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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2004-2006
    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
    Services for Students
    Auxiliary Services and Facilities
    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    Technology and Aviation
    dStudent Services
    dUniversity General Education Program
    dArts, Sciences, and Business
    dAviation
    dEngineering Technology
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Aviation

    Marlon Johnston, Department Head

    Professors Barnard and Gross; Associate Professor King; Assistant Professors Brockway, Shappee, Smith, Splichal; Instructors Beckman, Hiechel, Irvin, Kreiman, Rankin, and Sojka.

    785-826-2679
    www.sal.ksu.edu/aviation

    Airframe and powerplant certificate (APC)
    68 hours required for completion

    This two-year airframe and powerplant program prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration mechanical certificate with powerplant and airframe ratings. Students who successfully complete the program will be awarded a certificate of completion.

    Upon passing the FAA written, oral, and practical exams, graduates will be certified to practice as aviation maintenance technicians. A&P mechanics inspect, repair, modify, and maintain aircraft for manufacturers, commercial airlines, businesses, corporations, and general aviation operators.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    AVM 111Basic Aircraft Electricity4
    AVM 121Aircraft Drawings1
    AVM 131Aircraft Standards4
    AVM 141Aircraft Science3
    AVM 151Aviation Maintenance Fundamentals3
    15
    Spring semester
    AVM 112Aircraft Welding2
    AVM 132Aircraft Fluid Power3
    AVM 142Airframe Systems4
    AVM 152Airframe Structures and Repair5
    AVM 162Airframe Electrical Systems4
    18
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    AVM 231Aircraft Finish and Fabrication3
    AVM 241Navigational Aids and Communication Systems3
    AVM 261Aircraft Inspection and Assembly5
    AVM 321Powerplant Fundamentals4
    AVM 351Powerplant Ignition and Electrical Systems3
    18
    Spring semester
    AVM 312Aircraft Propellers2
    AVM 322Powerplant Operation and Troubleshooting3
    AVM 332Gas Turbine Powerplant5
    AVM 342Powerplant Induction and Fuel Systems4
    AVM 352Powerplant Overhaul3
    17
    Aviation maintenance degree (AVM)
    Associate of applied science
    83 hours required for graduation

    The applied science degree in aviation maintenance is a degree that can be earned in two years. The degree goes beyond the A&P certificate program to include general education courses recommended by the Kansas Board of Regents.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    AVM 111Basic Aircraft Electricity4
    AVM 121Aircraft Drawings1
    AVM 131Aircraft Standards4
    AVM 141Aircraft Science3
    AVM 151Aviation Fundamentals3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    18
    Spring semester
    AVM 112Aircraft Welding2
    AVM 132Aircraft Fluid Power3
    AVM 142Airframe Systems4
    AVM 152Airframe Structures and Repair5
    AVM 162Airframe Electrical Systems4
    18
    Summer Session
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    Natural science elective3
    9
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    AVM 231Aircraft Finish and Fabrication3
    AVM 241Navigational Aids and Communication Systems3
    AVM 261Aircraft Inspection and Assembly5
    AVM 321Powerplant Fundamentals4
    AVM 351Powerplant Ignition and Electrical Systems3
    18
    Spring semester
    AVM 312Aircraft Propellers2
    AVM 322Powerplant Operations and Troubles3
    AVM 332Gas Turbine Powerplant5
    AVM 342Powerplant Ind. & Fuel Systems4
    AVM 352Powerplant Overhaul3
    17
    Summer Session
    SPCH 106 Public Speaking I3
    3
    Aeronautical technology- aviation maintenance (AVMB)
    Bachelor of science
    128 hours required for graduation

    Students may continue their studies in aviation maintenance beyond the associate degree to obtain a bachelor of science in aeronautical technology.

    The bachelor of science degree is designed for the maintenance technician with supervisory or management position goals such as shop foreman, lead technician, director of maintenance, and other leadership positions.

    The additional courses will give the student background for leadership roles in the aviation industry. Courses enhance people skills and communications, both verbal and written. Additional math and computer skills will be developed.

