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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2004-2006
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    University Faculty
     

    Modern Languages

    Robert Corum, Head

    Professors Corum, Dehon, Kolonosky, Oropesa, and Ossar; Associate Professors Arnds, Benson, Clark, Garavito, Sauter, and Shaw; Assistant Professors Hillard, Torrico, and Wiebe; Instructor Pigno; Emeriti: Alexander, Driss, Miller, and Tunstall.

    E-mail: modlang@ksu.edu
    www.ksu.edu/mlangs

    All regular courses offered by the Department of Modern Languages may be taken by nonmajors on an A/Pass/F basis, subject to the provisions of the university policy. Language laboratories are offered only on a Credit/ No-Credit basis.

    Students majoring in languages should enroll for the bachelor of arts degree.

    Within the modern language major, French, German, and Spanish are offered; in highly unusual cases, a major in classics or Russian may be arranged.

    Major
    A major consists of classes above the 100 level taken in the same language. Students majoring in a modern language must either (a) receive a grade of C or higher in all courses counted toward the major or (b) have a GPA of at least 2.50 in all courses counted toward the major. Note: Literature courses in translation may not be applied toward the major.

    French: 32 hours
    Required:

    FREN 520 and FREN 521: Introduction to French Literature I and II
    At least three 700-level literature courses

    German: 30 hours
    Required:

    GERM 521 and GERM 522: Introduction to German Literature I and II
    At least three 700-level courses

    Spanish: 33 hours
    Note: Elementary Conversation 3A (262) and 4A (264) do not count toward the major.

    Required:

    SPAN 570: Structure of the Spanish Language
    SPAN 563 and 567: Introduction to the Literature of Spanish America and Spain (take in either order)
    At least three 700-level courses, one each in Spanish literature, Spanish American literature, and Hispanic culture/ language.

    Major option ``with distinction''
    (3.5 GPA in all courses taken toward the major)

    French: 38 hours
    Required, in addition to the regular major:
    Two additional courses, one of which must be at the 700 level.

    German: 36 hours
    Required, in addition to the regular major:
    Two additional courses, one of which must be at the 700 level.

    Spanish: 39 hours
    Required, in addition to the regular major:
    Spanish or Spanish American Civilization (SPAN 565 or 566)
    One additional 700-level Spanish course, any category

    Minor
    A minor consists of classes above the 100 level taken in the same language. Students minoring in a language must either (a) receive a grade of C or higher in all courses counted toward the minor or (b) have a GPA of at least 2.50 in all courses counted toward the minor. The minor must include one literature course, except in Japanese. See recommended literature courses in parentheses:

    Note: Literature courses in translation may not be applied toward the minor.

    French: 20 hours (FREN 520 or 521, Introduction to French Literature I or II)

    German: 18 hours (GERM 521 or 522, Introduction to Literature I or II)

    Japanese: 18 hours (no literature course required)

    Spanish: 21 hours (SPAN 574, Hispanic Readings) Note: in Spanish, Elementary Conversation 3A (262) and 4A (264) do not count toward the minor.
    Double majors and dual degrees
    Students are encouraged to combine their modern language major with a major in a different field or college. To accomplish this, the student needs to complete the requirements for a B.A. in modern languages as well as those for the other major or degree.

    Entering students who have had previous language experience and who plan to continue language study are required to take a language placement examination before or at the beginning of the first semester of language study. If there is any doubt as to proper placement, the head of the Department of Modern Languages should be consulted.

    Students wishing to acquire retroactive credit for language proficiency gained before coming to K-State should consult with the head of the Department of Modern Languages.

    Financial aid
    The department offers scholarships to undergraduate majors and double majors for study at K-State or on the study abroad programs. For details, contact the head of the Department of Modern Languages.

    Programs abroad
    The department sponsors summer study programs in France, Germany, Mexico, and Spain. All inquiries should be addressed to the head of the department.

    In addition, students may choose to participate in other programs, such as the International Student Exchange Program, the ERASMUS program, or the Community Service Program.

    Honors program courses
    University General Education courseMLANG 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) I. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy which have been of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Considerable emphasis is placed on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. Limited to entering freshman students. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 297, HIST 297, PHIL 297.

    University General Education courseMLANG 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) II. Continuation of MLANG 297. Pr.: MLANG 297 or consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 298, HIST 298, PHIL 298.

    University General Education courseMLANG 399. Honors Seminar in Modern Languages. (1-3) Reading and discussion of selected masterpieces of European literature in English translation. Open to non-language majors in the honors program.

    MLANG 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) I, II, S. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

    Modern language courses
    MLANG 001. Study Abroad. (0)

    MLANG 110. Hebrew for Beginners. (2) An introduction to the Hebrew language and the culture of the people who speak the language. This general introduction includes skill development in reading, writing, and speaking basic Hebrew. Designed specifically for English-speaking students. To be offered during Intersessions only.

