

Block A: Courses offered by other departments
SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
One math course*3-4
Chemistry courses**13
PHYS 113/114General Physics I and II8
or
PHYS 115Descriptive Physics5
STAT 340/341Biometrics I and II6
*To be selected from among MATH 100, 150, or 220.
**To be fulfilled by CHM 210, 230, 350, and 351 or by CHM 210, 230, and BIOCH 265.
 
Students who plan to proceed into graduate programs should take MATH 220; CHM 210, 230, 350, and 351; and PHYS 113 and 114.
 
Block B: Division of Biology courses
BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
BIOL 201Organismic Biology5
BIOL 433Wildlife Conservation3
BIOL 450Modern Genetics4
BIOL 529Fundamentals of Ecology3
BIOL 632Ecology Laboratory1
BIOL 640Population Biology3
Plus at least two courses in the Division of Biology (400 level or above, or up to 2 hours of BIOL 365) totaling 6 hours or more6
 
Block C: Options
Fisheries ecology and management option
BIOL 513/514Physiological Adaptations of Animals and Lab4
BIOL 542Ichthyology3
BIOL 612Freshwater Ecology4
BIOL 682Fish Ecology3
BIOL 696Fisheries Management and Techniques4
ENTOM 680Aquatic Entomology3
 
Wildlife ecology and management option
BIOL 513/514Physiological Adaptations of Animals and Lab4
BIOL 543Ornithology3
BIOL 544Mammalogy3
BIOL 551Taxonomy of Flowering Plants4
BIOL 684Wildlife Management and Techniques4
 
Biodiveristy and conservation biology option
BIOL 513/514Physiological Adaptation of Animals and Lab4
or
BIOL 500Plant Physiology4
BIOL585Principles of Conservation Biology3
 
Plus 11 hours of courses from the following list:
BIOL 542Ichthyology3
BIOL 543Ornithology3
BIOL 544Mammalogy3
BIOL 551Taxonomy of Flowering Plants4
BIOL 604Biology of Fungi4
ENTOM 312/   313General Entomology and Lab3
FOR 330Dendrology I2
FOR 340Dendrology II2
 

Pre-professional curricula

Students preparing to seek admission to veterinary, medical, dental, optometry, physical therapy, medical technology, and other professional schools may major in biology (or another discipline) provided the specific pre-professional requirements are met. Students should work with both an appropriate pre- professional advisor in the College of Arts and Sciences dean's office and a biology advisor to assure the proper planning of an academic program to meet their professional goals.

Students preparing to be biology teachers in secondary education are encouraged to pursue a degree program in the Division of Biology. Students should utilize both an advisor in the College of Education (regarding certification requirements and education courses) and a Division of Biology advisor.

Biology minor

BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
BIOL 201Organismic Biology5
Twelve additional biology hours, eight of which must be numbered at 400 or above.
 

Undergraduate research

The Division of Biology encourages exceptionally motivated students to participate in biology research, as a way of using information obtained in the classroom. This is especially encouraged for students intending to apply to graduate programs or professional programs following graduation. Students may receive course credit for these activities, which can be used to fill major elective requirements. Opportunities are available in the laboratories of individual faculty members, often with funding provided from research grants obtained by faculty efforts. Students may learn of these opportunities by discussion with faculty members having interests in biology which are similar to their own.

Biology courses

University General Education courseBIOL 198. Principles of Biology. (4) I, II, S. An introductory course for majors and nonmajors focusing on plants, animals and microbes. Specific areas covered include biological molecules, cells, genetics, energy flow, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Two two-hour studio sessions incorporating lec. and lab elements.

BIOL 201. Organismic Biology. (5) I, II. A study of the structure and function of organisms with special attention paid to the phylogenetic origins of taxonomic groups and the integration of their structural systems. Three hours lec. and four hours lab. Pr.: BIOL 198 or equiv.

BIOL 210. General Botany. (4) I, II. Plant groups and their evolutionary development. Physiology, anatomy, ecology, identification of seed plants, and economic applications. Two hours lec. and six hours lab a week.

BIOL 222. Field Ornithology. (1) II, in odd years. Identification of bird species in the field and the illustration of attributes of avian behavior and ecology. One three-hour lab a week. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

BIOL 303. Ecology of Environmental Problems. (3) II. Principles of ecology and their application to such problems as pollution, human population growth, and land-use planning. Two hours lec. and one hour discussion a week. Pr.: Two courses in natural science.

BIOL 310. Bioethics. (3) II. Discussions of the developments and use of biomedical technology and its social, moral, and ethical impact on the human spectrum from conception to death. Three hours lec. per week. Pr.: Junior standing.