    There are multiple opportunities for advanced education and training through aviation electives and advanced maintenance courses addressing the non-destructive testing of aviation parts and aircraft, and the use of advanced composites in the larger transport category, corporate and military aircraft. This degree provides the best preparation for the maintenance technician looking for employment in these fields.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    AVM 111Basic Aircraft Electricity4
    AVM 121Aircraft Drawings1
    AVM 131Aircraft Standards4
    AVM 141Aircraft Science3
    AVM 151Aviation Fundamentals3
    15
    Spring semester
    AVM 112Aircraft Welding2
    AVM 132Aircraft Fluid Power3
    AVM 142Airframe Systems4
    AVM 152Airframe Structures and Repair5
    AVM 162Airframe Electrical Systems4
    18
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    AVM 231Aircraft Finish and Fabrication3
    AVM 241Navigational Aids and Communication Systems3
    AVM 261Aircraft Inspection and Assembly5
    AVM 321Powerplant Fundamentals4
    AVM 351Powerplant Ignition Electrical Systems3
    18
    Spring semester
    AVM 312Aircraft Propellers2
    AVM 322Powerplant Operations and Troubleshooting3
    AVM 332Gas Turbine Powerplant5
    AVM 342Powerplant Induction and Fuel Systems4
    AVM 352Powerplant Overhaul3
    17
    Junior
    Fall semester
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    SPCH 106Public Speaking3
    Natural science elective3
    Aviation elective3
    15
    Spring semester
    CMST 104Database Management2
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    MATH 151Applied Plane Trigonometry2
    MATH 205General Calculus & Linear Algebra3
    Humanities/business/social science elective3
    Upper division aviation elective3
    16
    Senior
    Fall semester
    AVM 400Composites4
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    ENGL 302Technical Writing3
    BUS 315Supervisory Management3
    SPCH 311Business and Professional Speaking3
    17
    Spring semester
    AVM 405Non-Destructive Testing3
    Humanities/business/social science elective3
    Upper division aviation elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    12
    Professional pilot degree (PPIL)
    Associate of technology
    65 hours required for graduation

    The Jeppesen-Sanderson integrated flight training program is utilized to obtain private, commercial, instrument, and multi-engine ratings.

    The two-year associate degree emphasizes business courses as a complement to the English, math, and science requirements. Professional pilot graduates may fly as charter, business, corporate, or airline pilots.

    The flight training program is FAR 141 approved. The approval allows students to meet the commercial instrument minimum-flight-hour requirement in 190 hours instead of 250 hours.

    Flight training is conducted in Cessna 172s, Beechcraft Sundowners, Beechcraft Bonanzas, Beechcraft Barons, and a Beechcraft C-90 King Air. Both standard and full graphics simulators are used for additional training benefit.

    The lab time reflected in the pilot courses are minimum times. Significant time commitment is necessary for labs and flight training. This program requires additional costs above the standard tuition, books, and supplies.

    Freshman

    Fall Semester
    PPIL 111Private Pilot4
    PPIL 113Private Pilot Flight Lab1
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    PPIL 100Introduction to Aviation3
    14
    Spring Semester
    PPIL 112Professional Instrument Pilot3
    PPIL 114Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab I1
    PPIL 342Aviation Meteorology4
    MATH 150Plane Trigonometry3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    Computer elective3
    17
    Sophomore
    Fall Semester
    PPIL 212Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab II2
    PPIL 211Professional Commercial Pilot3
    PPIL 213Professional Commercial Pilot Flight Lab2
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    17
    Spring Semester
    PPIL 362Multi-Engine Ground School1
    PPIL 363Multi-Engine Flight Lab1
    ECON 120Principles of Microeconomics3
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    BUS 315Supervisory Management3
    ENGL 302Technical Writing3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    17
    Aeronautical technology- professional pilot (PPILB)
    Bachelor of science
    124 hours required for graduation

    Students may pursue studies in professional pilot beyond the associate degree level and obtain the bachelor of science degree in aeronautical technology.