    MLANG 507. European Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from the major authors of Europe and the Spanish-speaking world.

    MLANG 710. Introduction to Foreign Language Pedagogy. (3) The fundamentals of language learning as described by current research, and teaching strategies, that facilitate the acquisition of foreign language skills. Taught in English. Pr.: Acceptance as GTA or instructor in ML.

    FREN 502. French Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English of works representing important literary trends. May be taken by majors and minors if all assignments are completed in French.

    FREN 509. French Phonetics. (1) I, II. The fundamentals of French phonetics. Intensive practice in diction. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

    FREN 510. Modern French Culture. (2) French culture since World War II with special emphasis on social, economic, historical, and artistic developments of that period. Taught in English. Not accepted for major credit in French.

    University General Education courseGRMN 503. German Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from such major German authors as Thomas Mann, Brecht, Hesse, Grass, and Kafka. Not accepted for major credit in German.

    LATIN 501. Classical Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from the works of such major classical authors as Homer, Euripides, Vergil, Horace, and Terence.

    RUSSN 250. Russian Culture and Civilization. (3) Russia's past and present in the light of principal ideologies with emphasis upon fine art, literature, music, religion, politics, and education. Equal time will be devoted to the Tsarist and Soviet periods. Knowledge of Russian is not required. Same as HIST 250.

    RUSSN 504. Russian Literature in Translation: The Nineteenth Century. (3) Survey of the principal writers of Tsarist Russia with emphasis on Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.

    RUSSN 508. Russian Literature in Translation: The Soviet Period. (3) The development of Russian literature since the Revolution, with emphasis on Mayakovsky, Sholokov, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn.

    SPAN 505. Spanish Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from the works of such major Spanish and Latin American authors as García Lorca, Borges, Neruda, and García Márquez. Not accepted for major credit in Spanish.

    Arabic courses
    ARAB 181. Arabic I. (4) Introduction to the structure of modern Arabic. Essentials of grammar, speaking, reading, and writing.

    ARAB 182. Arabic II. (4) Continuation of Arabic I. Pr.: ARAB 181 or equiv.

    ARAB 281. Arabic III. (4) Further development of language skills. Pr.: ARAB 182 or equiv.

    ARAB 282. Arabic IV. (3) Continuation of Arabic III. Pr.: ARAB 281 or equiv.

    ARAB 540. Special Studies in Arabic. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of the department head and instructor involved.

    Chinese courses
    CHINE 101. Chinese I. (4) I. Introduction to the fundamental linguistics and cultural characteristics of the Chinese language and its writing systems.
    CHINE 102. Chinese II. (4) II. Continuation of Chinese I. Development of functional skills for familiar situations. Pr.: CHINE 101.
    CHINE 201. Chinese III. (4) I. Continuation of Chinese II. Further development of functional skills. Intensive practice of spoken and written Chinese. Pr.: CHINE 102.
    CHINE 202. Chinese IV. (4) II. Continuation of Chinese III. Presentation of more advanced elements of the Chinese language, with intensive practice of spoken and written Chinese. Pr.: CHINE 201.
    French courses
    FREN 001. Orientation for Summer School Program. (0)

    University General Education courseFREN 111. French I. (5) Introduction to the structure of modern French, emphasizing the spoken language with practice in the language laboratory.

    University General Education courseFREN 112. French II. (5) Continuation of French I, completion of basic presentation of the structure of French. Emphasis on spoken language, use of language lab. Pr.: FREN 111 or equiv.

    University General Education courseFREN 211. French III. (5) Continuation of French II, presentation of more advanced elements of the French language. Emphasis on spoken language, use of the language lab. Pr.: FREN 112 or equiv.

    University General Education courseFREN 213. French IV. (4) Continuation of French III, presentation of more advanced elements of the French language. Emphasis on spoken language, use of the language lab. Pr.: FREN 211 or equiv.

    FREN 215. Elementary French Conversation. (2) I, II. Practice in basic conversational French. Normally taken concurrently with FREN 211 or 213. May be taken twice. Pr.: FREN 112 or equiv.

    FREN 398. Intermediate Studies in French. (1-6) Offered only to participants in study abroad programs. Prior consultation for approval is expected. At the discretion of the department, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    FREN 502. French Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English of works representing important literary trends. May be taken by majors and minors if all assignments are completed in French.

    FREN 509. French Phonetics. (1) I, II. The fundamentals of French phonetics. Intensive practice in diction. Pr.: FREN 213 or eqiv.

    FREN 510. Modern French Culture. (2) French culture since World War II with special emphasis on social, economic, historical, and artistic developments of that period. Taught in English. Not accepted for major credit in French.

