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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2004
    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
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    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    Technology and Aviation
    dStudent Services
    dUniversity General Education Program
    dArts, Sciences, and Business
    dAviation
    dEngineering Technology
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Engineering Technology

    David G. Delker, Department Head

    Professors Buchwald, Delker, Gold, Hassan, and Kinsler; Associate Professors Francisco, Shepard, Spaulding, and Wilson; Assistant Professors Dandu, Harding, Kahn, Leite, Mertz, Mortensen, Reitcheck, and Simmonds; Instructor Misoc.

    785-826-2672
    http://www.sal.ksu.edu/engtech/index.html

    Civil engineering technology (CET)
    Associate of technology 65 hours required for graduation

    Civil engineering technicians perform functions in the control and layout of horizontal locations and vertical elevations for proposed construction of buildings, bridges, and transportation facilities. Their work includes preliminary and final surveys, assisting in design and detailing stage, or supervision of construction to maintain quality control.

    The program prepares civil technicians for employment in industries dealing with the design and construction of highways, bridges, railroads, airports, water supply and distribution projects, and other projects ranging from small-scale construction jobs to those involving tremendous capital expenditures.

    The associate degree program in civil engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, Md., 21202. 410-347-7700.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    MATH 150Plane Trigonometry3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    MET 111Technical Graphics3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    CET 120Materials Sampling and Testing2
    17
     
    Spring semester
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    MATH 220Analytical Geometry and Calculus I4
    CET 130Plane Surveying4
    CET 211Statics3
    15
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    CET 241Construction Methods and Estimating2
    CET 410Managerial and Engineering Economics3
    CET 323Route Location Surveying3
    MET 245Material Strength and Testing3
    MET 252Fluid Mechanics I3
    CET 220Soils and Foundations2
    16
     
    Spring semester
    CET 340Mechanical and Electrical Systems3
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking 1A2
    CET 312Transportation Systems3
    CET 313Structural Design3
    University general education natural science elective3
    17
     
    Computer science technology (CMST)
    Associate of technology
    66 hours required for graduation

    The computer science technology curriculum places strong emphasis on the areas of programming, networking, computer hardware, and commercial software. The curriculum's technical elective block provides the opportunity to select courses in a wide range of computer technology topics. The curriculum emphasizes program design skills to develop fundamental problem-solving in multiple computer programming languages. Practical computer applications are developed using structured design and programming methodologies. Networking and related classes emphasize application and implementation of current technology. Class assignments are structured to prepare students for real-life projects. Courses require a significant amount of laboratory work.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    CMST 100Introduction to Operating Systems3
    CMST 103Introduction to Program Design3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    BUS 251Financial Accounting3
    15
     
    Spring semester
    CMST 140Visual Basic I3
    or
    CMST 220COBOL I3
    or
    CMST 245C++ Programming I3
    CMST 180Database Development3
    CMST 130Introduction to PC Hardware3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking 1A2
    BUS 252Managerial Accounting3
    Computer science technology elective3
    17
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    CMST 250Networking I3
    CMST 330Systems Analysis and Design3
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    University general education humanities/ social science/business elective3
    Advanced program language elective3
    Computer science technology elective3
    18
     
    Spring semester
    CMST 333Software System Development3
    University general education science elective4
    Humanities/business/social science elective3
    Computer science technology elective6
    16
     
    Computer science technology electives
    CMST 140Visual Basic I3
    CMST 220COBOL I3
    CMST 245C++ Programming I3
    CMST 255Visual Basic II *3
    CMST 300Assembly Language Program3
    CMST 315Networking II3
    CMST 320COBOL II*3
    CMST 341C++ Programming II*3
    CMST 345Networking III3
    CMST 350Unix Administration3
    Other electives as approved by the computer program coordinator
    *Approved advanced program language elective

    Geographic information systems (GIS) option
    66 hours required for graduation

    Action is under way to eliminate the associate degree in computer science technology geographic information systems option. Students interested in learning about geographic information systems are encouraged to contact the Department of Arts, Sciences, and Business for more information.

    This option allows the student to combine their computer learning with a specialization in GIS and application of global positioning systems (GPS) and related technologies.

    The GIS option is a computer-based mapping system which stores, integrates, and analyzes information about land aspects. GPS is a satellite-based navigation and positioning system. GIS and GPS technologies are tools that are currently being utilized in tax mapping; resource management; navigation, routing, and tracking of delivery vehicles and emergency vehicles; facilities management; precision agriculture; planning; management of transportation systems and utility networks; legislative reapportionment; and monitoring of environmental hazards and utility networks; legislative reapportionment; and monitoring of environmental hazards and our water supply and water quality.

    The need for graduates who are well versed in the GIS technologies is rapidly increasing. Employment opportunities are excellent with even greater demand in the foreseeable future.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    MATH 151Applied Plane Trigonometry2
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    MET 111Technical Graphics3
    CMST 103Introduction to Program Design3
    CMST 100Operating Systems3
    16
     
    Spring semester
    CMST 140Visual Basic I3
    CMST 130Introduction to PC Hardware3
    GIS 150Introduction to GIS3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    CET 130Plane Surveying4
    16
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    CET 250Photogrammetry3
    GIS 451Georeferencing3
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    CMST 330System Analysis and Design3
    BUS 315Supervisory Management3
    GIS 350Advanced Issues in GIS3
    18
     
    Spring semester
    GEOL 100Earth in Action3
    GEOL 105Elementary Geology Lab1
    STAT 320Elements of Statistics3
    GIS 355Projects in GIS3
    CMST 250Networking I3
    GEOG 242Physical Geography3
    16
     
    Construction engineering technology (CNET)
    Associate of technology 64 hours required for graduation

    The construction engineering technology program prepares graduates to seek employment in the construction industry, in fields ranging from building construction to heavy construction. Course topics include contracts and specifications, construction estimating, surveying, site construction, mechanical and electrical systems, plus essential concepts in mathematics, science, and interpersonal communications.

