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Architectural Engineering/ Construction Science and Management

David Fritchen, Head

Professors Burton, Fritchen, Goddard, Hayter, and Riblett; Associate Professors Goodman, Roberts, and Stephens; Assistant Professors Johnson, Kramer, Logan, Reynolds, and Yunk; Instructors Calvin, Dieker, Keen, and Wilkinson; Emeriti: Professors Bissey, Dahl, Hodges, Lindley, Mingle, and Thorson; Associate Professor Blackman.

E-mail: arecns@k-state.edu

www.k-state.edu/are-cns/

Pre-professional programs admission

New students, including transfer students, should submit the standard application form directly to the Office of Admissions. The admission criteria are the same as those for the university and the College of Engineering.

Any student who has completed more than 15 credit hours at Kansas State University in any major outside the Department of Architectural Engineering and Construction Science may change majors into either pre-professional program provided that the student has a resident cumulative GPA of 2.3 or better.

Admission to the professional programs

There are two distinct and separate pre- professional programs within the department: the pre-professional architectural engineering program and the pre-professional construction science and management program, each containing different course requirements. Other than course requirements specific to each program, the general procedures for acceptance into the respective professional program are similar and are described in the following paragraphs.

The pre-professional students must complete the first portion of the program prior to taking any upper-division professional program courses.

An application to the professional program must be submitted to the the Department of Architectural Engineering and Construction Science by the end of the eighth week of either the spring or fall semester. This submission will be immediately prior to the student's pre-enrollment into any of the upper-division professional program courses. All courses in the lower-division pre-professional program core of the program of application, valid at the time the student entered the university, must be completed and all grade criteria must be met by the end of the semester that the application is submitted. An exception to this rule is the student who expects to complete these criteria during the summer term. Those students should also make application in the spring semester prior to pre-enrollment. All eligible applicants will be allowed to pre-enroll into professional program courses with the understanding that they will be dropped if they do not complete the requirements for admission to the professional program prior to the beginning of the subsequent semester. Applications will be reviewed by the department's Academic Affairs Committee and accepted or rejected as soon as possible after semester grades are issued.

Pre-professional course requirements

Applicants must meet the following criteria for admission to the professional program of the curriculum as follows. Students must have:

1. Achieved a GPA of 2.3 or better in all of the courses in the lower-division pre- professional program core and courses which apply to the professional program, and;

2. Earned a grade of credit (CR) in a departmental seminar for each semester that the applicant was enrolled in the lower- division pre-professional program core, and;

3. Completed the following courses (or equivalent) with grades of C or better:

Architectural engineering
MATH 220Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
MATH 221Analytical Geometry and Calculus II
MATH 222Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
MATH 240Elementary Differential. Equations
CHM 210Chemistry I
CHM 230Chemistry II
or
BIOL 198Principles of Biology
PHYS 213Engineering Physics I
PHYS 214Engineering Physics II
ENVD 205Graphics
GEOL 100Earth in Action
DEN 210History of Building and Construction
ARE 100Architectural Engineering Orientation
CNS 200Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction
CNS 320Construction Materials
CE 333Statics
ENGL 100Expository Writing I
SPCH 105Public Speaking IA
ECON 110Principles of Macro-Economics
 
Construction science and management
MATH 220Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
PHYS 113General Physics I
PHYS 114General Physics II
ENVD 205Graphics
GEOL 100Earth in Action
DEN 210History of Building and Construction
CNS 100Construction Science and Management Orientation
CNS 200Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction
CNS 231Statics A
CNS 320Construction Materials
CE 212Elementary Surveying
ENGL 100Expository Writing I
SPCH 105Public Speaking IA
ECON 110Principles of Macro-Economics
ACCTG 231Accounting for Business Operations
 

None of the above courses in math, chemistry, or physics may be repeated more than once, with the exception of MATH 220.

4. Met the academic grade policy standards. A letter grade of C or better is required for all prerequisites prior to taking subsequent pre-professional program courses.

Professional program academic standards

After admission to the professional program, students will be subject to the following academic standards that are more stringent than those for the university.

1. Academic grade policy A letter grade of C or better is required for all prerequisites prior to taking subsequent professional program courses.

2. Warning of unsatisfactory progress Regardless of the overall GPA, a student with any D or F grade in any term or who has a term GPA below 2.3 will receive a warning of unsatisfactory progress. This warning will be removed if the student earns C grades or better in at least 12 credit hours of core courses with no D or F grades during the next semester in residence.