BIOL 320. Economic Botany. (3) I, II. Origin and uses of cultivated plants useful to humans, especially grains, legumes, spices, beverage plants, fibers, and dyes. Pr.: BIOL 198 or BIOL 210.

University General Education courseBIOL 330. Public Health Biology. (3) I. Fundamental concepts of human infectious and organic diseases with emphasis on disease etiology and mechanisms, collection of epidemiological data, and the influences upon, and consequences of, governmental public health policy. Two hours lec. and one hour rec. per week. Pr: BIOL 198.

BIOL 340. Structure and Function of the Human Body. (8) I, II. Anatomy and physiology of the organ systems of the human body. Laboratory includes physiology experiments, study of anatomy from human cadavers, dissection experience, x-rays, and slide work. Five hours lec. and two three-hour lab sessions a week. Pr: BIOL 198 taken at K-State (with a C grade or better) or transferred introductory biology credit plus at least one of the following introductory natural science courses, taken at K-State with a C grade or better: CHM 110 (with CHM 111), CHM 210, PHYS 113, KIN 220, or any K-State biology course that has BIOL 198 as a prerequisite.

BIOL 365. Practicum in Biology. (1-4) I, II. Experimental approaches to learning biology through teaching. One hour rec. a week plus three to nine hours lab a week. Pr.: Permission of instructor and credit with superior performance in the course in which the student will be involved.

BIOL 397. Topics in Biology. (1-6) I, II, S. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

University General Education courseBIOL 399. Honors Seminar in Biology. (1-3) Selected topics. Open to nonmajors in the honors program.

BIOL 404. Biology of Aging. (3) II. An introduction to theories, both physiological and evolutionary, proposed to explain the aging phenomena. Major emphasis on a systems approach, e.g., circulatory, nervous, etc. A coverage of each system includes a review of normal structure and function, age related changes and age related dysfunctions and diseases. Pr.: BIOL 198; and GERON315 or a second course in biology.

BIOL 410. Biology of the Cancer Cell. (2) I. Current concepts of cancer biology including roles of cell surfaces, cell division, viruses, self-recognition, and chemical carcinogens. Pr.: Two courses in biology.

BIOL 433. Wildlife Conservation. (3) II. An introduction to the ecological and management principles associated with the fields of fisheries, wildlife, and conservation biology. Topics include population ecology and assessment, resource management, and environmental legislation. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 450. Modern Genetics. (4) I, II. An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of inheritance at both the organismic and molecular levels. Provides an integrated approach to transmission genetics and the fundamentals of molecular biology. Topics covered include Mendelian inheritance, DNA and chromosome structure, gene expression, mutation, recombinant DNA, quantitative inheritance, population, and evolutionary genetics. Three hours lec. and one hour rec./studio. Pr: BIOL 198, CHM 230, MATH 100.

BIOL 455. General Microbiology. (4) I, II. Microorganisms; their handling, morphology, growth, and importance. Two hours lec. and four hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 198 and one course in chemistry.

BIOL 495. Topics in Biology. (1-6) I, II, S. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 496. Honors Tutorial in Biology. (1-3) I, II, S. Individual directed research and study of a topic in biology, normally as a prerequisite to writing a senior honor thesis. May be repeated once to a total of 3 hours credit. Pr.: Sophomore standing, membership in the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences, and permission of instructor.

BIOL 497. Senior Honor Thesis. (2) I, II, S. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

BIOL 500. Plant Physiology. (4) I. Detailed consideration of physiological processes of higher plants. Three hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 201 or 210; and a course in organic chemistry.

BIOL 510. Developmental Biology. (3) II. Introduction to the stages and mechanisms of embryonic animal development. Integrated approach that includes classic experimental embryology and the genetic and molecular regulation of invertebrate and vertebrate animal development. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: BIOL 450.

BIOL 511. Developmental Biology Laboratory. (1) II. One three-hour lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 510 or conc. enrollment.

BIOL 513. Physiological Adaptations of Animals. (3) I. Integration of physiological mechanisms as the basis for adaptive responses of animals to different environments. Pr.: BIOL 201; and a course in organic chemistry or biochemistry.

BIOL 514. Physiological Adaptations of Animals Laboratory. (1) I. One three-hour lab a week. Pr.: Conc. enrollment in BIOL 513.