    Graduates are prepared to assist in the construction of designs prepared by engineers and architects. Graduates may also continue their education in the construction science and management bachelor's degree program offered by the College of Engineering on the Manhattan campus.

    Freshman
    Fall semester

    CET 120Materials Sampling and Testing2
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    MATH 150Plane Trigonometry3
    MET 111Technical Graphics3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    17
     
    Spring semester
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    CET 130Plane Surveying4
    CET 211Statics3
    CNS 210Introduction to ConstructionComputer Programming
    3
    14
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    CET 241Construction Method and Estimating2
    CET 410Managerial and EngineeringEconomics
    3
    CNS 320Construction Materials2
    CET 350Site Construction3
    MET 245Material Strength and Testing3
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    17
     
    Spring semester
    CET 340Mechanical and Electrical Systems3
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking 1A2
    SPAN 161Spanish I5
    CET 351Construction Techniques andDetailing
    3
    16
     
    Electronic and computer engineering technology (ECET)
    Associate of technology 64 hours required for graduation

    The electronic and computer engineering technology curriculum emphasizes the theory and application of electronic circuits, instrumentation, and systems. Numerous laboratory experiences reinforce the concepts taught in the classroom. Course work in this curriculum includes a strong foundation in basic circuit theory, semiconductor applications, digital systems, microprocessor programming and interfacing, plus essential concepts in mathematics, science, and interpersonal communications.

    Electronic and computer engineering technicians work in all areas of the electronics industry, including industrial control electronics, communications, and digital systems. These individuals work closely with electronic engineering technologists, electrical engineers, computer scientists, and other professionals in the design, development, marketing, and maintenance of electronic products and systems.

    The associate degree program in electronic engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, Md., 21202. 410-347-7700.

    Freshman
    Fall semester

    ECET 100Basic Electronics4
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    MATH 151Applied Plane Trigonometry2
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking 1A2
    ECET 020Electronic and Computer EngineeringTechnology Seminar
    14
     
    Spring semester
    ECET 101Direct Current Circuits3
    ECET 110Semiconductor Electronics4
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    CMST 101Applied BASIC Programming2
    ECET 020Electronic and Computer EngineeringTechnology Seminar
    17
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    ECET 201Alternating Current Circuits4
    ECET 210Linear Circuit Applications4
    ECET 240Electronic Manufacturing3
    ECET 250Digital Logic4
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    18
     
    Spring semester
    ECET 230Industrial Controls4
    ECET 252Microprocessor Fundamentals4
    CHM 110General Chemistry3
    CHM 111General Chemistry Laboratory1
    Humanities/social science elective3
    15
     
    Bachelor of science in electronic and computer engineering technology (ECETB)
    128 hours required for graduation (64 upper division + 64 associate degree)

    Students may continue their studies in electronic and computer engineering technology beyond the associate degree level to obtain the bachelor of science degree in electronic and computer engineering technology. The baccalaureate degree typically requires two years of study beyond the associate degree.

    Course work in the junior and senior years of the baccalaureate degree program provides additional depth of understanding of circuit analysis techniques, digital systems, data communications, and industrial electronics. Individual and group project assignments are emphasized. Additional mathematics, science, and elective courses provide a strong background with which graduates are prepared for the technical professions of tomorrow.

    Graduates work as electronic and computer engineering technologists in many industrial settings. Career activities include product design and development, industrial automation, technical sales, and project management.

    The bachelor's degree program in electronic engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, Md., 21202. 410-347-7700.

    Junior
    Fall semester

    ECET 352Digital Circuits and Systems4
    CMST 222Applications in C for EngineeringTechnology
    3
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    Science elective with laboratory4
    Humanities/social science elective3
    18
     
    Spring semester
    ECET 320Electronic Communication Systems4
    CMST 250Computer Networking I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    BUS 315Supervisory Management3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    16
     
    Senior
    Fall semester
    ECET 421Telecommunications Systems4
    ECET 430Network Analysis3
    ECET 480Electronic Design I1
    Technical elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    14
     
    Spring semester
    ECET 420Communication Circuits Design4
    ECET 450Digital Systems and ComputerArchitecture
    4
    ECET 481Electronic Design II2
    Technical elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    16
     
    Mechanical engineering technology (MET)
    Associate of technology 68 hours required for graduation

    The mechanical engineering technology curricula prepare graduates for positions in mechanical and/or manufacturing industries as engineering technicians or technologists. The programs embrace the design, manufacture, test sales, and maintenance of mechanical products, including the tools and machines by which they are made.

    Course work helps students develop the ability to use trade and technical literature to solve problems. Computers are heavily integrated into this program in such areas as problem solving, data collection, process simulation, optimization, and control.

