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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2004-2006
    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
    Services for Students
    Auxiliary Services and Facilities
    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    dDegree Programs
    dGeneral Requirements
    dProgram Options
    dApparel, Textiles, and Interior Design
    dFamily Studies and Human Services
    dGeneral Human Ecology
    dHotel, Restaurant, Institution Management and Dietetics
    dHuman Nutrition
    Technology and Aviation
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Family Studies and Human Services

    Bill Meredith, Director

    Professors Bergen, Bollman, Jurich, Kellett, Maddux, Meredith, Moxley, J. Murray, Russell, Scheidt, Schumm, and Smith; Associate Professors Bradshaw, De Luccie, J. Garcia, Grable, Hoag, A. Murray, Olsen, Smit, Webb, and White; Assistant Professors Coulson, Crowe, Fees, R. Garcia, Glasscock, Griffin, Myers-Bowman, Nelson-Goff, and Parsons; Instructors Cantrell, Hoover, Meier, Meyer, Molineux, O'Conner, Schraeder, and West; Emeriti: Professors Flanagan, Huyck- Young, Kennedy, and Stith; Associate Professors McNeil and Rainbolt.

    785-532-5510 Fax: 785-532-5505
    E-mail: fshs@ksu.edu
    www.ksu.edu/humec/fshs/fshs.htm

    The School of Family Studies and Human Services is focused on the study of individuals and families from a multidisciplinary perspective. Programs emphasize developmental processes throughout the life cycle, interpersonal relationships, personal financial planning, intervention for speech, language, and hearing problems, and educational programming for children and families.

    Undergraduate programs include communication sciences and disorders, early childhood education, general family studies and human srvices, family life and community services, life span human development, personal financial planning, and a dual degree program in family studies and human services and social work. In addition, students may combine degree programs in early childhood education and elementary education.

    The school places great importance on laboratory and field experiences, along with classroom experiences. On-campus field experiences for undergraduate students are available in the Early Childhood Laboratory, Family Center, Galichia Center on Aging, the Hoeflin Stone House Child Care Center, and the Speech and Hearing Center.

    For students pursuing early childhood education, the Early Childhood Laboratory and the Hoeflin Stone House Child Care Center provide on-campus observation and teaching. Both facilities are licensed by the state of Kansas and accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs.

    Students in the family life and community services program complete a field experience in a public or private agency that serves individuals or families. Agency staff and school faculty guide students in the planning, direction, and evaluation of these supervised experiences. On-campus opportunities for gaining experience are available through the Family Center, the Galichia Center on Aging, and various organizations and offices that address student needs. Students in communication sciences and disorders obtain practical experience in the Speech and Hearing Center.

    Communication sciences and disorders
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    The goal of the program in communication sciences and disorders is to educate professionals who are competent to help children and adults with communicative problems of speech, hearing, and language. The undergraduate program provides the foundation for the M.S. program in communication sciences and disorders, which is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation and meets the current requirements in speech- language pathology for the Certificate of Clinical Competence of the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association. Determination of the student's program of study and the completion of all requirements for certification are the responsibility of the student and the advisor.

    Students participate in observations of a variety of disorders and age groups in the Kansas State University Speech and Hearing Center. Students may, on invitation of the faculty, participate in supervised direct clinical experience in the Speech and Hearing Center.

    General requirements (33-34 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours)

    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
     
    Social sciences (6 hours)
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
     
    Humanities electives (6 hours)
    Students planning for educational certification in states other than Kansas are encouraged to take courses in western history/culture to meet this requirement.
     
    Natural sciences (7 hours)
    Biological science and physical science electives (One course must be taken from each area; one course must include a laboratory.)
     
    Quantitative studies (6 hours)
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    A college-level calculus course3
    STAT 330Elementary Statistics for Social Sciences3
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    GNHE 310Human Needs3
    or
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    University general education elective3
     
    Professional studies (41 hours) (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 310Early Childhood3
    FSHS 301Helping Relationship3
    or
    FSHS 420Interaction Techniques With Young Children3
    FSHS 347Introduction to Phonetics3
    FSHS 360Anatomy of Speech Mechanism4
    FSHS 361Hearing Science3
    FSHS 442Developmental Psycholinguistics3
    FSHS 443Language Assessment and Intervention I3
    FSHS 446Disorders of Articulation and Phonology3
    FSHS 515Laboratory in Acoustic Phonetics1
    FSHS 549Clinical Procedures in
    Communication Disorders3
    FSHS 560Clinical Research in Communication Sciences and Disorders3
    FSHS 567Basic Audiology3
    SPCH 320Theories of Human Communication3
    or
    SPCH 322Interpersonal Communication3
    or
    SPCH 323Nonverbal Communication3
    or
    SPCH 480Intercultural Communication3
     
    Professional electives (24 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    Choose 24 hours from the following:
    ANTH 220Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology3
    ANTH 280Introduction to Physical Anthropology3
    ANTH 281Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab1
    ANTH 420Ethnography of Language3
    BIOL 340Structure and Function of the Human Body8
    BIOL 404The Biology of Aging3
    EDCEP 315*Educational Psychology3
    EDCIP 310Foundations of Education3
    EDCIP 455*Teaching in a Multicultural Society1-2
    EDSP 324*Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom3
    or
    EDSP 500Introduction to Human Exceptionality3
    or
    EDSP 710* Education of Exceptional Individuals  3

    FSHS 343Communication Sciences and Disorders3
    FSHS 415Manual Communication3
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 591Undergraduate Topics in Communication Sciences and Disorders1-3
    FSHS 605Communication Disorders and Aging3
    FSHS 615Manual Communication II3
    GERON 315Introduction to Gerontology3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 352Personal Wellness3
    HN 644Women, Health, and Aging3
    HN 718Physical Health and Aging3
    PSYCH 202Drugs and Behavior2
    PSYCH 280Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence3
    PSYCH 470Psychobiology3
    PSYCH 505Abnormal Psychology3
    PSYCH 518Introduction to Health Psychology3
    PSYCH 535Social Psychology3
    PSYCH 540Psychology of Women3
    PSYCH 543Women's Mental Health Issues3
    PSYCH 630Human Neuropsychology3
    PSYCH 650Psychology of Language3
    PSYCH 715Psychology of Aging3
    THTRE 665Drama Therapy with Special Populations3
    Any one course in a foreign language
    Any one course that deals with world cultures
     
    Unrestrictive electives19-20
     
    Total for graduation124
     
    *These courses require permission from the CSD program's educational certification advisor.