    The Jeppesen-Sanderson integrated flight training program is utilized to obtain private, instrument, commercial, certified flight instructor, and multi-engine ratings.

    The student will receive the instrument flight instructor certificate in addition to advanced classes rooted in aviation applications. A multi-engine certificate opportunity and turbine-engine transition course are also available in this option with training available in the Beechcraft C-90 King Air.

    The flight training program is FAR 141 approved. The approval allows students to meet the commercial instrument minimum-flight-hour requirement in 190 hours instead of 250 hours.

    Flight training is conducted in Cessna 172s, Beechcraft Sundowners, Beechcraft Bonanzas, Beechcraft Barons, and a Beechcraft C-90 King Air. Both standard and full graphics simulators are used for additional training benefit.

    The lab time reflected in the pilot courses are minimum times. Significant time commitment is necessary for labs and flight training. This program requires additional costs above the standard tuition, books, and supplies.

    Freshman

    Fall Semester
    PPIL 111Private Pilot4
    PPIL 113Private Pilot Flight Lab1
    PPIL 100Introduction to Aviation3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    14
    Spring Semester
    PPIL 112Professional Instrument Pilot3
    PPIL 114Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab I1
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    PPIL 342Aviation Meteorology4
    MATH 150Plane Trigonometry3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    17
    Sophomore
    Fall Semester
    PPIL 212Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab II2
    MATH 205General Calculus and Linear Algebra3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    PPIL 211Professional Commercial Pilot3
    15
    Spring Semester
    ENGL 302Technical Writing3
    PPIL 213Professional Commercial Pilot Flight Lab2
    PPIL 415Human Factors in Aviation3
    PPIL 386Aerodynamics3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    Computer elective3
    17
    Junior
    Fall Semester
    PPIL 312CFI Ground School6
    CMST 104Database Management2
    Aviation elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    14
    Spring Semester
    PPIL 362Multi-Engine Ground School1
    PPIL 363Multi-Engine Flight Lab1
    PPIL 314CFI Flight Lab2
    ECON 120 Principles of Microeconomics3
    BUS 315Supervisory Management3
    Aviation elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    16
    Senior
    Fall Semester
    PPIL 482CFI Instrument Ground School1
    PPIL 483CFI Instrument Flight Lab1
    PPIL 450Aviation Safety Management3
    MKTG 400Marketing3
    ElectiveAviation3
    STAT 320Elements of Statistics3
    Business/management elective3
    17
    Spring Semester
    PPIL 445Aviation Law3
    Aviation elective3
    Aviation elective2
    Aviation elective3
    Natural science elective3
    14
    Aviation maintenance courses
    AVM 111. Basic Aircraft Electricity. (4) I. A basic concept of DC/AC circuits, with basic laws relating to the following: measuring voltage, current, resistance, continuity and leakage; relationship of voltage, current and resistance in electrical circuits; reading and interpretation of electrical circuit diagrams; electrical devices and inspection and servicing of batteries. Three hours lec. and three hours lab a week.

    AVM 112. Aircraft Welding. (2) II. Theory and skill development in aircraft welding processes. Exercises in gas welding processes as applied to ferrous and nonferrous materials. Oxygen/acetylene, inert gas, and resistance welding processes are to be studied. One hour rec. and three hours lab a week.

    AVM 121. Aircraft Drawings. (1) I. The course is designed to teach the student how to recognize and identify each kind of line as it appears in aircraft drawings and to interpret the meaning of the lines as they relate to surfaces and details in drawings. Three hours lab a week.

    AVM 131. Aircraft Standards. (4) I. A survey of the organization of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Civil Aeronautics Board. Emphasis will be placed on the regulations, standards, and specifications of each of these organizations. Also included is an introduction to air transport maintenance procedures. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week.

    AVM 132. Aircraft Fluid Power. (3) II. A study of basic fluid mechanics as it applies to practical applications in aircraft systems. Compressible and incompressible fluid systems will be studied. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 141.