    The technician's duties may involve drafting, use of handbooks and tables, calculations of strength and reliability, selection of materials, and cost estimating for the development of almost any type of machine or mechanism. Technicians may also conduct performance and endurance tests on various devices and report results.

    Graduates are employed by manufacturing industries, testing laboratories, marketing firms, consulting firms, government agencies, and in businesses they themselves establish.

    The associate degree program in mechanical engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, Md., 21202. 410-347-7700.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    MET 111Technical Graphics3
    MET 121Manufacturing Methods3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    MATH 151Applied Plane Trigonometry2
    CMST 101Applied BASIC Programming2
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    16
     
    Spring semester
    MET 117Mechanical Detailing3
    MET 125Computer-Numerical-Controlled Machine Processes2
    CET 211Statics3
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    18
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    MET 231Physical Materials and Metallurgy3
    MET 245Materials Strength and Testing3
    MET 252Fluid Mechanics I3
    ECET 100Basic Electronics4
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    17
     
    Spring semester
    MET 230Automated Manufacturing Systems I3
    MET 246Dynamics of Machines3
    MET 264Machine Design Technology I3
    MET 265Sophomore Design Project2
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    17
     
    Bachelor of science in mechanical engineering technology (METB)
    128 hours required for graduation (60 upper division + 68 associate degree)

    Students may continue their studies in mechanical engineering technology beyond the associate degree level to obtain the bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering technology. The baccalaureate degree typically requires two years of study beyond the associate degree.

    The upper-division curriculum provides greater and more rigorous depth in mechanical theory and applications. Additional study of science, mathematics, communications, social sciences, humanities, and related business and industrial operations provides breadth beyond the student's major concentration.

    The bachelor's degree program in mechanical engineering technology is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050; Baltimore, Md., 21202. 410-347-7700.

    Junior

    Fall semester
    MET 314Computer-Aided Solid Modeling2
    MET 346Elements of Mechanisms3
    MET 365Machine Design Technology II3
    CMST 222Applications in C Programming for Engineering Technology3
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    15
     
    Spring semester
    MET 333Advanced Material Science2
    MET 353Fluid Mechanics II3
    MET 383Advanced CAD/CAM2
    ELET 264Electric Power and Devices3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    Approved basic science elective4
    17
     
    Senior
    Fall semester
    MET 382Industrial Instrumentation and Controls3
    MET 462Senior Design Project I1
    MET 481Automated Manufacturing Systems II4
    Humanities/social science elective3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    14
     
    Spring semester
    MET 460Tool Design for Manufacturing3
    MET 464Senior Design Project II2
    MET 471Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    Humanities/social science elective3
    14
     
    Web development technology (CWDT)
    Associate of technology 66 hours required for graduation

    The web development technology program builds a foundation in computer science and applies these concepts to the world of e-commerce and website development. All students take introductory classes in operating systems and program design. The program also provides students with courses in programming and network administration.

    Students interested in programming-oriented careers will find the curriculum challenging and rewarding. Students obtain experience with client-side programming, server-side programming, video and audio streaming, as well as database integration and other ways to make the web an effective tool for business.

    Students also learn project management and the use of timetables and other organizational techniques. Software tools like Flash, DreamWeaver, and Javascript will also be utilized, but the program emphasis will focus on solutions from a programming-oriented environment.

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    CMST 100Operating Systems3
    CMST 103Introduction to Program Design3
    CMST 135Web Page Development I3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    15
     
    Spring semester
    CMST 140Visual Basic I3
    CMST 180Database Development3
    CMST 130Introduction to PC Hardware3
    CMST 155Web Page Development II3
    BUS 110Introduction to Business3
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    18
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    CMST 255Visual Basic II3
    CMST 250Networking I3
    CMST 235Web Development Programming I3
    CMST 330System Analysis and Design3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    Humanities/business/social science elective3
    17
     
    Spring semester
    CMST 332Web Development Project3
    ENGL 202Technical Writing3
    Business Elective3
    Science Elective4
    Humanities/social science elective3
    16
     
    Civil engineering technology courses
    CET 110 Civil Technology Drafting. (2) II. A course in drafting the types of drawings common to civil engineering technology, including ownership certificates, plans and profiles, contour maps, site grading drawings, and topographic layouts. Drawings are made using traditional drafting equipment and computers. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 111.

    CET 120. Materials Sampling and Testing. (2) I. A course in the proper use of aggregates and concrete materials (Portland cement and asphalt) in construction. Sampling and testing methods conform with American Society of Testing Materials standards. Six hours lab a week.

    CET 130. Plane Surveying. (4) II. A beginning course in the theory and practice of field measurements and notes for surveying. Emphasis is placed on accuracy and avoidance of common errors and mistakes. Two hours rec. and six hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 151.

    CET 140. Print Reading for Civil Construction. (1) I. A course dealing with methods used to retrieve information from construction plans in order to build all or part of the project. Two hours lab a week.

    CET 211. Statics. (3) I. A study of forces and their effects on the bodies upon which they act. Three hours rec. a week. Conc.: PHYS 113.

    CET 220. Soils and Foundations. (2) I. A course in the identification and classification of soils by the Unified method and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials method. Routine field tests are covered and used in the laboratory. One hour rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 100.

    CET 230. Land Surveying I. (3) II. A course dealing with the history of land surveying, procedures for researching records, construction right-of-way surveys, writing legal descriptions, and production of survey documents. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: CET 130.