    FREN 513. French Composition and Grammar. (3) Review in depth of the structure of the language. Intensive practice in written and conversational French. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

    University General Education courseFREN 514. French Civilization. (3) Introduction to French culture with special emphasis on social, historical, and artistic developments. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

    University General Education courseFREN 516. Readings in French. (3) Practice in reading a variety of literary, journalistic, and specialized texts from France and Francophone countries. Pr.: FREN 213.

    University General Education courseFREN 517. Commercial French. (3) Advanced grammar necessary for adequate oral and written expression in international business and diplomatic situations, including specialized terminology, conversation and discussion, and translation. Pr.: FREN 213.

    FREN 518. Advanced French Conversation. (3) II. Practice in spoken French, with emphasis on idiomatic expression. Course not open to students whose primary language is French and whose competence has been demonstrated in the language at this level. Pr.: FREN 213.

    FREN 519. Special Studies in French. (Var.) Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv. and consent of department head and instructor.

    University General Education courseFREN 520. Introduction to French Literature I. (3) The reading and discussion of major works of French literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. Pr.: French 516 or equiv.

    University General Education courseFREN 521. Introduction to French Literature II. (3) The reading and discussion of major works of French literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Pr.: FREN 516 or equiv.

    FREN 530. Topics in French Literature and Culture. (3) Provides the students the opportunity to investigate in detail a particular theme or genre in French literature or culture. May be repeated once with a change in focus and texts. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level.

    FREN 709. Medieval French Literature. (3) An introduction to literary forms, style, and thought from the eleventh century to the fifteenth century in France. Readings in modern French include Chanson de Roland, Chretien de Troyes Roman de la Rose, etc. Pr.: FREN 511 and 512 or equiv. background as determined by the modern language faculty.

    FREN 710. Sixteenth-Century French Literature. (3) Reading and discussion of selected prose and poetry of the French Renaissance. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 711. Seventeenth-Century French Literature I. (3) I. Various literary forms of the French Baroque period. Reading of representative texts by Corneille, Pascal, Descartes, and others. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 712. Seventeenth-Century French Literature II. (3) II. Various literary forms of the French classical period. Reading of representative texts by Molière, Racine, Lafayette, La Fontaine, and others. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 713. Eighteenth-Century French Literature. (3) Critical study of the literature of the Enlightenment. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 714. Romantic French Literature. (3) A study of preromanticism and romanticism. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 715. Realist French Literature. (3) A study of realism, naturalism, and symbolism. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 716. Twentieth-Century French Literature I. (3) The study of major themes and trends in the novel, drama, and poetry as reflected in representative works of such authors as Proust, Mauriac, Cocteau, Claudel, Valéry, and others. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 717. Twentieth-Century French Literature II. (3) Reading and analysis of recent innovations in literary theory and practice as found in the works of such authors as Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, and others. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 718. The French Novel. (3) The development of the novel from the seventeenth century to the present, seen through selected masterworks. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 719. Advanced Spoken and Written French. (3) II. An advanced, intensive study of French prose style. Introduction to the techniques of translation from English to French. Intensive practice in oral style and diction. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 720. Seminar in French. (3) A seminar with variable topics. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 742. French-Speaking Culture and Literature in Second-Language Learning. (3) Analysis and interpretation of cultural and literary texts from French-speaking countries, with emphasis on the development of interpretive skills and materials, and their application to the French curriculum at all levels. May be repeated once with a change in focus and texts. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    FREN 799. Problems in Modern Languages. Pr.: At least one course taught in French at the 500 level or equiv.

    German courses
    GRMN 002. Orientation for Summer School Program. (0)

    University General Education courseGRMN 121. German I. (5) Introduction to the structure of modern German. Practice of the spoken language with additional experience in the language lab.

    GRMN 122. German II. (5) Continuation to the introduction of modern German. Practice of the spoken language, additional experience in reading and with a variety of additional media. Pr.: GRMN 121 or equiv.

    University General Education courseGRMN 221. German III. (5) Conclusion of the introduction to modern German. Continued practice of the spoken language, reading, and additional experience with a range of audio and visual media. Pr.: GRMN 122 or equiv.

    GRMN 222. Elementary German Conversation IIIA. (2) Practice in beginning conversational German. Course not open to fluent speakers of German. Course normally taken concurrently with German III. Pr.: GRMN 122 or equiv.

    University General Education courseGRMN 223. German IV. (4) Review of select points of German languages structure accompanied by practice in conversation, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as additional experience with audio and visual media. Pr.: GRMN 221 or equiv.

    GRMN 224. German Conversation IVA. (2) Continued practice in conversational German. Course not open to fluent speakers of German. Normally taken concurrently with German IV. Pr.: GRMN 221 or equiv.