A student whose cumulative resident GPA drops below a 2.3 will receive a warning of unsatisfactory progress. This warning will be removed if the student raises his or her cumulative resident GPA to 2.3 or above during the following term.

3. Suspension from the professional program for unsatisfactory progress Regardless of the overall GPA, a student who has received a warning of unsatisfactory progress will be suspended from the professional program for unsatisfactory progress if he or she receives a D or F or earns below a 2.3 semester GPA for the second consecutive term.

A student whose cumulative resident GPA has dropped below 2.3 and has received a warning of unsatisfactory progress will also be suspended from the professional program if he or she does not raise his or her cumulative resident GPA to 2.3 or above during the following semester. A suspended student may not enroll in any Department of Architectural Engineering and Construction Science courses.

A suspended student must change to the pre-professional program or to another major. A suspended student who intends to appeal for removal of a suspension and reapply to the professional program must change to the pre-professional program. The suspended student may reapply to the professional program after one semester of suspension. The suspended student must take 15 hours of technical courses, to be selected by the Academic Affairs Committee of the department and the student's advisor, and achieve a minimum GPA of 2.5 during the “layout semester” to be eligible to reapply for the professional program.

Any appeal for removal of a suspension may be made by filing an appeal form with the head of the Department of Architectural Engineering and Construction Science at least one week prior to the first day of fee payment. The department head may reject any application or may submit it to the Academic Affairs Committee for consideration. Any and all actions on applications submitted by the department head will be made by the Academic Affairs Committee of the department in a hearing in which the student will be interviewed.

If a suspended student is readmitted to the professional program, any subsequent grade of D or F during any subsequent term will result in suspension from the professional program.

During this period, the student cannot enroll in any courses offered by the department. After the one-year suspension, the student may be readmitted to the program with his or her course schedule to be established by the Academic Affairs/Professional Program Committee of the department. Failure to meet the academic standards outlined above in any ensuing term or failure to comply with the academic committee's direction will result in permanent dismissal from the programs of the department.

The warning and suspension referred to above are departmental actions that are separate and distinct from the university's academic warning and academic dismissal. Grades earned during an intersession will not be considered in the determination of unsatisfactory academic progress.

Architectural engineering

The architectural engineering program is planned for students who are particularly interested in the engineering aspects of building design. The educational objective of the five-year architectural engineering program is to prepare the student with fundamental engineering competence in the analysis and design of buildings and their systems. Specifically, the student must be able to understand and apply engineering fundamentals and design principles for engineering the infrastructure of architecture—that infrastructure being structural, mechanical, and electrical building systems and all the subdisciplines related to these primary designations.

As important members of building design teams, they must be able to create designs that will fulfill the economic, safety, and aesthetic requirements of a project.

Included in the academic program are exercises in many of the courses beginning in the freshman year and continuing through the fifth year to develop skills in the engineering design process. The last course in this sequence is Senior Project, a culmination of all the previous design experiences from the first four and one-half years of the curriculum. Architectural engineers must have a working ability with total building and system design concepts.

Curriculum in architectural engineering (ARE)

Bachelor of science in architectural engineering

158 hours required for graduation

Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012. Telephone: 410-347-7700.

Pre-professional program (PARE)
Freshman
Fall semester
ENVD 205Graphics2
MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
CHM 210Chemistry I4
DEN 210History of Building and Construction3
ARE 100Architectural Engineering Orientation1
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
14
 
Spring semester
CNS 320Construction Materials2
MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
CHM 230Chemistry II4
or
BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
ENGL 100Expository Writing I*3
GEOL 100Earth in Action3
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
16
 
Sophomore
Fall semester
SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
PHYS 213Engineering Physics I5
ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
MATH 222Analytic Geometry and Calculus III4
CNS 200Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction2
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
16
 
Spring semester
ART 1002D Design3
or
ART 2003D Design3
CE 333Statics3
PHYS 214Engineering Physics II5
MATH 240Elementary Differential Equations4
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
15
 
Professional program (ARE)
Junior
Fall semester
CNS 321Construction Techniques and Detailing3
CE 533Mechanics of Materials3
CE 534Mechanics of Materials Lab1
ME 513Thermodynamics I3
IMSE 530Engineering Economics Analysis2
ARE 532Lighting Systems Design2
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
14
 