    Note: National certification requires a course on culturally diverse populations.

    Note: Students who plan to obtain educational certification from other states are encouraged to take courses from the College of Education listed above.

    Early childhood education
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    This program is for students who wish to work in prekindergarten education programs in administrative or teaching positions, including work with parents and community resources as well as with young children.

    The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education has approved K-State's early childhood education program. Students completing the early childhood education program in family studies and human services are eligible for licensure by the Kansas State Department of Education in Early Childhood Education. Program requirements are subject to change to meet new licensure requirements. Early childhood special education licensure is available with advanced study. To complete the ECE program, students must have full admission into the teacher education program.

    Admission to teacher education
    Application forms for admission to teacher education are available in the Center for Student and Professional Services, 13 Bluemont Hall. The application should be filed two years prior to graduation. (See the College of Education section of this catalog for details.)

    Students transferring 50 or more hours from another institution should apply at the time of initial enrollment.

    Requirements for admission to early childhood teacher education program may be found in the College of Education section.

    Laboratory courses
    Before participating in laboratory courses involving contact with children, students must undergo a physical examination, including a tuberculosis test, at their own expense. Students must not have any physical or mental conditions that would interfere with the health, safety, or welfare of children.

    Students will be screened by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for criminal and child abuse histories (through the Kansas Bureau of Investigation and Social and Rehabilitative Services). Students with questionable histories, as determined by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, will be dropped from the early childhood education program.

    Directed experiences (student teaching)
    Application for student teaching must be made no later than the semester in which the student is enrolled in FSHS 546 Early Childhood Program Lab 2. Application forms are available from the director of Child Care Programs, 307 Justin Hall.

    Enrollment in directed experiences is by permission only. Directed experiences may not be taken until the student has obtained full admission into teacher education and has completed FSHS 420, 540, 541, 545 and 546.

    Licensure
    To be eligible for licensure in early childhood education, students must maintain grade point averages required for full admission into teacher education, complete the early childhood education option, including a grade of C or better in directed experiences, and receive recommendation from the School of Family Studies and Human Services for submission to Kansas State University's certifying officer. Students must pass the Principles of Learning and Teaching test as described in the College of Education section of this catalog.

    Application for licensure must be made during the semester in which the degree will be received. Forms are available in the Center for Student and Professional Services, College of Education, 13 Bluemont Hall.

    General requirements (36-37 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours) (Grades of C or higher required.)

    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
     
    Social sciences (9 hours)
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
     
    Humanities electives (6 hours)

    Natural sciences (7 hours)

    Biological science and physical science electives (One course must be taken from each area; one course must include a laboratory.)
     
    Quantitative studies (6 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)

    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    A college-level calculus course3
    Any 3-unit introductory statistics course3
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    GNHE 310Human Needs3
    or
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    University general education elective (300 level or above, outside of FSHS)3
     
    Professional studies (50 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 200Sexuality and Health2
    FSHS 310Early Childhood3
    FSHS 313Preschool Child Lab1
    FSHS 420Interaction Techniques with
    Young Children3
    FSHS 524Professional Seminar in Early
    Childhood3
    FSHS 528Exceptional Development in Early
    Childhood3
    FSHS 540Curriculum for Cognitive and Language Development for Young Children3
    FSHS 541Curriculum for Emotional, Social,
    and Physical Development of
    Young Children3
    FSHS 545Early Childhood Program Lab I1
    FSHS 546Early Childhood Program Lab II2
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 565Language Development3
    FSHS 589Administration of Early Childhood
    Programs3
    FSHS 598Directed Experiences*8
    FSHS 670Working With Parents3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
     
    Professional electives (12 hours)
    ACCTG 231Accounting for Business Operations3
    ACCTG 241Accounting for Investing and Financing3
    AGEC 202Small Business Operations3
    EDETC 318Instructional Media and Technology2
    EDSP 500Introduction to Human Exceptionality3
    EDSP 710Education of Exceptional Individuals3
    EDSP 724Characteristics of Mental Retardation3
    EDSP 728Characteristics of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders3
    EDSP 777Behavior Management for Exceptional Individuals3
    FSHS 300Problems in FSHS: Preschool Lab
    ExperienceVar.
    FSHS 302You and Your Sexuality3
    FSHS 312Infant Observation Lab1
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
    FSHS 704Topics in FSHS3
    FSHS 710Child Care: Components and Issues3
    FSHS 728Assessment of Young Children3
    FINAN 450Introduction to Finance3
    MANGT 420Management Concepts3
    MKTG 400Marketing3
     
    Additional requirements for licensure (14 hours)
    Social science elective**3
    Literature elective***3
     
    Select additional electives from the areas of humanities, social sciences, sciences, mathematics, general religion, philosophy, art and music history, and appreciation of art, architecture, music, or theatre to fulfill the general education requirements for teaching licensure in early childhood education8
     
    Unrestricted electives6-7
     
    Total for graduation125
     
    *First aid/CPR certification required before enrollment in FSHS 598. This requirement can be met by successful completion of Red Cross or American Heart Association courses.
     
    **A minimum of 9 hours other than psychology is required for certification.
     
    ***Literature for Children and Literature for Adolescents may not be used as literature electives but may be used to fulfill additional general education requirements.
     