    GRMN 398. Intermediate Studies in German. (Var.) Offered only to participants in study abroad programs. Prior consultation for approval is expected. At the discretion of the department, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    University General Education courseGRMN 503. German Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from such major German authors as Thomas Mann, Brecht, Hesse, Grass, and Kafka. Not accepted for major credit in German.

    GRMN 520. Readings in German. (3) Practice in reading a variety of literary, journalistic, and specialized texts. Pr..: GRMN 223 or equiv.

    GRMN 521. Introduction to German Literature I. (3) Literary movements of the nineteenth century are introduced through the reading and discussion of texts in various forms and by representative authors. Pr.: GRMN 223 or equiv.

    GRMN 522. Introduction to German Literature II. (3) Discussion of significant works of twentieth-century prose, poetry, and drama. Special emphasis is placed on the literature of recent decades. Pr.: GRMN 223 or equiv.

    GRMN 523. German Composition. (3) A study of German syntax and exercises in composition. Pr.: GRMN 223 or equiv.

    GRMN 524. German for Reading Knowledge I. (3) The grammar and syntax of German and the reading of basic material selected from modern German texts. Not for fulfillment of humanities distribution requirement.

    GRMN 525. German for Reading Knowledge II. (3) Continued reading of material from modern German texts. Not for fulfillment of humanities distribution requirement. Pr.: GRMN 524 or equiv.

    GRMN 526. Business German. (3) Advanced grammar necessary for adequate oral and written expression in international business and diplomatic situations, including specialized terminology, conversation and discussion, and translation. Pr.: GRMN 523.

    GRMN 527. Advanced German Conversation. (3) Intensive practice in conversation. Course not open to students whose primary language is German and whose competence has been demonstrated in the language at this level. Pr.: GRMN 223 or equiv.

    GRMN 529. Special Studies in German. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of department head and instructor involved.

    GRMN 530. German Civilization. (3) II. The political and cultural development of the German-speaking peoples and their role and influence in the history of the Western world. Pr.: 18 hours of college German.

    GRMN 721. German Classicism. (3) I. Reading and discussion of late eighteenth-century texts, including works by Goethe, Schiller, Hoelderlin, etc. Pr.: 21 hours of college German or equiv.

    GRMN 722. German Romanticism. (3) II. A study of representative works of German romantic literature by such authors as Schlegel, Tieck, Eichendorff, Novalis. Pr.: 21 hours of college German or equiv.

    GRMN 723. Goethe and Faust. (3) I. The writings of Goethe and his masterpiece, Faust. Pr.: 21 hours of college German or equiv.

    GRMN 724. German Prose and Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (3) II. A consideration of post-romantic German literature with special emphasis on the novella. Authors including Grillparzer, Keller, and Meyer are discussed. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 725. Early Twentieth-Century German Literature. (3) II. A study of the drama and lyric of naturalism, neoclassicism, neo-romanticism, and expressionism. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 726. German Literature since 1945. (3) I. A discussion of the postwar writings of the Gruppe 47, Swiss playwrights, and others. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 727. The Modern German Novel. (3) II. Theory of the German novel with examples from authors such as Thomas Mann, Hesse, Grass, and others. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 728. History of the German Language. (3) I. A study of the development of the sounds, forms, and syntax of standard German. Fulfills distribution requirements for major. Pr.: Senior standing.

    GRMN 729. Seminar in German. (3) A seminar with variable topics, including literature of social and political protest, Austrian and Swiss literature, literature of the Middle Ages, émigré literature, etc. Pr.: Senior standing or consent of instructor.

    GRMN 731. Advanced Spoken and Written German. (3) Intensive practice in conversation and diction, with considerable practice in the writing of essays in German. Pr.: 24 hours of college German.

    GRMN 732. Methods in German Literary Criticism. (3) Introduction to the various theories of literary analysis. Interpretation of representative German texts. Pr.: 24 hours of college German.

    GRMN 733. The Enlightenment and Storm and Stress. (3) A study of representative texts from various movements in German literature and culture of the eighteenth century, including Empfindsamkeit and Rococo. Such authors as Gottsched, Klopstock, Lessing, Lichtenberg, Wieland, and the young Goethe and Schiller will be discussed. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 734. Literature of the German Democratic Republic. (3) A study of the literary developments within the German Democratic Republic. The course will consider the writers' role in a socialist society and their impact upon the cultural scene. Readings will include representative works from all genres. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 735. German Lyric Poetry. (3) A study of German lyric poetry from the Middle Ages to the present with special emphasis on the historical development of such genres as the lied, sonnet, and ballad. In addition to learning basic interpretive techniques intrinsic to poetry, the student will learn to identify the literary periods. Pr.: 21 hours of college German.

    GRMN 740. German Culture and Literature in Second-Language Learning. (3) Analysis and interpretation of cultural and literary texts from German-speaking countries, with emphasis on the development of interpretive skills and materials, and their application to the German curriculum at all levels. May be repeated once with a change in focus and texts. Pr.: 24 credits in German at 200 or above or equiv.