Spring semester
CNS 325Construction Drawing3
ARE 534Thermal Systems3
CE 537Introduction to Structural Analysis3
CE 212Elementary Surveying Engineering3
EECE 519Electrical Circuits and Controls4
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
16
 
Senior

Fall semester

ARE 411Architectural Engineering Design3
ENGL 415Written Communication for Engineers*3
ME 512Dynamics3
ARE 522Loading and Stability of Structure2
ARE 533Building Electrical Systems3
ARE 537Acoustic Systems2
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
16
 
Spring semester
ARE 524Steel Structures3
ARE 536Plumbing/Fire Protection Systems Design3
ARE640Building Mechanical Systems3
ME 571Fluid Mechanics3
Complementary elective***3
UGE humanities/social science elective (upper level)**3
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
18
 
Fifth year
Fall semester
ARE 528Reinforced Concrete Structures3
ARE 590Integrated Building System Design3
CE 522Soil Mechanics I3
Complementary elective***3
Free elective5
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
17
 
Spring semester
ARE 690Senior Project3
ARE 539Architectural Engineering Management3
Complementary elective***4
Complementary elective***3
UGE humanities/social science electives   (upper level)**3
ARE 020Architectural Engineering Seminar
16
 
*Expository Writing II must be taken if prerequisites for Written Communications for Engineers (ENGL 415) are not met from Expository Writing I, but may apply only three hours of ENGL 415 prerequisites towards degree requirements.
 
**Humanities and social science electives are to be selected from the approved list of UGE courses (see Engineering UGE course requirements).
 
***Complementary electives are to be selected from the approved departmental lists.
 

Construction science and management

The construction science and management program prepares students to be professional constructors and managers of personnel resources, financial resources, materials, and machines. The curriculum is an engineering-based management program designed to produce technically competent managers of construction. Entering students should have a background in mathematics and physics.

The program prepares graduates to execute the designs created by engineers and architects. Graduates may enter fields of general, commercial, residential, heavy and highway, utility, mechanical, or electrical construction. Their education provides the fundamental engineering and management skills necessary for success in any of the above areas.

Constructors work in many settings. For example, as a principal in a small construction firm, a constructor may engage in many of the activities in management, whereas a constructor in a large firm may concentrate exclusively on only one or two of the activities. Most students in the program intend to enter building, heavy/highway, or utility construction fields. Other roles, such as construction education, will normally require an advanced degree and/or professional experience.

Through construction education, students attain a level of construction knowledge that would otherwise require decades of practical experience to develop. With this level of knowledge, graduates typically move rapidly into upper management positions in construction organizations.

Curriculum in construction science and management (CNSM)

Bachelor of science in construction science and management

130 hours required for graduation

Accredited by the American Council for Construction Education

Pre-professional program (PCNSM)
Freshman
Fall semester
ENVD 205Graphics2
MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
DEN 210History of Building and Construction3
CNS 100Construction Science and Management Orientation1
SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
GEOL 100Earth in Action3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
15
 
Spring semester
ENGL 100Expository Writing I*3
PHYS 113General Physics I4
CE 212Elementary Surveying Engineering3
CNS 320Construction Materials2
UGE humanities or social science elective**3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
15
 
Sophomore
Fall semester
CNS 231Statics A3
PHYS 114General Physics II4
CNS 200Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction2
ACCTG 231Accounting for Business Operation3
ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
15
 
Professional program (CNSM)
Spring semester
CE 331Strength of Materials3
CE 332Strength of Materials Lab1
CNS 321Construction Techniques and Detailing3
CNS 330Site Construction3
MANGT 390Business Law I3
UGE humanities or social science elective   (upper level)**3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
16
 
Junior
Fall semester
CNS 522Theory of Structures3
CNS 325Construction Drawings3
CNS 536Water Supply and Plumbing3
CNS 534Heating and Air Conditioning3
ARE 537Acoustic Systems2
Management elective (general)***3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
17
 
Spring semester
CNS 524Steel Construction3
CNS 540Construction Methods and Equipment3
CNS 535Electrical Service and Installation3
ENGL 415Written Communications for Engineers*3
Management elective (labor)***3
CNS 650Construction Safety2
CNS 016Construction Seminar
17
 
Senior
Fall semester
CNS 523Timber Construction2
CNS 645Construction Scheduling and Cost Control3
CNS 641Construction Estimating4
CNS 642Construction Management3
Management elective***3
Professional elective***2
CNS 016Construction Seminar
17
 
Spring semester
CNS 528Concrete and Masonry Construction3
CNS640Construction Operations3
CE 322Soil and Foundation Construction3
Management or professional elective3
Professional elective3
UGE humanities or social science elective   (upper level)3
CNS 016Construction Seminar
18
 

*Expository Writing II must be taken if prerequisites for Written Communications for Engineers (ENGL 415) are not met from Expository Writing I, but may apply only three hours of ENGL 415 prerequisites towards degree requirements.