    Family studies and human services
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    The family studies and human services degree program focuses on the development of the individual in a family context throughout the life cycle. Graduates work in youth programs, family and social service programs, residential programs, the courts, cooperative extension, higher education, and public health departments.

    Students who plan to major in a specialized program in family life and community services, life span human development, personal financial planning, or the dual degrees in family studies and human services and social work initially enter the general family studies and human services degree program. Upon meeting a specialized program's admission requirements, students may request a curriculum change to that program.

    General requirements (36-37 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours)
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I2
     
    Social sciences (9 hours)
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    or
    ECON 120Principles of Microeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
     
    Humanities electives (6 hours)
    Select from college-approved list
     
    Natural sciences (7 hours)
    Life science and physical science electives
    (One course must be taken in each area; one course must include a laboratory)
     
    Quantitative studies (6 hours)
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    Any college-level calculus course
    Any 3-credit introductory 300-level statistics course3
     
    Professional studies (64 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required)
     
    Professional courses (33 hours)
    FSHS 105Introduction to Personal and Family Finance3
    or
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 301Helping Relationship
    or
    FSHS 420Interaction Techniques with Young Children3
    FSHS 302Introduction to Human Sexuality3
     
    Select two of the following three courses:
    FSHS 310Early Childhood Education3
    or
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    or
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 670Working with Parents3
    Two FSHS electives (300-level or above)6
     
    Professional electives (25 hours)
    18 hours from 300-level or above
     
    Select from the following areas: psychology, sociology, criminal justice, women's studies, American ethnic studies, gerontology, anthropology, speech communication, statistics, business, education, or leadership studies.
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    GNHE 310Human Needs3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
     
    Unrestricted electives24
    Total for graduation124
    Family life and community services
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    The undergraduate program in family life and community services prepares students to develop and implement programs and services that strengthen and enhance individual and family well-being. The program is approved as meeting the standards and criteria required for the Provisional Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE) designation by the National Council on Family Relations.

    Graduates of the family life and community services program work in many different areas including parent and community education, social services, and human resources.

    Admission to the family life and community services program is selective and limited. Before applying to this option, students must complete the following: FSHS 110, 301, 302, and 350 with a grade of B or above; a minimum of 45 hours with a GPA of 2.5; and a minimum of 50 hours community service within the last two years. Once the preceding criteria are met, the student must complete an application form; provide a transcript or DARS report; provide documentation of community service work completed; and prepare a letter of application with three letters of recommendation.

    A maximum of 20 majors will be selected each semester.

    General requirements (39-40 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours)

    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
     
    Social sciences (12 hours)
    ANTH 200Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
    or
    ANTH 204Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (UGE)3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
     
    Humanities electives (6 hours)

    Natural sciences (7 hours)

    Life science and physical science electives (One course must be taken from each area; one course must include a laboratory.)
     
    Quantitative studies (6 hours)
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    A college-level calculus course3
    Any 3-unit introductory statistics course3
     
    Professional studies (60 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    Family economics (3 hours)
    FSHS 105Introduction to Personal and Family Finance3
    or
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
     
    Human development (9 hours)
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
     
    And two of the following:
    FSHS 310Early Childhood3
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
     
    Family life and community services core (27 hours)
    FSHS 301Helping Relationship3
    FSHS 302Introduction to Human Sexuality3
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 552Families and Diversity3
    FSHS 579Pre-Directed Field Experience Orientation1
    FSHS 580Directed Field Experience8
    FSHS 585Professional Seminar in Family Life Education3
    FSHS 670Working with Parents3
     
    Professional electives (15 hours)
    300-level or above, including at least 6 hours of FSHS courses, from approved list
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    or
    GNHE 310Human Needs3
    Unrestricted electives24-25
     
    Total for graduation124
     
    Life span human development
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    This program combines the study of human development with a strong foundation in the arts, sciences, and humanities. Course work emphasizes the development of individuals across the life span, the processes underlying development and aging through the life cycle, and the factors that enhance, support, or impede human development. The life span human development program prepares students for graduate study in a variety of applied and academic fields.

    Admission to life span human development requires completion of 45 hours with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 and a GPA of at least 3.0 in FSHS courses (including FSHS 110 and FSHS 310).

    General requirements (44-45 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours)

    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
     
    Social sciences (9 hours)
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    or
    ECON 120Principles of Microeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
     
    Humanities electives (9 hours)

    Natural sciences (10 hours)

    BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
    BIOL 310Bioethics3
    Physical science course3
     
    Quantitative studies (8 hours)
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    A college-level calculus course3
    Any 3-unit introductory statistics course3
    CIS 101Introduction to Information Technology1
    CIS 102Introduction to PC/Spreadsheet1
    or
    CIS 103Introduction to PC/Database1
     
    Professional studies (36 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 301Helping Relationship3
    or
    FSHS 420Interaction Techniques with Young Children3
    FSHS 302You and Your Sexuality3
    FSHS 310Early Childhood3
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 670Working with Parents3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 352Personal Wellness3
    Elective: any course in the American ethnic studies secondary major3
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    University general education elective (300 level or above)3
     
    Professional electives (18 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    FSHS or social science electives (300 level or above)
     
    Unrestricted electives19-20
     
    Total for graduation124
     
    Personal financial planning
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services

    The emphasis of this program is personal and family financial planning, which combines course work in personal finance, family relationships and decision making, consumer rights, insurance, investments, retirement and estate planning, economics, and accounting. Emphasis is placed on understanding financial products and how they work, as well as the role of family in financial decisions. The program offers financial planning courses that satisfy CFP® Board's education requirement for the CFP®/CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® certification.
    Kansas State University does not certify individuals to use the CFP® and CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER®, and CFP® (with flame logo)® certification marks. CFP® certification is solely granted by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards to individuals who, in addition to completing an education requirement such as this CFP Board-registered program, have met ethics, experience, and examination requirements.
    Admission to the personal financial planning program requires completion of FSHS 100 and FSHS 105 with grades of B or better.
    General requirements (39-40 hours)
    Communications (8-9 hours)

    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
     
    Social sciences (9 hours)
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
     
    Humanities (6 hours)

    Natural sciences (7 hours)

    Life science and physical science electives
    (One course must be taken from each area; one course must include a laboratory.)
     