    GRMN 799. Problems in Modern Languages. (Var.)

    Italian courses
    ITAL 129. Italian IL. (1) Language laboratory. Strongly recommended for students taking Italian I. Concurrent enrollment in Italian I required. For Credit/No Credit only. Credit given only upon receiving a passing grade for the concurrent section of Italian I.

    ITAL 130. Italian IIL. (1) Language laboratory. Strongly recommended for students taking Italian II. Concurrent enrollment in Italian II required. For Credit/No Credit only. Credit given only upon receiving a passing grade for the concurrent section of Italian II.

    ITAL 131. Italian I. (4) Introduction to the structure of modern Italian. Offered in alternate years.

    ITAL 132. Italian II. (4) Continuation and completion of the study of modern Italian grammar, using the facilities of the language laboratory for audiolingual practice. Pr.: ITAL 131 or equiv. Offered in alternate years.

    ITAL 231. Italian III. (4) Grammar review and reading selections from Italian literature. Pr.: ITAL 132 or equiv. Offered in alternate years.

    ITAL 232. Italian IV. (3) Selective review of grammar and reading of examples of modern Italian literature. Pr.: ITAL 231 or equiv. Offered in alternate years.

    ITAL 520. Special Studies in Italian. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of department head and instructor involved.

    Japanese courses
    JAPAN 191. Japanese I. (4) Introduction to the fundamental linguistics and cultural characteristics of the Japanese language and its writing systems (Hiragona, Katakana, and Kanji).

    JAPAN 192. Japanese II. (4) Continuation of Japanese I. Development of functional skills for familiar situations. Pr.: JAPAN 191 or equiv.

    JAPAN 291. Japanese III. (5) Introduction to grammatical patterns and sentence structure. Extensive practice of spoken and written Japanese, both in the classroom and thelanguage laboratory. Pr.: JAPAN 192 or equiv.

    JAPAN 292. Japanese IV. (5) Continuation of Japanese III. Enhancement of speaking and writing skills, and reading and listening comprehension. Practice in the language learning center included. Pr.: JAPAN 291 or equiv.

    JAPAN 591. Japanese V. (4) Development of communication skills through application activities such as problem-solving tasks and role plays. Enhancement of vocabulary, structures, and their usage. Emphasis on extended discourse. Pr.: JAPAN 292 or equiv.

    JAPAN 592. Japanese VI. (4) Continuation of Japanese V. Development of functional skills for general situations. Completion of the presentation of major 300 Kanji characaters and 1,000 Kanji compounds. Pr.: JAPAN 591 or equiv.

    JAPAN 599. Special Studies in Japanese. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of department head and instructor.

    Latin courses
    LATIN 105. Latin and Greek for Scientists. (1) The course is designed specifically to provide students of the biological sciences with a background in Latin and Greek roots of scientific terms. Emphasis on prefixes, suffixes, and word derivations. No prior knowledge of either Latin or Greek is required. Course may not be applied toward the fulfillment of either language or humanities requirements for any degree.

    LATIN 141. Latin I. (4) An introductory study of the structure of Latin. Offered in alternate years.

    LATIN 142. Latin II. (4) Continuation and completion of the study of the structure of Latin. Pr.: LATIN 141. Offered in alternate years.

    LATIN 241. Latin III. (4) Review of Latin grammar and reading of an anthology of Roman prose and poetry. Pr.: LATIN 142. Offered in alternate years.

    LATIN 242. Latin IV. (3) Continuation of the study of Latin syntax and grammar, based upon the reading of Roman prose and poetry. Pr.: LATIN 241. Offered in alternate years.

    LATIN 501. Classical Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from the works of such major classical authors as Homer, Euripides, Vergil, Horace, and Terence.

    LATIN 549. Special Studies in Latin. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of the department head and instructor involved.

    Linguistics courses
    LG 594. Comanche Texts. (3) I or II, in alternate years. General introduction to Comanche grammatical and discourse systems and study of oral narratives: published and unpublished texts including coyote stories, adventure stories, personal recollections, etc. Some attention to pronunciation, but major emphasis on the development of a basic reading ability and understanding of the world portrayed in the narratives. Same as LING 594.

    LG 595. Archeological Decipherment. (3) I or II, in alternate years. The art and science of four famous cases of decipherment: Mesopotamian cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphics, Creto-Mycenaean Linear B, and ongoing work of the Maya script. Characteristics of successful decipherments and resultant increases in knowledge about the history of writing and the richness of various cultures of the past. Same as LING 595.

    LG 600. Principles of Linguistics. (3) Same as LING 600 and ENGL 600.