**Humanities and social science electives are to be selected form the approved catalog list of UGE courses (see Engineering UGE course requirements).

***Management electives and professional electives are to be selected from approved departmental lists.

Architectural engineering courses

ARE 020. Architectural Engineering Seminar. (0) I, II. Presentation of professional problems and practices by students, faculty, and professionals associated with the career of architectural engineering. One hour lec. a month.

ARE 100. Architectural Engineering Orientation. (1) I. Introduction to architectural engineering; emphasis on relationship of architectural engineering to the building industry. One hour lec. a week.

ARE 311. CAD in Engineering and Construction. (2) I, II. On sufficient demand. Basics of CAD and the applications to the engineering and construction industry. Two hours lecture and six hours lab a week (7 week course). Pr.: CNS210.

ARE 411. Architectural Engineering Design. (3) I, II. Principles and elements of design; synthesis of structural, mechanical, electrical, lighting, sanitary, and construction systems, considering interrelationship in performance and economics. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: ART 100, 190, CNS 325.

ARE 499. Honors Research in Architectural Engineering. (Var.) I, II. Individual research problem selected with approval of faculty advisor. Open to students in the College of Engineering honors program. A report is presented orally and in writing during the last semester.

ARE 522. Loading and Stability of Structures. (2) I, II. Review of code loading requirements, applications, design, and bracing criteria for buildings. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: CE 533, CE 534, and CNS210.

ARE 524. Steel Structures. (3) I, II. Analysis and design of steel structures following the AISC/LRFD Specifications for buildings. Includes background on the probability-based LRFD method. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 522 and CE 537.

ARE 528. Reinforced Concrete Structures. (3) I, II. Design of reinforced concrete building frames; footings, columns and floor systems, attention being given to costs and economical design. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 522 and CE 537.

ARE 532. Lighting Systems Design. (2) I, II. Study of human needs in lighting, lighting sources, lighting systems design, and application. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 114 or 214.

ARE 533. Building Electrical Systems. (3) I, II. Study of basic design of building electrical systems including circuit design, power distribution, and service equipment. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 519.

ARE 534. Thermal Systems. (3) I, II. Study of man's physiological needs, principles of heat transfer, principles of building thermal balance, comfort systems, and space-use relationships involving heating, ventilating, and cooling as integral parts of architectural engineering design. Three hours a week. Pr.: PHYS 214 and CNS 321.

ARE 536. Plumbing/Fire Protection Systems Design. (3) I, II. Sewage disposal systems, building plumbing and fire protection systems, space relationships, equipment requirements as related to architectural design, structural systems, construction materials, and techniques. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 213 and CNS 321.

ARE 537. Acoustic Systems. (2) I, II. Hearing and the ear, sound generation, acoustical correction, noise reduction, and sound transmission all as integral parts of architectural design. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 113 or 213.

ARE 539. Architectural Engineering Management. (3) I, II. General business and management procedures. Drawings, specifications, and conceptual estimating. Contracts, bonds, liability, arbitration, and insurance. Project financing. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ME560. Must be taken conc. with ARE 690.

ARE 540. Building Mechanical Systems. (3) I, II. Study of heat loss and heat gain using computers, various types of HVAC air systems selection and application, HVAC hydronic systems, and an introduction to mechanical system controls Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 534 and ME 513.

ARE 590. Integrated Building System Design. (3) I, II. Methods for integration and coordination of structural, mechanical, electrical, and lighting systems in the building architectural design process. Two hours rec., four hours lab per week. Pr.: ARE 411, 532, 533, 536, and 540. Must be taken the semester immediately prior to ARE 690 Senior Project.

ARE 620. Problems in Architectural Engineering. (Var.) I, II, S. A study of specific design problems under the direct supervision of a member of the architectural engineering faculty. Pr.: Approval of the department head.

ARE 623. Timber Structures. (3) II. Analysis and design of timber structures including dimension lumber, glu-lam members, and engineered wood products. three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CE 537 and ARE 522.