    Quantitative studies (9 hours)
    CIS 101Introduction to Information Technology1
    CIS 102Introduction to PC/Spreadsheet1
    CIS 103Introduction to PC/Database1
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    A college-level calculus course3
    STAT 350Business and Economics Studies I3
     
    Professional studies (58 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.) Professional FSHS courses (28 hours)
    FSHS 100Family Financial Planning as a Career1
    FSHS 105Introduction to Personal and
    Family Finance3
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 301The Helping Relationship3
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
    FSHS 405Advanced Personal and Family Finance3
    FSHS 595Professional Seminar in Family
    Financial Planning3
    FSHS 760Families, Employment Benefits
    and Retirement Planning3
    FSHS 762Investing for the Family's Future3
    FSHS 764Estate Planning for Families3
     
    Integrative studies (6 hours)
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    University general education elective (300-level or above)3
     
    Other supporting courses (24 hours)
    ACCTG 231Accounting for Business Operations3
    ACCTG 241Accounting for Investing
    and Financing3
    ACCTG 342Taxation I3
    ECON 120Principles of Microeconomics3
    ECON 530Money and Banking3
    FINAN 450Introduction to Finance3
    or
    AGEC 513Agricultural Finance3
    FINAN 460Insurance3
    MANGT 390Business Law I3
     
    Unrestricted electives26-27
     
    Total for graduation124
     
    Dual degrees: Family studies and human services and social work
    Bachelor of science in family studies and human services Bachelor of science, social work major

    This program leads to a B.S. degree in family studies and human services through the College of Human Ecology, and to a B.S. degree with a social work major through the College of Arts and Sciences. The goal of this program is to give students skills in and knowledge of interpersonal relationships, an understanding of the developmental processes of children and families, and beginning social work skills. Upon completion of the program, students are equipped to work with families and individuals in social work settings. They also are eligible to take the social work licensure examination. The social work major, housed in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

    Admission to the dual degrees: family studies and human services and social work is selective and limited. Acceptance into the social work practice sequence is required for admittance.

    General requirements (52-53 hours)
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology
    ECON 120Principles of Microeconomics3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
    BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
    Physical science with lab4
    Biological or physical science3
    Biological or physical science with prerequisite
    in the same department3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    STAT 330Elementary Statistics for
    Social Science3
    Fine arts elective3
    Philosophy elective3
    Literary or rhetorical arts course3
    POLSC 301Introduction to Political Thought3
    ANTH 200Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
    or
    ANTH 204Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (UGE)3
     
    Professional studies (79 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    Family studies and human services (26 hours)
    FSHS 110Introduction to Human Development3
    FSHS 310Early Childhood3
    FSHS electives5
    FSHS 400Family and Consumer Economics3
    FSHS 506Middle Childhood and Adolescence3
    FSHS 510Human Development and Aging3
    FSHS 550The Family3
    FSHS 670Working with Parents3
     
    Integrative studies (9 hours)
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    University general education elective (300 level or above)3
     
    Social work professional courses (44 hours)
    SOCWK 010Introduction to Social Work Major
    SOCWK 260Introduction to Social Work3
    SOCWK 510Social Welfare as a Social Institution3
    SOCWK 515Human Behavior in the
    Social Environment3
    SOCWK 519Methods of Social Work Research4
    SOCWK 525Human Behavior in the Social Environment II3
    SOCWK 550Field Practicum Research2
    SOCWK 560Social Work Practice I3
    SOCWK 561Social Work Practice II3
    SOCWK 562Field Experience10
    SOCWK 564Social Work Professional Seminar2
    SOCWK 565Program and Policy Formulation and Analysis3
    SOCWK 568Social Work Practice III3
    SOCWK 570Social Work with Groups I1
    SOCWK 571Social Work with Groups II1
     
    Total for graduation131-132
     
    See Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, College of Arts and Sciences, regarding acceptance into the social work component of this program.
     
    Family studies and human services courses
    FSHS 100. Family Financial Planning as a Career. (1) I. This course is an introduction to career opportunities in the field of financial planning for families with an emphasis on academic preparation, acquisition of professional credentials, and career opportunities. A survey of the history, scope, and trends of the financial planning industry will be explored.

    FSHS 105. Introduction to Personal and Family Finance. (3) I, II. Fundamental principles for making financial decisions. Analysis and evaluation of personal and family money management strategies.

    University General Education courseFSHS 110. Introduction to Human Development. (3) I, II, S.. A study of life span human development through an individual's awareness and understanding of his or her own physical, social, and psychological growth and relationships with family, peers, and others.

    FSHS 200. Sexuality and Health. (2) I, II. Introduction to human sexuality and health, including sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS. Attributes of comprehensive programs, K-12, that incorporate state-defined goals for sexuality education and health needs of children and adolescents.

    FSHS 300. Problems in Family Studies and Human Services. (Var.) I, II, S. Independent or small group study. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 301. The Helping Relationship. (2-3) I. II, S. Characteristics of the helping relationship; consideration of personal qualities necessary for recognizing needs of individuals and families; identification of effective procedures for referral to appropriate professions and agencies. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 110; FSHS, GNHE, and FCSED majors only.

    FSHS 302. Introduction to Human Sexuality. (3), I, II. Study of the role and meaning of sexuality in human relationships across the life course.

    FSHS 310. Early Childhood. (3) I, II, S. Principles of growth and development of children from conception through age five, including familial, societal, and other ecological factors affecting young children's development. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 110.