    LG 601. General Phonetics. (3) Same as LING 601 and ENGL 601.

    LG 602. Historical Linguistics. (3) Same as LING 602 and ENGL 602.

    LG 603. Topics in Linguistics. (3) Same as LING 603 and ENGL 603.

    LG 730. Foundations of Semiotics. (3) II. The general theory of signs; detailed classification of signs and examination of several semiotic systems such as language, literature, culture, and society. The semiotics of communication and signification. Pr.: Senior standing.

    LG 792. Field Methods in Linguistics. (3) Same as LING 792.

    Portuguese courses
    PORT 163. Portuguese I. (4) I. Introduction to the structure of the Portuguese language, stressing Brazilian usage, and emphasizing oral and written skills.

    PORT 164. Portuguese II. (4) II. Continuation of Portuguese I, completion of the basic presentation of structural and linguistic principles of the Portuguese language. Pr.: PORT 163 or equiv. course.

    PORT 266. Portuguese III. (4) I. Intensive review of syntax and a comprehensive structural review of modern Portuguese, stressing Brazilian usage, with emphasis on composition and conversation. Pr.: PORT 164 or equiv.

    PORT 267. Portuguese IV. (3) II. Reading and discussion of selections from contemporary prose, emphasizing Brazilian writings, and review of grammatical structures as needed. Pr.: PORT 266 or equiv.

    PORT 572. Special Studies in Portuguese. (1-3) Pr.: 15 hours of Portuguese and consent of instructor.

    Russian courses
    RUSSN 149. Russian IL. (1) Language laboratory. Strongly recommended for students taking Russian I. Concurrent enrollment in Russian I required. For Credit/No Credit only. Credit given only upon receiving a passing grade for the concurrent section of Russian I.

    RUSSN 150. Russian IIL. (1) Language laboratory. Strongly recommended for students taking Russian II. Concurrent enrollment in Russian II required. For Credit/No Credit only. Credit given only upon receiving a passing grade for the concurrent section of Russian II.

    RUSSN 151. Russian I. (4) I. Introduction to the structure of modern Russian. Emphasis on the sounds of Russian, the use of the Cyrillic alphabet, and oral drills with added practice in the language laboratory.

    RUSSN 152. Russian II. (4) II. Continuation of the study of Russian grammar and oral communication. Pr.: RUSSN 151 or equiv.

    RUSSN 250. Russian Culture and Civilization. (3) Russia's past and present in the light of principal ideologies with emphasis upon fine art, literature, music, religion, politics, and education. Equal time will be devoted to the Tsarist and Soviet periods. Knowledge of Russian is not required. Same as HIST 250.

    RUSSN 251. Russian III. (4) I. Completion of the study of Russian grammar. Reading of selected prose on the intermediate level. Pr.: RUSSN 152 or equiv.

    RUSSN 252. Russian IV. (3) II. Intensive review of Russian grammar. Exercises in reading selected modern Russian texts in the original. Pr.: RUSSN 251 or equiv.

    RUSSN 398. Intermediate Studies in Russian. (Var.) Offered only to participants in study abroad programs. Prior consultation for approval is expected. At the discretion of the department, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    RUSSN 504. Russian Literature in Translation: The Nineteenth Century. (3) Survey of principal writers of Tsarist Russia with emphasis upon Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.

    RUSSN 508. Russian Literature in Translation: The Soviet Period. (3) The development of Russian literature since the Revolution, with emphasis upon Mayakovsky, Sholokhov, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn.

    RUSSN 551. Russian V. (3) Reading of Russian short stories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.

    RUSSN 552. Survey of Russian Literature. (3) A history of Russian literature from its beginnings until the present, with emphasis on the works of the nineteenth century, including those of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

    RUSSN 553. Russian Conversation and Composition. (3) Discussion in Russian. Extensive practice in writing Russian compositions.

    RUSSN 559. Special Studies in Russian. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of department head and instructor involved.

    South Asian languages courses
    URDU 171. Hindi/Urdu I. (4) I. Introduction to the structure of Hindi and Urdu, two languages which are nearly identical in the grammatical structure of their everyday spoken style. Hindi is the dominant language of northern India. Urdu is the national language of Pakistan, also understood throughout the Hindi area.

    URDU 172. Hindi/Urdu II. (4) II. Continuation of Hindi/Urdu I with introduction of the Devanagari (Hindi and Sanskrit) script. Pr.: URDU 171.

    URDU 273. Hindi/Urdu III. (4) I. Continuation of Hindi/Urdu II with gradual transition to more formal styles of language. Pr.: URDU 172.

    URDU 274. Hindi/Urdu IV. (4) II. Continuation of Hindi/Urdu III with readings in Hindi or Urdu literature according to needs of students. Pr.: URDU 273.