    CET 234. Advanced Surveying Techniques. (3) II. A study of the advanced areas of surveying with primary emphasis on control networks, state plane coordinate systems, error theory, global positioning systems (GPS), tacheometry, geodetic surveying, GPS, and the use of electronic surveying equipment. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CET 130, 323.

    CET 235. Surveying Law. (3) II. A study of the legal aspects that apply to the surveying profession, and the role of the surveyor within the judicial framework of our court system. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CET 130.

    CET 240. Contracts and Specifications. (1) I. A study of the way a set of contracts and specifications are put together and how they act as a source of data on a construction job. The course also stresses the way information is gained from documents with speed and accuracy. One hour rec. a week. Pr.: CET 140 and 231.

    CET 241. Construction Methods and Estimating. (2) I. A study of the basic equipment needs, usage, costs, and quantity determinations for planning and estimating construction projects. Field trips through construction sites and visitations with inspectors assist in developing reporting procedures and inspection responsibilities. One hour rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 100.

    CET 250. Photogrammetry. (3) I. A class in which aerial photographs are used to create topographic drawings, relative and absolute orientation, aerotriangulation, orthophoto and rectification, and coordinate transformations. Hands-on experience will be gained by using stereoscopic plotters to convert photographic data into engineering maps. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CET 130.

    CET 300. Problems in CET. (Var.) I, II, S. A course in which advanced study is done in a specific area chosen by the student. Pr.: consent of instructor.

    CET 312. Transportation Systems. (3) II. A study of transportation systems with emphasis on traffic operations and control, planning, design, and drainage for highways, and urban roadways. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CET 130.

    CET 313. Structural Design. (3) II. A course combining design of components of structures in steel and reinforced concrete. Basic stress calculations and design concepts are studied for use in either a simplified design, detailing, or inspection role. Three hours rec. and four hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 245.

    CET 323. Route Location Surveying. (3) I. A course in the geometric methods of horizontal and vertical curve alignment. In addition, transitional spirals are examined and calculated. The laboratory portion provides a grounding of these concepts in the field by actual calculation and staking of control for roads, streets, and various types of routes. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CET 130.

    CET 340. Mechanical and Electrical Systems. (3) II. A study of the way mechanical and electrical systems are used in the construction of a building by a contractor. Systems include plumbing, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 151, PHYS 113, and CET 241.

    CET 350. Site Construction. (3) I. Study of site construction problems and procedures, sit survey and investigations, review of site plans, construction layouts, earthwork calculation, excavation/shoring methods, computer applications. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 111, CNS 210, CET 130, PHYS 113.

    CET 351. Construction Techniques and Detailing. (3) I. Study of construction methods and procedures in the assembly of building materials. Nine hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 111, CNS 210, and CET 350.

    CET 410. Managerial and Engineering Economics. (3) I. Economic analysis of problems as applied in the management of technology. Three hours rec. per week. Pr.: ECON 110.

    Computer information systems courses
    CMIS 100. Introduction to MS-DOS and Windows. (2) I, II, S. Provides fundamental concepts of the standard PC environment operating system: MS-DOS and Windows. Students will use the microcomputers in class to apply the operating system commands covered by the instructor. Lab assignments will be required in class. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec. a week in the lab.

    CMIS 101. Computer Fundamentals. (2) I, II. This course is designed as an introduction for students seeking to develop a broad, basic familiarity with the use of the microcomputer. Two hours rec. a week.

    CMIS 105. Introduction to PC Software. (2) I, II, S. Students will learn to use an integrated software package consisting of a word processor, spreadsheet with graphing capabilities, and a database manager. Fundamental operating system usage will be covered in Windows.

    CMIS 110. Word Processing. (2) I, II. A hands-on course introducing fundamental concepts and applications of word processing. Covers editing and formatting commands as well as sophisticated commands of the word processor. The word processing commands covered in class will be applied on the classroom microcomputers. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec. a week in the lab.

    CMIS 120. Spreadsheets. (2) I, II. Introduces fundamental concepts and applications of a spreadsheet for a business environment. The class will progress to more sophisticated applications of the spreadsheet during the course of the class. Students will apply the concepts covered to the microcomputers in the classroom. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec. a week in the lab.

    CMIS 130. Database Management. (2) I, II. Introduces fundamental concepts of a database management system application. Students will begin with the elementary database commands and will progress to more sophisticated database applications. Students will be required to apply the concepts covered in class to project assignments on the microcomputer. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec. a week in the lab.

    CMIS 145. Advanced Windows. (2) I, II. Students will learn to install and configure Microsoft Windows. Students will learn to install and use Windows' applications and utilities. The class will be taught in a computer laboratory environment. One hour rec. and one hour lab a week. Pr.: CMIS 100.

    CMIS 150. Advanced Spreadsheets. (2) I, II. This course will cover advanced topics in the use of spreadsheets. Major topics will include macro programming, @ functions, spreadsheet automation, linking spreadsheets, managing data, and importing/exporting data from the spreadsheet. Lecture will be in the computer lab to allow the student a hands-on experience. Students will be required to perform homework assignments outside of class time. One hour rec. and one hour lab a week. Pr.: CMIS 120.

    CMIS 200. Introduction to Desktop Publishing. (2) I, II. Students will learn to use PageMaker 4.0, a page composition/layout software package, in the hands-on environment of a PC lab. Students will perform production tasks and will learn the use of a scanner and basic design and production tips. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec a week in the lab. Pr.: CMIS 100 and 110.