    FSHS 312. Infant Observation Lab. (1) I, II. Observation of the behavior and development of children from infancy through toddlerhood. Prior or concurrent enrollment with FSHS 310.

    FSHS 313. Preschool Child Lab. (1) I, II. On sufficient demand. Observation of the development and guidance of children from 18 months to five years of age, with emphasis on observation of children in groups. Prior or concurrent enrollment with FSHS 310.

    FSHS 343. Communication Sciences and Disorders. (3) I. A survey of normal communication processes and communication disorders and an introduction to the fields of speech pathology and audiology that are responsible for the clinical management of these disorders.

    FSHS 347. Introduction to Phonetics. (3) I. Basic information about speech sounds and their use in human languages, including physiological, perceptual, and acoustic phonetics. Transcription of English will be emphasized. Conc. enrollment in FSHS 348 is required. Pr.: Junior standing.

    University General Education courseFSHS 350. Family Relationships and Gender Roles. (3) I, II, S. Effects of family interaction upon individual development and gender roles; consideration of premarital, marital, and parent-child relationships. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 110 or SOCIO 211.

    FSHS 360. Anatomy of the Speech Mechanism. (4) II. Anatomy of the structures involved in speech production. The course includes histology of the larynx and an overview of speech physiology. Pr.: Junior standing.

    FSHS 361. Hearing Science. (3) I. An introduction to hearing science concepts. Areas of focus include anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, quantification of sound, sound generation, and sound transmission. Information on the role of the auditory system in the encoding and processing of simple and complex signals is also presented. Pr.: Junior standing.

    FSHS 400. Family and Consumer Economics. (3) I. Issues and problems confronting consumers. Emphasis on current economic issues and their potential for impacting families and society. Pr.: ECON 110 or conc. enrollment; FSHS, GNHE, and FCSED majors only or by permission.

    FSHS 405. Advanced Personal and Family Finance. (3) II. In-depth applications of personal and family money management principles with emphasis on credit, savings, insurance, and budgeting. Pr.: FSHS 105.

    FSHS 415. Manual Communication. (3) I, II. Study of background information in current trends in the use of sign language. Restricted to sign language used in the United States. Includes instruction in the American Manual Alphabet and Vocabulary for about 700 signs. Primary focus will be application of beginning skills for communication with those who depend on this form of communication.

    FSHS 420. Interaction Techniques with Young Children. (3) I, S. A developmental approach to the acquisition of interaction techniques conducive to healthy emotional and self-concept growth in the child from birth to five years. Two hours lec. and one hour lab. Pr.: FSHS 310.

    FSHS 440. Human Development Facilitation. (2) I, II. Applied study of leadership skills in small discussion groups, with emphasis on learning and facilitating Introduction to Human Development concepts. Taken conc. with FSHS 441. Pr.: FSHS 110, preparatory workshop, and consent of instructor.

    FSHS 441. Human Development Facilitation Lab. (1) I, II. Recitation group leader for FSHS 110. Assists students in discussion and preparing group presentations; evaluates written work and course participation of students in group. Conc. with FSHS 440.

    FSHS 442. Developmental Psycholinguistics. (3) I. Review of research and theory of early development of language comprehension and production, involving vocalization, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Includes discussion of the relationship between cognition and language, as well as other variables influencing language acquisition. Pr.: FSHS 347 or conc. enrollment.

    FSHS 443. Language Assessment and Intervention I. (3) II. The characteristics and nature of language disorders in the preschool-age populations, as well as general principles of language assessment and intervention are presented. Specific language assessment and intervention procedures for individuals 0-8 years of age are reviewed. Communication profiles associated with a variety of language impairments are examined. Pr.: FSHS 442 and junior standing.

    FSHS 446. Disorders of Articulation and Phonology. (3) II. Theory, research, and principles of (a) normal/abnormal phonetic and phonologic development, (b) assessment of speech sound disorders, and (c) intervention for speech sound disorders. Pr.: FSHS 347 and junior standing.

    FSHS 499. Independent Study in Family Economics. (Var.) I, II, S. Independent study. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 506. Middle Childhood and Adolescence. (3) I, S. Principles of growth and development during middle childhood and adolescence, including familial, societal, and other ecological factors affecting development of youth. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 110.

    FSHS 507. Middle Childhood Lab. (1) I. Analysis of situations facing children age six to twelve and design of interventions to enable these children to cope with these situations. Prior or conc. enrollment in FSHS 506.

    FSHS 508. Adolescent Lab. (1) I. Analysis of situations facing adolescents and design of interventions to enable adolescents to cope with these situations. Prior or conc. enrollment in FSHS 506.

    FSHS 510. Human Development and Aging. (3) I, S. Survey of issues, research, and problems in aging and human development throughout adulthood, with particu- lar emphasis upon the later years. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 280; FSHS majors only or by permission.

    FSHS 515. Laboratory in Acoustic Phonetics. (1) I. The study of speech perception and production through acoustic analysis. Laboratory experience in the use of computer-based speech analysis systems. Pr.: FSHS 347 and senior standing.

    FSHS 524. Professional Seminar in Early Childhood Education. (3) II. Examination of programs for young children, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. Implementation and evaluation of program models and related issues and research. Pr.: FSHS 310 or PSYCH 280.

    FSHS 528. Exceptional Development in Early Childhood. (3) II. Exceptional development in early childhood (birth to five years), including sensory impairments, physical impairments, communication disorders, mental retardation, behavioral problems, and gifted performance; formal and informal assessment in all developmental areas; the family's role in the assessment/referral/intervention process. Pr.: FSHS 310.

    FSHS 540. Curriculum for Cognitive and Language Development of Young Children. (3) I. Planning for the enhancement of cognitive and language development. The application of child development theory to the planning of programs for young children within the major curriculum areas. Conc. with FSHS 545 or 546. Prior or conc. with FSHS 565. Pr.: FSHS 310 and 313 and admission into teacher education.