    AVM 141. Aircraft Science. (3) I. This is a study of applied mathematics and basic physics. Section one: mathematics will provide the learner with the tools needed to perform the calculations normally confronted by the aviation maintenance technician. Section two: the study of basic science will enable the student to better understand the operation of aircraft and the many complex systems needed to sustain safe flight. Three hours rec. a week.

    AVM 142. Airframe Systems. (4) II. A study of the airframe systems and components to include: pressurization, heating and cooling, and structural device. Two hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 141.

    AVM 151. Aviation Maintenance Fundamentals. (3) I. This course is designed to permit the student to learn and practice those skills and techniques essential to the career development of the aviation maintenance technician. The subjects included are: shop safety, aircraft general familiarization, fluid lines and fittings, hand tools and measuring devices, aircraft hardware, cleaning and corrosion control, aircraft metals, inspection fundamentals, ground operation and servicing, and support equipment. One hour rec. and six hours lab a week.

    AVM 152. Airframe Structures and Repair. (5) II. A study of materials commonly used in airframe structures and the associated study of making structural repairs according to recommended procedures. Skills in sheetmetal are stressed. Three hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 141.

    AVM 162. Airframe Electrical Systems. (4) II. An advanced study of DC/AC circuits law relating to circuit analysis and a detailed study of measuring instruments. Advanced study of relays, switches, alternators, and other devices encountered in circuit analysis, troubleshooting, and repair. Two hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 111.

    AVM 231. Aircraft Finish and Fabrication. (3) I. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the wood and fabric coverings and procedures used on aircraft, and methods used in preparation for and application of paint finishes to aircraft surfaces. One hour rec. and six hours lab a week.

    AVM 241. Navigational Aids and Communication Systems. (3) I. A survey study of the aids to navigation and communications used in light and intermediate class aircraft. Operation and installation of the various types of equipment will be stressed. Two hour rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 111.

    AVM 261. Aircraft Inspection and Assembly. (5) I. A study of assembly and manufacturing procedures and inspection of aircraft components. This course also covers in detail annual and 100-hour inspections. Three hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 121, 131, 141.

    AVM 285. Helicopter Maintenance. (7) S. A study of airframe, rotor transmission, and engine components of turbine and reciprocating engine helicopters. Also includes a detailed study of required maintenance, historical records, and inspection of components. Three hours rec. and 12 hours lab a week. Pr.: Aviation maintenance major or consent of instructor.

    AVM 290. Problems in Aviation. (Var.) I, II, S. Advanced study in a specific area chosen by the instructor. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    AVM 312. Aircraft Propellers. (2) II. A study of the use, maintenance, and inspection of propellers and their related control systems. One hour rec. and three hours lab a week.

    AVM 321. Powerplant Fundamentals. (4) I. A study of the principles of operation, design features, and operating characteristics of reciprocating aircraft engines. Includes overhaul inspection procedures on current horizontal opposed and radial engines. Three hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 131, 141.

    AVM 322. Powerplant Operation and Troubleshooting. (3) II. Experience in installation, operation, and removal of aircraft engines. Engine analysis and diagnosis of malfunctions, including methods of remedy, are performed on airworthy engines. One hour rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 321.

    AVM 332. Gas Turbine Powerplant. (5) II. Advanced study of the fundamentals of gas turbine powerplants including operation, studies of supporting systems and inspection methods are fundamental to this course. Two hours rec. and nine hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 321.

    AVM 342. Powerplant Induction and Fuel Systems. (4) II. A study of aircraft induction and fuel metering systems including fuels, carburetors, fuel injection systems, superchargers, and other induction system components used to ensure a dependable and accurate fuel supply at any flight configuration and attitude. Two hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Conc.: AVM 321.

    AVM 351. Powerplant Ignition and Electrical Systems. (3) I. A study of battery, magneto high and low tension ignition systems, including turbine ignitors for today's aircraft. Also a study of powerplant starting and charging systems and related components. Emphasis will be placed on troubleshooting, repair, and timing of aircraft ignition systems. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 111.