ARE 690. Senior Project. (3) I, II. Student working individually with laboratory support will prepare and present a project of appropriate scope and complexity with emphasis on structural, mechanical, acoustical, electrica,l and lighting requirements. Nine hours lab a week. Pr.: ARE 524, 528, 590, and CE 522. Must be taken concurrently with ARE 539 Architectural Engineering Management

ARE 710. Building Energy Analysis. (2) I. Study of building energy consumption and current modeling techniques to analyze overall energy usage including: economic evaluation and energy efficient system selection for new construction. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE640 or instructor permission.

ARE 720. Topics in Architectural Engineering. (V) I, II, S. A study of specific design problems in architectural engineering. Pr.: or conc.: ARE 590.

ARE 724. Advanced Sanitation Systems. (3) I. Water quality and treatment, pressure control, and hydraulics in domestic water and waste systems. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 536 or CNS 536.

ARE 731. Advanced Lighting Design. (3) II. Lighting modeling and analysis used in lighting design practice, and computer-assisted lighting analysis. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ARE 532.

ARE 734. Building Thermal Systems Design. (3) II. Design and specifications of selected thermal and mechanical systems for structures. The course uses all the modern techniques of thermal/mechanical system design for buildings. Students are required to develop term research design projects. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: ARE640.

ARE 735. Electrical Systems Design. (3) I. Complete design and specifications of electrical systems for a selected structure. The course uses the National Electrical Code in conjunction with all the modern techniques of electrical systems design for buildings. Students are required to develop term research design projects. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: ARE 533.

ARE 740. Environmental Control Systems in Buildings. (3) II. Electric, electronic, and pneumatic control systems to optimize energy usage and environmental comfort in buildings. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE640 and EECE 519.

ARE 741. Building Communications Systems. (3) I. Detailed design and analysis of special electrical systems for buildings including fire alarm and communications systems. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 533.

ARE 760. Masonry Structural Design. (3) II. Introduction to masonry materials, specifications, testing, and construction methods. The design of unreinforced and reinforced masonry structures according to applicable building codes. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 528 or equiv. first course in reinforced concrete design.

ARE 780. Advanced Structural Topics. (3) II. Continuation of Steel Structures and Reinforced Concrete Structures with special emphasis on the complete problem of the structure as a whole. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARE 524 and 528.

ARE 890. Problems in Architectural Engineering. (Var.) I, II, S. A study of a specific problem under the direct supervision of a member of the architectural engineering faculty. Pr.: Approval of major professor. May be repeated.

ARE 898. Master's Report. (Var.) I, II, S. Topics selected with approval of a major professor and department head.

ARE 899. Master's Thesis. (Var.) I, II, S. Topics selected with approval of major professor and department head.

Construction science and management courses

CNS 016. Construction Seminar. (0) I, II. Presentation of professional problems and practices by students, faculty, contractors, architects, and various organizations associated with the building industry. One hour lec. a month.

CNS 100. Construction Science and Management Orientation. (1) I. Introduction to construction science and management; emphasis on the relationship of the program to the construction industry. One hour lec. a week.

CNS 200. Computer Applications in Engineering and Construction. (2) I, II. Fundamental applications of computer programming and software using engineering and construction problems, primarily advanced use of spreadsheets with macros, data tables, embedded graphics, and presentations. Four hours lab per week. Pr.: Sophomore standing and MATH 150, or equiv. course in trigonomtery.

CNS 231. Statics A. (3) I, II. Composition and resolution of forces; equilibrium of force systems; application of the principles of statics to problems, including force analyses of simple structures. Centroids; moments of inertia. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: MATH 150 or equiv., PHYS 113 and MATH 220.

CNS 320. Construction Materials. (2) I, II. Study and analysis of construction materials, their properties, selection, and use. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: ENVD 205.

CNS 321. Construction Techniques and Detailing. (3) I, II. Study of construction methods and procedures in the assembly of building materials. Nine hours lab a week. Pr.: ENVD 205 and CNS 320.

CNS 325. Construction Drawings. (3) I, II. Production of a set of construction drawings. Emphasis on construction procedures. Introduction to shop drawings. Nine hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 321.

CNS 330. Site Construction. (3) I, II. Study of site construction problems and procedures, site survey and investigations, review of site plans, construction layouts, earthwork calculation, excavation/shoring methods, computer applications. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CE 212, CNS210, ENVD 205, PHYS 113.