    CMIS 210. Advanced Desktop Publishing. (2) I, II. Students are expected to have experience in the use of PageMaker. The course will cover proper design and layout of commonly produced publications. These layout techniques will be used by the student throughout the class to produce individual assignments. The class will primarily be taught in a computer laboratory. Each student will have access to a computer for their assignments. Each student will produce and present an individual project at the end of the class. Some homework and computer work will be required outside the class period. One hour rec. and one hour lab a week. Pr.: CMIS 200.

    CMIS 250. Introduction to UNIX. (2) I, II. This course is designed to provide the student with the basic commands and knowledge to use the UNIX operating system. The student will learn proper sign-on and-off procedures as well as how to manipulate files within the UNIX directory structure. The class is conducted in the hands-on environment of the computer lab. Eight-week course requiring four hours rec. a week in the lab. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    Computer science technology courses
    CMST 100. Introduction to Operating Systems. (3) I, II. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of standard operating systems components, and is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the fundamentals of specific operating systems rather than operating systems theory. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: None

    CMST 101. Applied Basic Programming. (2) I, II. Study of computer programming techniques and applications for nonmajors. The Visual Basic programming language is used to develop programs. Topics include formula translation, decision and repetitive structures, sequential files, sorting, and searching. Emphasis on problem solving and program structure. Two hours lec. a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 100.

    CMST 103. Introduction to Program Design. (3) I, II. This course is designed as a language-independent introduction to the logic of data processing. Topics include an overview of systems development and a detailed examination of problem definition, problem analysis, general design, and detailed design. The student is also introduced to the various tools, techniques, and devices utilized in program design including logical control structures, program narratives, file specification forms, printer spacing charts, hierarchy charts, data dictionaries, ANSI flowcharting, pseudocode, and Warnier-Orr diagrams. Three hours lec. a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 100.

    CMST 130. Introduction to PC Hardware. (3) I, II, S. This course will cover material relating to personal computer hardware. Concepts of memory management and proper hardware configuration and computer upgrades will be covered. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: Previous computer usage.

    CMST 140. Visual Basic I. (3) I, II. This course introduces Visual Basic as an object-oriented, event-driven programming environment. Creating forms, adding controls, designing menu bars, and writing Basic code for events, procedures, and functions will be emphasized. Students will complete several programming assignments and projects that will use multiple forms, file manipulation, use of graphics, and multiple document interface. Students will schedule lab time outside of class for completion of program assignments. Pr.: CMST 101 or 103.

    CMST 180. Database Development. (3) I, II. This course deals with the importance of the data dictionary, the database design process, data model comparisons, SQL, and the performance of a database. Laboratory work will include the design and implementation of individual databases. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: Previous use of PC software.

    CMST 220. COBOL I. (3) I, II. Study of the COBOL programming language will introduce students to algorithmic solutions using business applications. This initial programming class will stress not only the COBOL language but also concepts of modular designed structured programming and techniques. Three hours lec. a week. Pr. or conc.: CMST 100 and 103.

    CMST 222. Applications in C Programming for Engineering Technology. (3) I. This course will introduce the student to structured program design and implementation. Students will learn to apply the C language in calculations, input, output, file handling. Students will use the C language as the control language with various interfaces. Students will write approximately 10 programs. Each student will select, design, and implement an individual project at the end of the semester. Three hours lec. Pr.: CMST 101 or other college-level programming language.

    CMST 225. Commercial Software Analysis. (3) I, II. Students will be given an in-depth introduction to currently popular software application packages. Such items as word processors, spreadsheets, desktop publishing software, and integrated packages will be examined in terms of direct business/industrial applications. Concepts of each software package (including advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and hardware requirements ) will be analyzed. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: None

    CMST 230. RPG. (3) II. This course is designed to introduce the Report Program Generator language. RPG II is used primarily for the generation of business reports including payroll, inventory, general ledger, and other business applications. The lab work consists of writing several RPG II programs to solve business report problems. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CMST 100 and 103.

    CMST 245. C++ Programming I. (3) I, II. The syntax of the C++ language will be covered. Structured programming, modular design, and object oriented programming will be stressed. Creating functions, classes, and abstract data types will be covered. The uses of C++ in writing application programs will be reflected in the program assignments. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CMST 103 or previous college-level programming language.

    CMST 250. Networking I. (3) I, II. This course is a study of computer networking concepts and terms. Topics include local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, and transmission media. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: Previous computer experience.

    CMST 255. Visual Basic II. (3) I. This course uses Visual Basic as an object-oriented, event-driven programming environment. Students will complete several programming projects involving the use and manipulation of databases, spreadsheet data. Students will create complete stand-alone executable applications including help procedures and installation methods. Students will also use Visual Basic to create applications using multimedia and graphics. Student programming assignments will concentrate on fewer but larger programming projects. Students will design, implement, and present an individual project at the end of this class. Students will schedule lab time outside of class time for completion of programming assignments. Pr.: CMST 140.

    CMST 300. Assembly Language Programming. (3) I, II. This course covers programming of a microcomputer at the assembly language level. Students will learn to develop links and integrate assembly language routines to higher-level languages. Specific topics covered include an overview of operating systems and assembly language. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CMST 100, 103, and 220 or 245.