BIOL 515. Behavioral Ecology. (3) II. Study of the social, environmental, genetic, and evolutionary processes that affect animal behavior. Topics include evolution of social organization, spacing and group behavior, mating systems and parental care, sexual selection, communication, aggression, habitat selection, and foraging. Research project required. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 529. Fundamentals of Ecology. (3) I. Interdisciplinary examination of organisms and the physical environment, ecosystem structure and function, population ecology and demography, community structure and dynamics, and basic ecological principles and their relevance to contemporary environmental issues. Three hours lec. per week. Pr.: BIOL 198 and CHM 210.

BIOL 530. Pathogenic Microbiology. (3) I. Etiology and descriptions of major infectious diseases of humans within the perspective of host defenses. Two hours lecture and one hour laboratory-demonstration a week. Pr.: BIOL 455.

BIOL 541. Cell Biology. (3) I, II. Structure and function of cells and subcellular components. A molecular understanding of membranes and cellular physiology will be emphasized. Three hours lec. Pr.: BIOL 450 and CHM 350.

BIOL 542. Ichthyology. (3) II, in even years. Systematics, morphology, physiology, distribution, and natural history of fishes. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 543. Ornithology. (3) II. Classification, morphology, physiology, distribution, and natural history of birds. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 544. Mammalogy. (3) I. Characteristics, evolution, life histories, and ecology of mammals, especially North American game species. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 545. Human Parasitology. (3) II. Protozoan and helminth parasites of humans with lesser emphasis on ectoparasitic arthropods. Emphasis on life cycles, control, and laboratory diagnosis. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: BIOL 198.

BIOL 546. Human Parasitology Laboratory. (1) II. Examination of prepared materials and identification of internal parasites of man. Two hours lab a week. Pr.: Conc. enrollment in BIOL 545.

BIOL 551. Taxonomy of Flowering Plants. (4) I. Morphology, taxonomy, and biogeography of the vascular plants. Two hours lec. and two three-hour labs a week. Pr.: BIOL 201 or 210.

BIOL 604. Biology of the Fungi. (3) I. An introduction to fungal structure, function, physiology, ecology, and genetics. Importance of fungi as disease organisms, as saprotrophs, and in industry. Techniques of isolation, cultivation, and as experimental organisms. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 198 or 210.

BIOL 609. Cellular and Molecular Biology of Human Diseases. (3) II, in odd years. Fundamental basis of the major common non-infectious diseases and disorders affecting our society, with emphasis on the biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms by which the structures and functions of specific human tissues, organs, and systems are altered. Three hours lec. per week. Pr.: BIOL 450 and BIOCH 521.

BIOL 612. Freshwater Ecology. (4) I, in even years. Basic ecological principles of aquatic environments and environmental applications. Plants and animals of local streams, rivers, ponds, and reservoirs are used to demonstrate the interaction of biological processes with the chemical and physical features of natural aquatic environments. Three hours lec., three hours lab a week; two optional weekend field trips. Pr.: BIOL 201 and CHEM 110 or 210.

BIOL 620. Evolution. (3) II. A study of the theory of evolution including its historical and social implications. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: BIOL 450 or a course in genetics.

BIOL 622. Cellular and Developmental Biology of the Nervous System. (3) I, in even years. An introduction to the cellular and molecular biology and embryology of developing brains and nervous systems of vertebrates and some model invertebrates. Pr.: Two courses in biology.

BIOL 625. Animal Parasitology. (4) I, in odd years. Biology and pathology of the principal protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites of domestic animals and wildlife. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 198 and junior standing.

BIOL 632. Ecology Laboratory. (1) II. Laboratory and field experiences with ecological problems. Pr.: STAT 340 or equiv., and BIOL 529.

BIOL 640. Population Biology. (3) I. An introduction to the theories of quantitative population biology including dynamics, demography, and genetics. Emphasis on spatio-temporal variation within and among populations and species. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: BIOL 450 and 529 and STAT 340.

BIOL 642. Principles of Conservation Biology. (3) II. Biological diversity and the factors contributing to loss of biodiversity. Scientific principles of biological conservation emphasizing the application of ecological theory and population genetics to the conservation of threatened populations, species, and ecosystems. Three hours lec. per week. Pr.: BIOL 450 and 529.

BIOL 670. Immunology. (4) II. Chemical, genetic, and biological properties of the immune response, acquired immunity, and antibody production. Pr.: Two courses in biology; and a course in biochemistry or equiv.

BIOL 671. Immunology Lab. (2) II. Laboratory exercises in immunology. Pr.: BIOL 670 or conc. enrollment. Three-hour lab a week plus one hour rec.