    AVM 352. Powerplant Overhaul. (3) II. Practical experience in overhauling reciprocating engines. Engines are assembled and operationally checked in lab. One hour rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: AVM 321.

    AVM 400. Composites. (4) II. This course will introduce composite materials in use in aircraft production; the course will be mainly concerned with the repair of these materials and the repair procedures. The course will start with the development of composites, a description of each type, the different qualities of each type and hands-on projects for repairs, and the techniques involved with the repairs, such as vacuum bagging and hot bonding. Pr.: AVM 152 or consent of instructor.

    AVM 405. Non-Destructive Testing. (3) I. Introduction to nondestructive testing and inspection methods in use in the aviation industry. The course will cover the following types of inspection methods: visual, x-ray (radiographic) magnetic particle, ultrasonic, dye penetrant. Pr.: AVM 141, AVM 261 or consent of instructor.

    Aviation maintenance review courses
    AVMR 220. Aviation Maintenance Review/General. (4) The general review course is designed for those individuals who have met the Federal Aviation Administration's eligibility requirements under FAR 65.77. The review conforms to the three levels of training set forth by the FAA. Three hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: Departmental consent. This course may be offered in two parts as: AVMR 221 Aviation Maintenance Review/General I and AVMR 222 Aviation Maintenance Review/General II.

    AVMR 230. Aviation Maintenance Review/Airframe. (4) The airframe review course is designed for those individuals who have met the Federal Aviation Administration's eligibility requirements under FAR 65.77. The review conforms to the three levels of training set forth by the FAA. Pr.: Departmental consent. This course may be offered in two parts as: AVMR 231 Aviation Maintenance Review/Airframe I and AVMR 232 Aviation Maintenance Review/Airframe II.

    AVMR 250. Aviation Maintenance Review/Powerplant. (4) The powerplant review course is designed for those individuals who have met the Federal Aviation Administration's eligibility requirements under FAR 65.77. The review conforms to the three levels of training set forth by the FAA. Pr.: Departmental consent. This course may be offered in two parts as: AVMR 251 Aviation Maintenance Review/Powerplant I and AVMR 252 Aviation Maintenance Review/Powerplant II.

    Professional pilot courses
    PPIL 100. Introduction to Aviation. (3) I, II, This course will examine the history of aviation and a look at the future. Throughout the course we will discuss the attributes of an aviation professional, careers, career planning, and pilot certification. Students will consider historical events and their relationship to current aviation aspects. The interdependency and synergy in the development of military aircraft, the space program, as well as the growth of commercial and general aviation will be discussed. Students will use the Internet for various research projects concerning the past, present, and future of aviation.

    PPIL 111. Private Pilot. (4) I, II. The subject areas necessary for completion and passing of the FAA Private Pilot Written Knowledge Test are presented. Four hours rec. a week.

    PPIL 112. Professional Instrument Pilot. (3) I, II. A study of the procedures, regulations, and techniques required to safely fly in instrument meteorological conditions within our national airspace system. The course will prepare the student to pass the FAA Instrument Airplane Written Knowledge Test. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PPIL 111.

    PPIL 113. Private Pilot Flight Lab. I. (1) I, II, S. An introduction of the fundamentals of flight. Solo flights to include all flight operations and maneuvers necessary for meeting the aeronautical experience for the FAA Private Pilot Certificate. Three hours lab a week. Conc.: PPIL 111.

    PPIL 114. Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab I. (1) I, II, S. Instructional flight training necessary to maneuver the aircraft safely in actual or simulated instrument meteorological conditions within the national airspace system. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 111, 113. Conc.: PPIL 112.

    PPIL 196. VFR Pilot Proficiency Lab. (1) I, II, S. Instruction and flight training necessary to safely operate an aircraft to meet the Federal Aviation Regulations. This course provides the student the opportunity to review and demonstrate proficiency to satisfactorily meet the FAA regulations for the current ratings held. Pr.: FAA Private Pilot certificate.