    FSHS 541. Curriculum for Emotional, Social, and Physical Development of Young Children. (3) II. Planning for the enhancement of physical, social, and emotional development. The application of child development theory to the planning of programs for young children within the major curriculum areas. Conc. with FSHS 545 or 546. Pr.: FSHS 310 and 313 and admission into teacher education.

    FSHS 545. Early Childhood Program Lab I. (1) I, II. Application of principles and techniques to planning, implementing, and evaluating developmentally-appropriate activities for young children in a supervised lab setting and in recitation sessions. Conc. with FSHS 540 or 541. Pr.: FSHS 310 and 313 and admission into teacher education.

    FSHS 546. Early Childhood Program Lab II. (2) I, II. Advanced application of principles and techniques for developmentally-appropriate programs for young children. Planning, implementing, and evaluating activities in a supervised lab setting. Conc. with FSHS 540 or 541. Pr.: FSHS 545 and admission into teacher education.

    FSHS 549. Clinical Procedures in Communication Disorders. (3) II. Orientation to clinical practicum. Opportunities for clinical observation of speech, language, and hearing evaluation and treatment. Study of diagnostic tools, treatment materials, equipment, and clinical procedure. Pr.: FSHS 443 and 446 and senior standing.

    FSHS 550. The Family. (3) I. Consideration of the family throughout the family life cycle; developmental tasks at each stage. Use and impact of family support services. Pr.: FSHS 350, 12 hours in FSHS; FSHS and GNHE majors only.

    FSHS 552. Families and Diversity. (3) I. Selected topics for understanding families in multiple contexts. Implications for professionals working with individuals and families. Pr.: Family life and community services majors only, 15 FSHS credits, FSHS 550, senior standing.

    FSHS 560. Clinical Research in Communication Sciences and Disorders. (3) I. Logic and methods of clinical research, with emphasis on those most frequently used in speech-language pathology and audiology. Experience formulating, doing, and evaluating research. Pr.: STAT 330 or equiv.

    FSHS 565. Language Development. (3) Survey of the development of speech and language skills in children. Pr.: FSHS 310 or EDEL 300.

    FSHS 567. Basic Audiology. (3) II. An introduction to audiology concepts and basic audiology testing procedures. Areas covered include disorders of the auditory system, testing procedures, and audiometric interpretation. Pr.: FSHS 361.

    FSHS 579. Pre-Directed Field Experience Orientation. (1) I, II. Consideration and application of professional knowledge and skills necessary for selection and placement in a social agency for a supervised experience in direct service to clients. Pr.: FSHS 110, 301, 350, 550; one of the following three courses: FSHS 310, 506, or 510; senior standing; 2.5 minimum GPA in FSHS foundation and professional courses; family life and community services majors only.

    FSHS 580. Directed Field Experience. (8) I, II, S. A block field placement in local agencies. Faculty-supervised experience in direct service to clients: individuals, groups, and communities. Weekly seminar during placement emphasizes theory underlying the practice. Pr.: FSHS 110, 301, 350, 550, 579; one of the following three courses: FSHS 310, 506, or 510; senior standing; 2.5 minimum GPA in FSHS foundation and professional courses; family life and community services majors only.

    FSHS 585. Professional Seminar in Family Life Education. (3) I, II, S. Consideration of professional philosophy, identity, ethics, career development, and characteristics of client populations. Development of skills for family life educators working in agencies with various socioeconomic, age, and ethnic groups. Pr.: Conc. enrollment in FSHS 580.

    FSHS 589. Administration of Early Childhood Programs. (3) I. Rationale for and techniques of administering programs for preschool children, including health, education, social services, parent involvement. Pr.: Nine hours in FSHS or other social science and junior standing.

    FSHS 590. Proseminar in Family Studies and Human Services. (1-3) On sufficient demand. Review of specific issues or professional practices affecting children and/or families. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    FSHS 591. Undergraduate Topics in Communication Sciences and Disorders. (1-3) Review of current topics in speech-language pathology and/or audiology. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours with a change in topic. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 595. Professional Seminar in Family Financial Planning. (3) II. Examination of professional issues in family financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, communication skills, and professional responsibility. Development of skills needed for family financial planners working with families in meeting their financial needs. Pr.: Senior standing and FSHS 405.

    FSHS 598. Directed Experiences in Early Childhood Education. (8) I, II, S. Participation in a preschool program: planning, instruction, evaluation. Prearrangement and consent of instructor required. Pr.: FSHS 420, 540, 541, 545, 546, and admission into teacher education.

    FSHS 600. Economic Status of Women. (3) On sufficient demand. Socioeconomic factors affecting the economic roles of women. Income, wealth, discrimination, employment, household production, and attitudes as they pertain to the economic position of women in society. Pr.: Junior standing and ECON 110.

    FSHS 603. Coping with Life Crises. (3) Examination of the effects of human competencies and coping strategies on successful adaptation to anticipated life crises, developmental transitions, and sudden, unexpected life events. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH and 6 hours of social science.

    FSHS 605. Communication Disorders and Aging. (3) An introduction to the most common communication disorders of older persons. Appropriate service delivery models and special needs of the elderly are discussed. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 615. Manual Communication II. (3) Instruction in an additional 400 to 500 signs in the SEE system. Introduction to elementary ASL techniques. Discussion of other augmentative communication systems. Research will be conducted in the use of various manual communication systems with special populations, including aphasic, language disabled, mentally handicapped, and others. Pr.: FSHS 415 or basic sign language skills.

    FSHS 624. Fundamentals of Family Financial Planning. (3) I. This course provides an overview of family financial planning by integrating concepts and issues with planning and counseling applications. Students will be introduced to the key concepts of family financial planning, including: insurance, tax, investments, retirement, and estate planning. The family financial planning process is introduced with an emphasis on the integration and application of concepts in meeting individual and family financial goals and objectives. Other topics presented include an ethics overview, compensation trends within the industry, and regulatory frameworks.