BIOL 675. Genetics of Microorganisms. (3) I. The genetics of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Both the use of genetics in microbiological studies and the use of microbial systems to investigate basic genetic problems will be covered. Pr.: BIOL 450 and 455.

BIOL 676. Molecular Genetics Laboratory.  (3) I. Advanced techniques of molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology, including molecular cloning, library screening, polymerase chain reaction, and RFLP and DNA sequence analysis. A number of projects will be completed during the semester. One-hour lec. and two three-hour labs. Pr.: BIOL 675 or conc. enrollment and permission of instructor.

BIOL 682. Fish Ecology. (3) I, in odd years. The interaction between fish and their environment. Exploring fundamental ecological processes in aquatic systems at individual, population, community, and ecosystem scales. Two hours lec. and three hours lab per week. Pr.: BIOL 529.

BIOL 684. Wildlife Management and Techniques. (4) II. Concepts and techniques of wildlife ecology and management with emphasis on North American game species. Applied population dynamics as they relate to historical and recent developments in wildlife management, habitat improvement, and related material. Three hours lec., one hour rec., and three hours lab a week. Pr.: BIOL 433.

BIOL 687. Microbial Ecology. (3) II, in odd years. The ecology of aquatic and terrestrial microorganisms in their natural environment. Pr.: BIOL 455.

BIOL 690. Microbial Physiology and Metabolism. (2) II. The study of structure, function, regulation, and intermediary metabolism of bacteria. Pr.: BIOL 455; and BIOCH 521 or 765.

BIOL 696. Fisheries Management and Techniques. (4) I, in even years. Historical and contemporary issues in the management and conservation of exploited fishes. Methods for managing fisheries resources in streams, lakes, and ponds including estimating abundances, quantifying age and growth, manipulating populations, modeling population dynamics, culturing fishes, and improving aquatic habitat. Three hours lec. and three hours lab per week. Pr.: BIOL 201.

BIOL 697. Topics in Biology. (1-6) I, II, S. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 698. Problems in Biology. (1-8) I, II, S. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 699. Undergraduate Seminar in Biology. (1) I, II. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

BIOL 702. Radiation Safety in the Research Laboratory. (1) I. Principles of radioactive safety and radioisotope handling, licensing procedures, and laboratory techniques. Pr.: BIOL 198 or 455; and CHM 210 or PHYS 113.

BIOL 705. Eukaryotic Genetics. (3) I. An integrated exploration of transmission genetics and molecular genetics of eukaryotic organisms. Focus on genetic model organisms and their contributions to understanding mechanisms of genetics transmission and exchange, mutagenesis, gene expression, and regulation of cell division and development. Modern approaches to genomic analysis. Pr.: BIOL 450 and BIOCH 521.

BIOL 707. Advanced Cell Biology. (3) I. Selected current topics in cell biology reflecting recent advances in the field, including membranes and transport, protein sorting, signal transduction, cell adhesion and motility, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and specialized cell functions. Pr.: BIOCH 521 and BIOL 541.

BIOL 710. Endocrinology. (3) II, in even years. A survey of the glands of internal secretion in vertebrates with emphasis on mechanisms of control of hormone secretion and mechanisms of hormone action. Pr.: BIOL 198; and a course in organic chemistry or biochemistry.

BIOL 720. Anaerobic Bacteriology. (2) II, in even years. Study of anaerobic bacteria, anaerobiosis, description of anaerobic techniques, and physiology and biochemistry of anaerobes of the natural environment, including the gastrointestinal tract, and of veterinary, medical and industrial importance. Two hours of lec. a week.Same as ASI 720. Pr.: BIOL 455 and BIOCH 521.

BIOL 730. General Virology. (3) II. Theoretical and experimental basis of virology, with emphasis on how viruses manipulate cells to ensure their own survival, mechanisms of virus replication, principles of virus-host interactions including how viruses cause disease, and selected medically relevant viruses. Pr.: Twelve hours of biological sciences, including BIOL 450 and 455; and BIOCH 521 or equiv.

BIOL 731. Virology Laboratory. (2) II. An introduction to the techniques used in virus propagation, detection, and quantification. Emphasis will be placed on the methodology used to study virus replication and virus-host cell interactions. One-hour lec. and three-hour lab. Pr.: BIOL 730.

BIOL 736. Cancer Therapy. (3) II, in even years. Current methods of cancer management with emphasis on the kinetic principles of chemotherapy and radiation therapy; diagnosis; surgical oncology; oncologic emergencies; adverse effects of cancer therapy; and the new therapies; Pr.: BIOL 450 and BIOCH 521 or equiv.