    PPIL 197. IFR Pilot Proficiency Lab. (1) I, II, S. Instruction, simulator, and flight training necessary to safely operate an aircraft, to meet and maintain the Federal Aviation Regulations currency requirement of Instrument Competency, and maintain instrument currency and proficiency. Pr.: FAA Private and Instrument Ratings.

    PPIL 211. Professional Commercial Pilot. (3) I, II. The subject areas necessary for passing the FAA Commercial Pilot Knowledge Test. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PPIL 112, 114.

    PPIL 212. Professional Instrument Pilot Flight Lab II. (2) I, II, S. Instructional cross country flight training necessary to maneuver the aircraft safely in actual or simulated instrument meteorological conditions within the national airspace system. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 112, 114.

    PPIL 213. Professional Commercial Pilot Flight Lab. (2) I, II, S. An introduction to complex airplane operations and a review of those operations required of a commercial pilot. The completion of this course readies the student to take the commercial FAA practical test. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 212. Conc.: PPIL 211.

    PPIL 214. Extended Cross Country. (1) A characteristic of aviation is that aircraft can cover a large geographic area. Aircraft operations in other geographic areas may differ greatly from a student's training base. The experience of long-range navigation can be a great learning experience as well as a confidence booster. Selection of a destination that allows the student to increase their knowledge of aviation also aids in producing a more well-rounded, responsible professional. Pr.: PPIL 113

    PPIL 215. Mountain Flying. (1) A characteristic of aviation is that aircraft can cover a large geographic area. Aircraft operations in mountainous areas may differ greatly from a student's training. The experience of reduced aircraft performance caused by high-density altitudes can be a great training into operations with aircraft exhibiting marginal performance. Learning of weather patterns, hypoxia, and survival allows the student to increase their knowledge of aviation and also aids in producing a more well-rounded, responsible professional. Pr.: PPIL 113

    PPIL 216. Altitude Chamber. (1) I, II. This course offers a 1-day aviation physiology course for civil aviation pilots through the CAMI's Aeromedical Education Division in Oklahoma City, OK. In addition to the basic academic contents, this course offers practical demonstrations of rapid decompression and hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber, as well as a practical demonstration of spatial disorientation. Upon completion of the course students will receive a certificate noting that they have completed the FAA's Physiological Training course. Pr.: Current Aviation Medical Certificate

    PPIL 221. Preventive Maintenance. (2) This course will give the student hands-on experience with the maintenance tasks allowed under FAR 43 entitled preventive maintenance. Two hours rec. a week.

    PPIL 230. Private Pilot Glider Transition. (1) Instruction and flight training in the design, performance, operating characteristics, and flight proficiency for the safe operation of glider aircraft that will lead to an Private Pilot Glider certificate. This course provides students the opportunity to enhance and develop their skills in this segment of aviation. Pr.: PPIL 113

    PPIL 231. Commercial Pilot Glider Transition. (1) Instruction and flight training in the design, performance, operating characteristics, and flight proficiency for the safe operation of glider aircraft that will lead to a commercial pilot glider certificate. This course provides students the opportunity to enhance and develop their skills in this segment of aviation. Pr.: PPIL 213 and PPIL 230

    PPIL 295. Tailwheel Transition. (1) Instruction and flight training in the design, performance, operating characteristics, and flight proficiency for the safe operation of conventional-geared (tailwheel) aircraft that will lead to an endorsement allowing the student to act as pilot-in-command. This course provides students the opportunity to enhance and develop their skills in this segment of aviation. Pr.: PPIL 113

    PPIL 310. Aircraft Certification. (3) A presentation of Federal Aviation Regulations pertinent to aircraft certification, maintenance and associated documents, publication records, and weight and balance computations.

    PPIL 312. Certified Flight Instructor Ground School. (6) I, II. Instruction techniques, practices, and procedures necessary to provide skill in organizing and presenting lessons. This course will prepare the student for the FAA Certified Instructor Knowledge Test. Six hours rec. a week. Pr.: PPIL 211.