    URDU 575. Hindi/Urdu V. (4) I, II, S. Individual study in Hindi or Urdu. Readings, composition, or conversational practice relevant to the student's interests and disciplinary needs. May be repeated for credit. Pr.: URDU 274.

    URDU 799. Problems in Modern Languages. (Var.)

    Spanish courses
    SPAN 003. Orientation for Summer School Abroad Program in Zacatecas/Cuernavaca, Mexico. (0)

    University General Education courseSPAN 161. Spanish I. (5) Basic introduction to the structures of the Spanish language, emphasizing practice in the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing. Includes selected aspects of the cultures of Spanish speakers and practice in the language learning center.

    University General Education courseSPAN 162. Spanish II. (5) Continuation of Spanish I, Basic introduction to the structures of the Spanish language, emphasizing practice in the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing. Includes selected aspects of the cultures of Spanish speakers and practice in the language learning center. Pr.: SPAN 161 or equiv.

    University General Education courseSPAN 261. Spanish III. (5) Review of structures of the Spanish language, emphasizing intermediate-level practice in the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing. Includes selected aspects of the cultures of Spanish speakers and practice in the language learning center. Pr.: SPAN 162 or equiv.

    SPAN 262. Elementary Spanish Conversation IIIA. (2) Practice in beginning conversational Spanish. Emphasis on oral communication within the classroom. Course not open to fluent speakers. Should be taken concurrently with Spanish III.

    University General Education courseSPAN 263. Spanish IV. (4) Continuation of Spanish III. Review of structures of the Spanish language, emphasizing intermediate-level practice in the four skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing. Includes selected aspects of the cultures of Spanish speakers and practice in the language learning center. Pr.: SPAN 261 or equiv.

    SPAN 264. Elementary Spanish Conversation IVA. (2) Continuation of Elementary Spanish Conversation IIIA. Should be taken concurrently with Spanish IV.

    SPAN 398. Intermediate Studies in Spanish. (Var.) Offered only to participants in study abroad programs. Prior consultation for approval is expected. At the discretion of the department, the course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    SPAN 505. Spanish Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from the works of such major Spanish and Latin American authors as García Lorca, Borges, Neruda, and García Márquez. Not accepted for major credit in Spanish.

    SPAN 550. Introduction to Literature in Spanish. (3) An introduction to literary terminology and its practical application for analyzing and interpreting texts from Spain and Spanish America. Strongly recommended for students planning to take SPAN 563 or SPAN 567. Pr.: SPAN 564 or equiv.

    SPAN 563. Literature of Spanish America. (3) Reading and analysis of representative works of Spanish-American literature from the colonial period to the present. Pr.: Minimum of 3 hours at 500 level or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty. SPAN 550 strongly recommended.

    SPAN 564. Spanish Composition and Grammar. (3) The grammar and syntax of modern Spanish. Course not open to those students whose primary language is Spanish and whose competence has been demonstrated in the language at this level. Pr.: SPAN 263 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 565. Spanish Civilization. (3) Survey of Spanish culture and civilization from its beginnings to the present; emphasis on Spanish contributions over the centuries in the humanistic field. Pr.: SPAN 263 or equiv. facility as determined by the modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 566. Hispanic-American Civilization. (3) Survey of Spanish-American culture and civilization from 1492 to the present. Pr.: SPAN 263 or equiv. facility as detrmined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 567. Literature of Spain. (3) Reading and analysis of representative works of Spanish literature from its beginnings to the present. Pr.: Minimum of 3 hours at 500 level or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty. SPAN 550 strongly recommended.

    SPAN 569. Special Studies in Spanish. (Var.) Pr.: Consent of department head and instructor involved.