    FSHS 652. Black Families. (2-3) I. Selected topics for understanding life styles of black families. Implications for professionals working with black children and families. Pr.: Nine hours in FSHS or other social science and junior standing.

    FSHS 654. Death and the Family. (2-3) Exploration of contemporary attitudes toward death and dying; related influences on individual development and family life. Pr.: FSHS 550 or SOCIO 640.

    University General Education courseFSHS 670. Working with Parents. (3) II, S. Approaches to parenting and parent education with emphasis on programmatic implications of life-span developmental principles within a family context. Pr.: FSHS 110; and FSHS 350 or 550.

    FSHS 675. Field Study in Family Economics. (1-3) I, II. Supervised experiences in financial planning, financial counseling, community action, or consumer services. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 700. Problems in Family Studies and Human Services. (Var.) I, II, S. Independent study on aspects of human development and family studies. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    FSHS 704. Seminar in Family Studies and Human Services. (Var.) I. Interpretation and evaluation of information on varied topics relating to family members. May be taken for a maximum of nine hours. Pr.: Nine hours of FSHS or other social science.

    FSHS 705. Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology. (1-3) I, II, S. Supervised practice in the use of the methods and materials of speech-language pathology. Pr.: FSHS 449 and consent of instructor.

    FSHS 706. Practicum in Audiology. (1-3) I, II, S. Supervised practice in the use of equipment, materials, and methods of audiology. Pr.: FSHS 567 or conc. enrollment and consent of instructor.

    FSHS 708. Topics in Family Studies and Human Services. (2-3) I, II, S. Review of recent research and theory related to exploration of methods and family and interpersonal processes. Pr.: Consent of instructor. May be taken more than one semester.

    FSHS 709. Public Policy and Family Economic Well-Being. (3) I. Analysis of conceptual models for policy choices. Impact of socioeconomic and public policy factors on family economic well-being including special issues faced by financially disadvantaged and nontraditional households. Pr.: Nine hours in FSHS or other social science.

    FSHS 710. Child Care: Components and Issues. (2-3) Resources and facilities of quality child care; exploration of methods and philosophies of such programs; designed for those working with paraprofessional child care personnel. Pr.: Fifteen hours of either social science and/or FSHS.

    FSHS 711. Foundations of Youth Development. (1) I. This course examines the fundamentals of youth development and the youth development profession. Through this introduction to the field, students will explore the ethical, professional, and historical elements of youth development as it has evolved toward professionalism.

    FSHS 712. Community Youth Development. (3) I. Community Youth Development focuses upon the national emphasis of a strength-based or asset approach to community youth development. Emphasis is placed upon research, theory, and practice applied in communities throughout the U.S. Students will explore existing models, theoretical and applied literature, and current community efforts as a basis for understanding community youth development.

    FSHS 713. Adolescents and Their Families: Implications for Youth Professionals. (3) II. This course covers adolescent development as it is related to and intertwined with family development. The reciprocal influences between adolescents and their families will be examined. Working with youth vis a vis the family system will be highlighted.

    FSHS 714. Program Design, Evaluation, and Implementation. (3) II. This course is an overview of the program development process and outcome evaluation of community, children, and family programs. Modes of outcome scholarship and their implications for community-based programs are discussed. Students will develop knowledge through participating in a community-based project involving the practical application of program design and evaluation methods.

    FSHS 715. Youth Issues and Life Skills. (2) S. This course will present three strands: issues faced by youth today and associated risk and resiliency factors; life skills for youth; and helping skills necessary for youth professionals who work with young people.

    FSHS 716. Contemporary Youth Issues. (1) S. This course is designed to review the causes and consequences of youth violence and the programs and policies for prevention and intervention.

    FSHS 717. Youth Policy. (3) I. This course examines various federal and state policies designed specifically for youth. The course will be divided into three sections: (a) what is policy and what youth policies exist? (b) policies specifically designed to "protect the well-being" of youth (e.g., zero tolerance, restorative justice, juvenile justice and reform), (c) targeted youth policies (e.g., foster care, policies for youth with disabilities, homeless youth).

    FSHS 718. Youth Professionals as Consumers of Research. (3) II. This course is designed to help youth development professionals understand and apply research results and theories to practice. Emphasis will be placed on research and theory reports related to the youth development with particular attention to research procedures and outcomes.

    FSHS 719. Program Administration and Management. (3) II. This course is designed to introduce students to the development, administration, and management of youth-serving organizations.

    FSHS 720. Youth Development. (3) S. This course is designed to introduce students to the development period of adolescence. The theory and research of positive youth development will be the lens through which this developmental period is examined. Through a critical examination of the theoretical and research literature, the course will help students recognize and become familiar with the major issues and transitions adolescents face as they successfully navigate this developmental stage.

    FSHS 722. Youth and Cultural Contexts. (3) I. This course will provide an understanding of the cultural heritage of differing family structures, types, and social and educational processes experienced by youth in these families through in-depth reading, writing, discussion, critical listening, viewing of contemporary videos, and informal interviews with youth. Students will gain further knowledge of how ethnic groups fit historically into our society, and the results of how history has shaped our present-day situation.

    FSHS 725. Augmentative and Alternative Communication. (2) II. This course examines the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) from theoretical and practical perspectives. The etiologies and communicative needs of current and prospective AAC system users, as well as procedures used in evaluation, are addressed. Strategies and procedures for implementing AAC systems in education and acute care/rehabilitative settings are discussed. Opportunities for experience with state-of-the-art technology in AAC are provided at the Capper Foundation. Pr.: FSHS 443, 446, 449, and 705 or conc. enrollment.