    PPIL 314. Certified Flight Instructor Flight Lab. (2) I, II, S. The needed flight skills and proper display of teaching ability will be emphasized. The demonstration of flight maneuvers with recognition of common errors in students performing the demonstrated maneuvers is stressed. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 213. Conc.: PPIL 312.

    PPIL 342. Aviation Meteorology. (4) I, II. Basic aviation-related meteorology concepts through the study of atmospheric elements and how they generally affect the weather introduction to the subject; water in the atmosphere; variables which cause local weather changes; specific aviation associated hazards; understanding meteorological reports and forecasts; meteorological techniques used in predicting weather patterns. Same as PHYS 342.

    PPIL 362. Multi-Engine Ground School. (1) I, II, S. Ground instruction covering multi-engine aircraft to develop the aeronautical knowledge to meet the ground school requirements for a multi-engine land class rating. Pr.: PPIL 211 or instructor approval.

    PPIL 363. Multi-Engine Flight Lab. (1) I, II, S. Flight instruction and experience in a multi-engine aircraft to develop the aeronautical skills to meet the requirements to add a multi-engine land class rating to the student's existing pilot certificate. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 362 or conc.

    PPIL 379. King Air Transition. (3) I, II. The needed instruction, simulator, and flight training to obtain skills and experience to fly the Beechcraft King Air as Pilot in Command. The demonstration of flight maneuvers necessary to meet the Federal Aviation Regulations and demonstrate competent operations of aircraft systems in the Air Traffic Control System and in emergency flight conditions. Pr.: FAA Private, Instrument, and Multi-engine ratings.

    PPIL 385. Airline Transport Pilot Rating. (2) By appt. Provides the student with the aeronautical knowledge necessary to prepare for the FAA Airline Transport Pilot Knowledge Test. The demonstration of flight maneuvers, with recognition of proper control of emergencies in compliance of the Airline Transport Pilot Practical Test Standards will be stressed. One hour rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: Consent of instructor and evaluation of student's pilot experience as it relates to FAR 61.151 through 61.157.

    PPIL 386. Aerodynamics. (3) II. This course covers incompressible flow theory and wing theory as well as calculations of stall speed, drag, and basic performance criteria. This course also examines configuration changes, high and low speed conditions, and special flight operations. Stability and control, weight and balance, and operational data are also examined. Aerodynamic performance of aircraft powered by reciprocating, turboprop, and jet turbine engines are considered. The student will be introduced to aircraft design and high-speed aerodynamics. Pr.: PPIL 111 or AVM141.

    PPIL 389. Problems in Aviation. (1-18) I, II, S. To provide the student an opportunity to apply aviation education to the improvement of skills previously learned as designated by the instructor.

    PPIL 396. Introduction to Aerobatics. (1) Instruction and flight training necessary to develop an understanding and flight proficiency in basic aerobatics. This course provides the student the opportunity to develop a better understanding of aircraft and safety of flight in other than normal flight attitudes. Pr.: PPIL 113.

    PPIL 400. Aviation Legislation. (3) A survey of state, federal, and international regulation of the aviation industry. Historical and current events, past and present legislation, conventions and treaties will be examined. Emphasis is on the historical and legislative aspects as they correlate to the development and control of aviation. Pr.: Junior standing.

    PPIL 415. Human Factors in Aviation. (3) I, II. Explores the physical environment and physiology limitations imposed on the aviation professional. Health, fatigue, human behavior and errors, communication, teambuilding, leadership, situation awareness, crew resource management, judgment, and aeronautical decision making are studied to achieve safe and efficient operation. Pr.: PPIL 111 or PPIL 100, or junior standing.

    PPIL 416. Crew Resource Management. (3) This course will involve using all available resources for a safe and efficient flight. The background and philosophy of Crew Resource Management (CRM) and the study of communication, behavior styles, stress management, situational awareness, leadership, and professionalism will be stressed. CRM techniques and skills learned in the classroom will be applied in the cockpit while flying scenarios in a multi-place, flight training device. Two hours lec and three hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 114, PPIL 415.