    CMST 315. Networking II. (3) I, II. This course will cover material that leads to an understanding and installation of local area networking of personal computers using popular networking operating systems. This will include necessary hardware, software, user software, and the different topologies. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CMST 250 and previous college-level programming class.

    CMST 320. COBOL II. (3) I, II. This course consists of an in-depth study of the COBOL language. More advanced topics will be covered, including table processing, the SORT, SEARCH, and MERGE features, the Balanced Line algorithm, and indexed file processing as well as interactive processing and screen building and handling. Lab work includes writing advanced business application programs using the COBOL language. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CMST 220.

    CMST 330. Systems Analysis and Design. (3) I. This course will study the steps in conducting a systems analysis, design and development. Lab work includes a class project to analyze the computer needs of a local business and recommend possible system solutions to be implemented. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CMST 103.

    CMST 333. Software System Development. (3) II. Implementation, testing, and integration of a software system. Project management and group programming dynamics are important aspects of this class. Pr.: CMST 330 (must be taken in preceding semester)

    CMST 341. C++ Programming II. (3) II. This class is designed to allow the student to apply the object oriented programming methodology to design and implementation of Windows applications. Students will implement abstract data types, use the foundations classes, control computer hardware, and interact with other Windows applications. Each student will submit an individual C++ project at the end of the semester. Three hours lec. Pr.: CMST 245.

    CMST 345. Networking III. (3) II. This course will provide the student with the information and skills needed to design, install, configure, secure, and administer the interface between a LAN and the Internet. The emphasis will be on designing and implementing secure systems communicating within a TCP/IP environment. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CMST 245.

    CMST 350. UNIX Administration. (3) II. The course will cover the essentials for becoming a UNIX administrator. Subjects included will be bring up a UNIX system, an in-depth look at the file system, user configuration, handling security, modems, networking, and shell programming. Two hours lec. and one hour lab a week. Pr.: CMST 100 or CMIS 250.

    Electronic and computer engineering technology courses
    ECET 020. Electronic and Computer Engineering Technology Seminar. (0) I, II. A monthly assembly of all first-year electronic and computer engineering technology students for the purpose of exchanging information regarding academic, technical, social, ethical, and professional matters among students, faculty, and practicing professionals. One hour lec. a month.

    ECET 101. Direct Current Circuits. (3) I, II. An introductory course in basic circuit theory emphasizing the analysis of passive circuit networks containing resistance, capacitance, and inductance operating in direct current conditions. Topics include equivalent circuits, network theorems, capacitance, RC-circuit response, inductance, RL-circuit response, and computer simulation. Two hours lecture and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 100.

    ECET 100. Basic Electronics. (4) I. A survey course designed to provide an overview of basic direct and alternating current circuits and an introduction to linear and digital electronics. Laboratory exercises reinforce circuit theory and provide skills in the use of common electronic instruments. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 100 or consent of instructor.

    ECET 110. Semiconductor Electronics. (4) II. An introductory course in electronic devices. Topics include PN-junction theory, diodes, transistors, transistor biasing, transistor modeling, operational amplifiers, voltage regulators, and field-effect transistors (FET). Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 100 and 151. Pr. or conc.: ECET 101.

    ECET 201. Alternating Current Circuits. (4) II. Analysis of passive networks containing resistance, capacitance, and inductance operating in alternating current conditions. Includes sinusoidal waveforms, polar and rectangular complex algebra, inductive and capacitive reactance, impedance networks, power factor correction, resonance, magnetic circuits, and an introduction to three-phase power distribution. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 101 and MATH 151.

    ECET 210. Linear Circuit Applications. (4) I. Analysis and design of analog circuits including differential amplifiers, oscillators, linear and switching power amplifiers, applications of operational amplifiers, advanced semiconductor devices, and heat sinks. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 110. Pr. or conc.: ECET 201.

    ECET 230. Industrial Controls. (4) II. A study of electronic circuits and systems encountered in industrial environments. Topics include power control devices and applications, power system design, sensors, transducers, PLCs, computer-based data acquisition, and automatic control concepts. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 210. Pr. or conc.: ECET 252.

    ECET 240. Electronic Manufacturing. (3) I. A practical course in the details of electronic system design and fabrication. Topics include 2D CAD; printed-circuit board design, layout, and fabrication; electronic-system design principles; fabrication, packaging and assembly techniques for electronic systems; and through-hole and surface-mount technologies. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 110.

    ECET 250. Digital Logic. (4) I. Study of basic logic elements including gates, flip-flops, counters, and registers. Includes Boolean algebra, logic reduction methods, and digital logic applications. Emphasis on computer simulation and PLD implementation of logic circuits. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: ECET 100.

    ECET 252. Microprocessor Fundamentals. (4) II. Concepts of microprocessor architecture, programming, and interfacing. Topics include assembly language programming, data conversion methods, and microprocessor-based system development tools. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 250 and CMST 101.

    ECET 264. Electric Power and Devices. (3) II. Industrial applications of direct and alternating power, devices, and systems. Topics include electrical and electronic power devices, controllers, servomechanisms, and actuators; DC and AC motors and generators, motor speed control and drive systems; electrical power distribution, and industrial electronics applications. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 100 and MATH 151.

    ECET 320. Electronic Communication Systems. (4) II. A survey of analog and digital communication techniques and systems including modulation, transmission line concepts, radio-wave propagation, antenna theory, and the effects of noise. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 210 and MATH 220.