CNS 499. Honors Research in Construction Science. (Var.) I, II. Individual research problem selected with approval of faculty advisor. Open to students in the College of Engineering honors program. A report is presented orally and in writing during the last semester.

CNS 510. Computer Applications in Construction Science. (V) I, II. On sufficient demand. Applications of specialized computer techniques to the solution of problems in construction science. By appointment. Pr.: CNS 200.

CNS 522. Theory of Structures. (3) I, II. The elastic analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures. Emphasis on equilibrium equations, shear and moment diagrams, and solving forces in trusses. Includes solutions of indeterminate structures by moment distribution and matrix stiffness method with microcomputer applications. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CE 331.

CNS 523. Timber Construction. (2) I, II. Principles of design, fabrication, and erection of timber structures including both solid and laminated materials. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: CNS 522.

CNS 524. Steel Construction. (3) I, II. Principles of design, fabrication, and erection of structural steel in conformance with codes. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 522.

CNS 528. Concrete and Masonry Construction. (3) I, II. Principles of design, fabrication, and erection of concrete and masonry structures. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 522.

CNS 534. Heating and Air Conditioning. (3) I, II. Principles of designing, applying, installing, and estimating heating and air conditioning systems for buildings. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 113 and CNS 321.

CNS 535. Electrical Service and Installation. (3) II. Basic design and construction of building electrical, lighting, and distribution systems with emphasis on the National Electrical Code and installation. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 114 and CNS 321.

CNS 536. Water Supply and Plumbing. (3) I, II. Principles and practices of plumbing and fire protection systems in buildings including code requirements and estimating. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 113 and CNS 321.

CNS 540. Construction Methods and Equipment. (3) I, II. Operations, costs, productivity of construction equipment. Investments/life cycle costing of the equipment. Equipment selection criteria and analysis. Construction methods. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CNS 321 and 330. Pr. or conc.: CNS 522.

CNS 544. Problems in Construction Science. (Var.) I, II, S. A study of specific design problems under the direct supervision of a member of the construction science faculty. Pr.: Junior standing.

CNS 545. Heavy Construction Methods. (3) I. Principles of asphalt, asphalt and concrete paving operations, concrete batch plant operations, heavy construction equipment, and applications. Three hours recitation a week. Pr.: CNS 325 and 540.

CNS 634. Building Systems Commissioning. (2) I. On sufficient demand. Principles and methods of proper procedures for installing, commissioning, and maintaining efficient performance of mechanical, plumbing, fire protection, electrical, and lighting systems in buildings. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: CNS 534, 535, and 536.

CNS 641. Construction Estimating. (4) I, II. Understanding estimating procedures, quantity surveying, specification reviews, pricing of an estimate, market analysis, subcontractor and supplier solicitation, and risk management, following the CSI format. Two hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 325 and 540. Conc: CNS 645. Pr. or conc.: CNS 642.

CNS 642. Construction Management. (3) I, II. An introduction to the business of construction; study of legal considerations, contract documents, bonds, and insurance. Evaluation of the characteristics of the construction firm, organization structure, and financial performance. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CNS 540.

CNS 644. Topics in Construction Management. (V) I, II. On sufficient demand. Topical material of importance in the management of construction such as marketing, ethics, personnel management, etc. Pr. or conc.: CNS 642.

CNS 645. Construction Scheduling and Cost Control. (3) I, II. Construction cost reporting and control. Construction planning, both long-term and short-interval, construction scheduling, monitoring, and controlling. Computer applications. Two hour rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 540. Conc: CNS 641.

CNS 650. Construction Safety. (2) I, II. Introduction to safety and safety programs, workers' compensation, OSHA organization and structure, safety policies and record keeping, safety standards. Emphasis will be on communication and job-site safety management. On-site safety inspections will be required with in-class presentations and written reports to be submitted. Two hours rec. a week. Pr. or conc.: CNS 535 and 540.

CNS 660. Construction Operations. (3) I, II. Shop drawing and submittal processes, field and office practices, change orders, construction safety standards and practice, pre-construction planning, expediting, and sort-interval planning. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CNS 641, 642, 645. Pr. or conc.: CNS 650.

CNS 738. Mechanical and Electrical Estimating. (2) II. Techniques of mechanical and electrical building systems estimating. Procedure for evaluating relative costs of different systems. Development of computer-aided finite and conceptual estimating techniques. Two three-hour labs a week. Pr.: ARE 534 or CNS 534, ARE 536 or CNS 536, and Pr. or conc.: ARE 533 or CNS 535.