    FSHS 728. Assessment of Young Children. (3) I. Theory and practice of individual assessment of handicapped and normal children, infancy to age eight, including cognitive, language, fine and gross motor, social, and self-help skills. Focus on selection, administration, interpretation, and evaluation of screening and comprehensive evaluation instruments for assessment and individual program planning. Pr.: FSHS 310.

    FSHS 735. Clinical Speech Science. (3) I. Research and theory dealing with the physiological and acoustic aspects of speech production. Instrumentation and procedures for observing and measuring aspects of speech breathing, phonation, velopharyngeal function, and articulation will be discussed. Pr.: FSHS 360.

    FSHS 740. Play Facilitation. (3) II. The emphasis on this course is the empirical study and practice of play as an educational, evaluative, and therapeutic intervention with young children. Pr.: FSHS 540 or consent of instructor.

    FSHS 741. Fluency Disorders. (3) I. Research and theory concerning etiology, characteristics, assessment, and treatment of individuals with disfluency problems. Pr.: FSHS 560.

    FSHS 742. Language Assessment and Intervention II. (3) II. Theory and research concerning language disorders in school-aged children are presented. Specific language assessment and intervention methodologies for this population are reviewed. Dialectal and bilingual considerations for assessment and intervention are addressed. Pr.: FSHS 443.

    FSHS 744. Aural Rehabilitation. (4) S. Study of and techniques for the habilitation or rehabilitation of speech and language problems of the hearing impaired. Pr.: FSHS 567.

    FSHS 745. Neuromotor Speech Disorders. (3) I. An introduction to motor speech disorders including an overview of the neurological system. Research and practical knowledge concerning etiologies, evaluation, and principles of treatment are addressed. Pr.: FSHS 360.

    FSHS 750. Voice Disorders. (3) II. Research and theory dealing with the etiologies, characteristics, assessment, and management of individuals with laryngeal disorders. Pr.: FSHS 735.

    FSHS 756. Financial Counseling. (3) S. Theory and research regarding the interactive process between the client and the practitioner, including communication techniques, motivation and esteem building, the counseling environment, ethics, and methods of data intake, verification, and analysis. Other topics include legal issues, compensation, uses of technology to identify resources, information management, and current or emerging issues.

    FSHS 758. Housing/Real Estate. (3) I. An overview of the role of housing and real estate in the family financial planning process from a theoretical perspective. Taxation, legal aspects, mortgages, and financial calculations related to home ownership and real estate investments are included. New and emerging issues in the context of housing and real estate will be emphasized. The role of ethics in family financial planning with housing and real estate also will be included.

    FSHS 760. Families, Employment Benefits, and Retirement Planning. (3) I. Study of micro and macro considerations for retirement planning. Survey of various types of retirement plans, ethical considerations in providing retirement planning services, assessing and forecasting financial needs in retirement, and integration of retirement plans with government benefits. Pr.: FSHS 405.

    FSHS 762. Investing for the Family's Future. (3) I. An in-depth study of investment options for clients, this course will include common stocks, fixed income securities, convertible securities, and related choices. Relationships between investment options and employee/employer benefit plan choices will be studied. Current and emerging issues and ethics will be an integral part of the course.

    FSHS 764. Estate Planning for Families. (3) II. Introduction to fundamentals of the estate planning process. Includes property transfer, tax consequences, probate avoidance, powers of appointment, and various tools/techniques used in implementing an effective estate plan. Pr.: FSHS 405.

    FSHS 766. Insurance Planning for Families. (3) II. An in-depth study of risk management concepts, tools, and strategies for individuals and families, including: life insurance; property and casualty insurance; liability insurance; accident, disability, health, and long-term care insurance; and government-subsidized management will be discussed. Case studies will provide experience in selecting insurance products suitable for individuals and families.

    FSHS 770. Economics of Aging. (3) On sufficient demand. Analysis of economic factors associated with aging; implications for individuals, society, and the economy. Pr.: Nine hours of FSHS or other social sciences.

    FSHS 772. Personal Income Taxation. (3) II. This course provides in-depth information of income tax practices and procedures including tax regulations, tax return preparation, the tax audit process, the appeals process, preparation for an administrative or judicial forum, and ethical considerations of taxation. New and emerging issues related to taxation will be covered. Family/individual case studies provide practice in applying and analyzing tax information and recommending appropriate tax strategies.

    FSHS 775. Perspectives in Gerontology. (3) I, II, S (Upon demand). Exploration of basic concepts in gerontology through current and classic research. Themes and issues include stereotypes and myths of aging, theories of aging, research approaches in aging, and related social issues facing the elderly.

    FSHS 776. Program Evaluation and Research Methods in Gerontology. (3) I, II, S (Upon demand). Overview of program evaluation, research methods, and grant writing in gerontology. Includes application of quantitative and qualitative methods in professional settings.

    FSHS 777. Public Policy: Economic and Social Impacts on Older Adults. (3) I, II, S (Upon demand). Study of policy development and public policy programs associated with aging. Attention is given to the impact of policies on older adults and economic impacts of and for an aging population.

    FSHS 778. Aging and the Family. (3) I, II, S (Upon demand). Investigates the issues that relate to family life in the later years from the perspective of older adults, the family, and society.

    FSHS 779. Professional Seminar in Gerontology. (3) I, II, S (Upon demand). Students apply and integrate knowledge gained in earlier courses and strengthen skills in ethical decisionmaking through applications in gerontology-related areas such as advocacy, professionalism, family, and workplace issues. Students from a variety of professions bring their unique perspectives to bear on topics of common interest.

    Topics within Human Ecology:
    dDegree Programs dApparel, Textiles, and Interior Design dHotel, Restaurant, Institution Management and Dietetics
    dGeneral Requirements dFamily Studies and Human Services dHuman Nutrition
    dProgram Options dGeneral Human Ecology   
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    Kansas State University
    August 19, 2005