    ECET 352. Digital Circuits and Systems. (4) I. Applications of programmable logic, including microprocessors, and microcontrollers. Students use software design tools such as simulators and cross compilers to design systems and analyze system performance. Data conversion methods and peripheral interfacing techniques are emphasized. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: ECET 252; CMST 222.

    ECET 420. Communication Circuits Design. (4) I. An introduction to the theory and design of electronic circuits for communications emphasizing the implementation and analysis of common radio-frequency (RF) building blocks. Topics include s-parameters, the Smith chart, component behavior, RF test equipment, computer simulation, filter design, impedance matching, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers, and demodulators. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 320.

    ECET 421. Telecommunication Systems. (4) I. An introduction to data communications and a survey of modern communication systems. Topics include Fourier analysis, data encoding, data link control, fiber-optic systems, cellular systems, satellite systems, and the modern telephone system. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 320, CMST 250, and MATH 221

    ECET 430. Network Analysis. (3) I. A study of various network topics including Laplace transforms, signal flow graph models, transfer functions, network response, and differential equations and linear approximations of physical systems. The theory of control systems and their applications are discussed. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: ECET 230 and MATH 221.

    ECET 450. Digital Systems and Computer Architecture. (4) II. Development of advanced digital design techniques. Topics include VHDL-based design, simulation, and synthesis; testing and validation; system-level interfacing; and computer architecture. Three hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 352.

    ECET 480. Electronic Design I. (1) I. Application of electronic principles and the design methodology to solving a significant design problem in a team context. Includes determining customer requirements, exploring and choosing design alternatives, scheduling, and project management. Significant milestones are the project's conceptual, preliminary, and critical design reviews, which require written and oral presentations. One hour lec. a week. Pr.: ECET 320, 352. Pr. or conc.: ECET 430.

    ECET 481. Electronic Design II. (2) II. A continuation of ECET 480. Includes the implementation, testing, and delivery of the project initiated in ECET 480 Electronic Design I. Significant milestones are the project prototype, design report, and final presentation. Four hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 480.

    ECET 492. Problems in Electronic and Computer Engineering Technology. (Var.) I,II,S. Opportunity for advanced independent study in specific topic areas in electronic engineering technology. Topics are selected jointly by the student and the instructor. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    ECET 499. Special Topics in Electronic and Computer Engineering Technology. (Var.) I,II,S. Offered on sufficient demand. Advanced topics in electronic engineering technology. Pr.: Varies with the announced topic.

    Mechanical engineering technology courses
    MET 111. Technical Graphics. (3) I, II. Free-hand sketching, lettering, scales and measurements. Introduction to CAD system for learning and applying technical graphics concepts and techniques to produce finished drawings. National and international standards. Theory and applications of orthographic projection and pictorial drawings. Standards for symbols, section views, and dimensioning included. Descriptive geometry, including, orthographic solutions involving the point, line and plane projections, intersections as well as surface development of solids, bearings, slope, true length, and true size determination. Six hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 100 or consent of instructor.

    MET 117. Mechanical Detailing. (3) II. Preparation of shop drawings for manufacturing, fabrication, or assembly. Specifications of size, shape, material for manufacture. Cost and tolerance relationship. Introduction to geometric tolerancing. Selective assembly and stress calculations in interference fits. Computer techniques including CAD, spreadsheets, and mathematical analysis are applied throughout the course. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 111, MATH 100 and 151.

    MET 121. Manufacturing Methods. (3) I. Study and practice of welding, weld testing, and cost estimation. Introduction to welding metallurgy and special welding processes. Recitation and laboratory practice in basic machine shop operations on lathes, milling machines, and drill presses. Use of hand tools, measuring tools, metal cutting machines, and grinders are also studied. One hour rec. and six hours lab a week.

    MET 125. Computer-Numerical-Controlled Machine Processes. (2) II. Study and practice of basic CNC programming and machining operations. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 121. Pr.: MATH 100 and 151 or consent of instructor.

    MET 210. Computer-Aided Drafting. (2) I, II. Applications and understanding of microcomputers in technical drafting and design are studied. Topics include generative graphics, hardware and software terminology, point plotting and line drafting, graphics, programming, geometric figures, dimensioning and annotating, and finished drawings. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: Knowledge of drafting.

    MET 230. Automated Manufacturing Systems I. (3) II. A general survey of the various components and operations in an automated manufacturing system including material handling, robotics, tooling, inspection and quality control, CAD, CNC, and other production processes. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 125 and ECET 100.

    MET 231. Physical Materials and Metallurgy. (3) I. A broad view of materials used in industry, including structures of materials, how they react to stress and temperature, how the polyphase structures form, and how they are controlled to produce optimum properties. Students will examine through study and laboratory experimentation ferrous and nonferrous metals, polymers, composites, and ceramics. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: MATH 100 and CHM 210.

    MET 245. Material Strength and Testing. (3) I. Calculations of material strength and deformation are complemented with principles and practice of mechanical testing including instrumentation and measurement in the areas of loads, stresses, deformations, thermal stresses, and other quantities. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: CET 211.

    MET 246. Dynamics of Machines. (3) I. Velocities, accelerations, and forces in existing mechanisms to produce motions. Work, energy, impulse and momentum concepts in kinetics. Vibrations in machine parts. Three hour lec. a week. Pr.: MATH 220; PHYS 113.