    SPAN 570. Structure of the Spanish Language. (3) Introductory description of the grammatical structure of Spanish with its main components: phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic. Spanish pronunciation, dialectal variation and some other aspects are analyzed in contrast. Pr.: SPAN 564 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 571. Advanced Spanish Conversation. (3) Intensive practice in conversation. Course not open to those students whose primary language is Spanish and whose competence has been demonstrated in the language at this level. Pr.: SPAN 263 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 573. Spanish for Professions. (3) Advanced grammar necessary for adequate oral and written expression in selected professional disciplines (such as business, health professions, and human services), including specialized terminology, conversation and discussion, and translation. Pr.: SPAN 564 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 574. Hispanic Readings. (3) Practice in reading a variety of literary, journalistic, and specialized texts. Pr.: SPAN 263 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 750. Spanish-American Literature from its Origins to the Nineteenth Century. (3) Analysis and discussion of literary manifestations from pre-Columbian civilizations, the Spanish colonies, and independent nations. Literary movements include early forms of narrative, the Baroque, Neo-Classicism, and Romanticism. Texts by writers such as Aztec poets, Spanish chroniclers, Sor Juana, Fernández de Lizardi, Hernández, Isaacs, Gómez de Avellaneda, Echeverría, and others. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. facility determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 751. Spanish-American Literature: Late Nineteenth Century to Early Twentieth Century. (3) Analysis and discussion of significant literary trends and movements, including Realism, Naturalism, ``Modernism,'' and the Avant-Garde, including writers such as Blest Gana, Cambaceres, Martí, Darío, Güiraldes, Azuela, Gallegos, Rivera, and Bombal. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 752. Contemporary Spanish-American Narrative. (3) Analysis and discussion of the narrative from the period of the Boom to the present. Includes writers such as Borges, Sábato, Cortázar, García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, Allende, and Valenzuela. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 755. Spanish-American Drama. (3) Analysis and discussion of the drama of Spanish-speaking American nations, with emphasis on the twentieth century. Readings from such leading playwrights as Usigli, Marquez, Carballido, Triana, Gambaro, Lenero, and Castellanos. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 756. Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) The reading and study of nineteenth-century Spanish literature: drama, essay, novel, poetry, and short story. Such authors as Larra, Zorrilla, el Duque de Rivas, Espronceda, Tamayo y Baus, Echegaray, Bécquer, and Pérez Galdós will be discussed. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 761. Medieval Literature. (3) Reading and interpretation of the principal literary works of Medieval Spain, from the jarchas and the Poema de Mío Cid to the cronicas and La Celestina, studied within the historical and cultural context of each. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 763. Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. (3) The major writers and directions of twentieth-century literature in Spain. Analysis and discussion of the works of such representative authors as Unamuno, Jiménez, Guillén, Lorca, Cela, Buero Vallejo, and Delibes. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 764. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. (3) Reading and analysis of the works of such major writers as Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderón de la Barca, Garcilaso, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Góngora, and Quevedo, as well as selected works from the picaresque tradition. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 766. Spanish Poetry. (3) The development of the poetry of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Includes poets such as Berceo, the romanceros, Manrique, Góngora, Quevedo, Espronceda, Bécquer, Machado, Lorca, Guillén, Otero, Fuertes, Rodríguez, and Rossetti. Taught as a seminar. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 767. Spanish-American Poetry. (3) The development of poetry from its early pre-Columbian manifestations to the present time with emphasis on the twentieth century. Includes poets such as Sor Juana, Martí, Darío, Borges, Vallejo, Neruda, Paz, Storni, Agustini, and Castellanos. Taught as a seminar. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 770. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics. (3) Linguistic theory as it is applied to the Spanish language. Linguistic topics include syntax, phonology, morphology, semantics, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. Other topics include dialectology, bilingualism, and the creative use of language. Of interest to students of both language acquisition and literature. Taught in Spanish. Pr.: SPAN 564 and 567 or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 771. Introduction to Spanish Translation. (3) Translation theory and practice as applied to Spanish. Translations from Spanish to English and English to Spanish, involving unique problems related to science, business, reporting, and literature. Pr.: 6 hours of college Spanish at the 500 level or equiv. facility as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 772. The Hispanic World Today. (3) An investigation of selected social, political, and humanistic aspects of contemporary Hispanic culture. Pr.: Minimum of 6 hours of college Spanish at the 500 level or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 775. Cervantes. (3) Reading of the Quijote and other pertinent primary texts and discussion of the literary and cultural background of the period. Pr.: SPAN 563 and 567 or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 777. Spanish and Spanish-American Culture and Literature in Second-Language Learning. (3) Analysis and interpretation of cultural and literary texts from Spanish-speaking countries, with emphasis on the development of interpretive skills and materials, and their application to the Spanish curriculum at all levels. May be repeated once with a change in focus and texts. Pr.: Minimum of 6 hours of college Spanish at the 500 level or equiv. background as determined by modern languages faculty.

    SPAN 779. Seminar in Spanish. (3) A seminar with variable topics. Pr.: Senior standing or consent of the instructor.

    SPAN 799. Problems in Modern Languages. (Var.)

    Topics within Arts and Sciences:
    dMajors and Degrees dPre-Health Professions Program dKinesiology
    dDegree Requirements dAerospace Studies dMathematics
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences dAnthropology dMilitary Science
    dBachelor of Fine Arts dArt dModern Languages
    dBachelor of Music dBiochemistry dMusic
    dBachelor of Music Education dBiology dPhilosophy
    dAssociate of Arts for Military Personnel dChemistry dPhysics
    dAssociate of Science for Military Personnel dEconomics dPolitical Science
    dDean of Arts and Sciences Courses dEnglish dPsychology
    dProgram Options dGeography dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dAdvising dGeology dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies dHistory dStatistics
    dPre-Law dJournalism and Mass Communications dWomen's Studies
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    Kansas State University
    August 19, 2005