    PPIL 425. Advanced Aircraft Systems. (3) Electrical, environmental, hydraulic, fuel, ignition, and lubrication systems, including theory of operation and calculations. Principles, systems, analysis, operation, and limitations of advanced electronic navigation, flight director, and automatic flight control systems, including Inertial Navigation Systems, GPS. Pr.: PPIL 111.

    PPIL 430. Corporate and Business Aviation Management. (3) A study of the history of corporate and business aviation, the regulation of the industry, and the operation and management of corporate and business flight departments. Students will receive an overview of the social, economic, and political effects of business aviation. Aircraft selection and utilization, maintenance responsibilities, fiscal considerations, fractional ownership, and passenger and crew safety and security measures will also be studied. Pr.: Junior standing.

    PPIL 435. Air Transportation. (3) The development and present status of air transportation, federal legislation, characteristics and classification of air carriers; the organization and function of the FAA and the Civil Aeronautic Board are reviewed. Pr.: Junior standing.

    PPIL 440. Air Carrier Operations. (3) I, II. A study of Federal Aviation Regulations that influence air carriers and commercial operators. Students will gain an appreciation of the variety of regulatory issues involved in air carrier operations such as certification, training, and operational safety and security requirements. Students will also gather the background information necessary to correlate and apply relevant regulations to daily aviation operations. The course focuses on FAR Part 61, 91, 119, 121 and 135. Pr.: PPIL 111 or PPIL 100, and junior standing.

    PPIL 445. Aviation Law. (3) II. A study of how the U.S. regulatory and legal systems work in relation to aviation activities. It is designed to help those in the aviation industry understand their rights, liabilities, and responsibilities and avoid common legal pitfalls. Emphasis will also be placed on aircraft ownership, registration, and insurance. Pr.: Junior standing.

    PPIL 450. Aviation Safety Management. (3) I, II. A course designed to assist the student to develop an attitude and philosophy for accident prevention. The course includes ideal and practical, personal and organizational safety procedures and goals; safety philosophies; aircraft accident reports; human factors; principles of accident investigation; accident prevention program and accident statistics; current events; NTSB special studies. The safety program is analyzed from the theoretical and philosophic points of view. A safety program is developed with an examination of safety concepts, the human elements of accidents, managing a safety office in an organization, and current events. Pr.: Junior standing.

    PPIL 455. Current Trends and Issues in Aviation. (3) This course explores current trends and issues in the aviation industry. Emphasis will be placed on discussing current issues that are impacting the world aviation marketplace. Students will address these issues and trends from the standpoint of application to their career, relevance to the economic viability of the industry, and the impact such trends place on aircraft operators and manufacturers. Pr.: Senior standing

    PPIL 482. Certified Instrument Flight Instructor Ground School. (1) I, II, S. Instrument instruction techniques, practices, and procedures necessary to provide skills in organizing and presenting lessons in instrument flying procedures. This course will prepare the student for the FAA Certified Instrument Flight Instructor Knowledge Test. One hour rec. per week. Pr.: PPIL 312.

    PPIL 483. Certified Instrument Flight Instructor Lab. (1) I, II, S. Instrument instruction techniques, practices, and procedures necessary to provide skills in organizing and presenting lessons in instrument flying procedures. This course will prepare the student for the FAA Certified Instrument Flight Instructor practical test. Three hours lab per week. Pr.: PPIL 314, and PPIL 482 or conc.

    PPIL 492. Certified Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Ground School. (1) I, II. Provides the student with the aeronautical knowledge necessary to meet the requirements for the addition of an airplane, multi-engine rating to the flight instructor certificate. One hour rec. a week. Pr.: PPIL 312, 314.

    PPIL 493. Certified Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Lab. (1) I, II, S. Provides the student with the aeronautical skills and experience necessary to meet the requirements for the addition of an airplane, multi-engine rating to the flight instructor certificate. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: PPIL 314, and PPIL 492 or conc.

    Topics within Technology and Aviation:
    dStudent Services dArts, Sciences, and Business dEngineering Technology
    dUniversity General Education Program dAviation   
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    Kansas State University
    August 19, 2005