    MET 252. Fluid Mechanics I. (3) I. Fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics. Study of buoyancy, energy equation, viscosity, and flow measurement. Selected applications of fluid mechanics in civil and mechanical technologies. Computer-aided solution of problems in fluid mechanics. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 220, PHYS 113, CMST 101.

    MET 264. Machine Design Technology I. (3) II. Continued study of design process including investigation of theories of failure, stress analysis, stress concentration, deflections, materials, and costs relating to machine design. Three hours rec. a week. Pr. or conc.: MET 245.

    MET 265. Sophomore Design Project. (2) II. Design and construction of mechanical and/or electromechanical devices to satisfy the requirements of an industrial project. Four hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 245. Pr. or conc.: MET 264.

    MET 314. Computer-Aided Solid Modeling. (2) I. Study and applications of computer aided modeling of real-world three-dimensional objects. This course moves beyond simple CAD drawings which consist of collections of lines, arcs, and curves. Activities include developing 3-D object models containing surfaces and edges and analysis of the modeled objects. Four hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 117, MET 125.

    MET 333. Advanced Material Science. (2) II. A continuation of the study of metal and non- metal materials. Emphasis on properties, manufacturing techniques, and applications of materials including plastics, ceramics, composites, electrical and optical materials. Laboratory experiments illustrating the modern concepts in testing of materials with emphasis on design and processing considerations for quality products. One hour rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 231 and CHM 210.

    MET 346 Elements of Mechanisms. (3) II. Fundamental motion concepts of displacement, velocity, and acceleration are studied, as well as analytical and graphical analysis and synthesis of linkages, gear trains, cams, pulleys, and combinations of these elements. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: MET 111, MET 246, and PHYS 113.

    MET 353. Fluid Mechanics II. (3) II. Fluid properties, compressible flow, analysis of power conveyance in hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Investigation of relationships between thermal and fluid power. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 252.

    MET 365. Machine Design Technology II. (3) I. Covers design of machine elements for structural integrity, reliability, and economy. Lecture and laboratory work in applications of advanced strength of materials and machine design as it relates to extensive design projects. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 263.

    MET 382. Industrial Instrumentation and Controls. (3) I. An introduction to process control systems for industrial applications. Course topics include concepts and terminology, first- and second-order systems, measurement of motion, gauges and transducers, signal processing, and measurement of properties. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: ECET 264 and PHYS 113.

    MET 383. Advanced CAD/CAM. (2) II. This course will provide experience in linking CAD to computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) permitting the design of parts using CAD, developing the CNC program using CAM, and then manufacturing the product using CNC machines under computer control. One hour rec. and two hour lab a week. Pr.: MET 125 and 314.

    MET 460. Tool Design for Manufacturing. (3) II. Principles and practices involved in tool drawing and design concepts necessary for the manufacture of products. Emphasis on design of jigs and fixtures, gauging devices, dies, ease of operation, and methods of assembly. Production cost related to selection of parts and methods of production is stressed. Applied laboratory exercises illustrated through specific case studies. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 117, MET 125, and MET 346.

    MET 462. Senior Design Project I. (1) I. Selection, definition, and analysis of a project supervised by faculty. Includes consideration of project parameters, trade-off studies, alternative solutions, and justification of selected solution. Completion and presentation of a written project proposal included. Two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 364 and senior standing.

    MET 464. Senior Design Project II. (2) II. Development and implementation of project proposal submitted in MET 462. Construction, packaging, and testing of project culminating in a senior design project report which may include full documentation and performance specifications, functional description, theoretical analysis, schematics, cost analysis, parts list, drawings, etc. Project results will be presented orally to a select committee at the end of the course. Four hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 462 and senior standing.

    MET 471. Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer. (3) II. This course emphasizes thermodynamic laws and equations and the use of tables and charts for properties of important fluids. Applications to systems used for producing, transforming, and applying heat and mechanical energy are also studied. Conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer processes are studied and investigated in the laboratory. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 252 and MATH 214.

    MET 481. Automated Manufacturing Systems II. (4) I. Covers systems for manufacturing operations including facilities, supplies, materials, procedures, and control. Topics include design, programming, feedback for manufacturing, production set-up, automated work cells, and decision issues. Two hours rec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MET 230. Pr. or conc.: MET 382.

    MET 490. Industrial Work Internship. (var.) I, II, S. The student will work as an intern with business and industry in mechanical engineering technology field. A report detailing duties performed and tasks accomplished is required at the end of the internship period. Pr.: Sophomore standing and consent of section chairperson.

    MET 492. Problems in Mechanical Engineering Technology. (Var.) I, II. Opportunity for advanced independent study in specific topic areas in mechanical engineering technology. Topics selected jointly by the student and the instructor. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    MET 499. Selected Topics in MET. (Var. 1-6) I, II, S. Group or individual study of a selected topic in mechanical engineering technology, title to be determined in advance of each time the course is offered. Total credits limited to 6 credit hours, with a maximum of 3 credit hours per semester. Instruction is by lecture, laboratory, or a combination of both. Pr.: Permission of section chairperson.

    College of Engineering courses taught on the Salina campus
    CNS 210. Intro to Construction Computer Programming. (3) II. Computer and disk operating systems, programming techniques, and spreadsheets for construction applications. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: MATH 150

    CNS 320. Construction Materials. (2) I. Study and analysis of construction materials, their properties, selection, and use. Two hours lec. a week. Pr.: MET 111

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    Kansas State University
    June 5, 2003