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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2004
    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
    Services for Students
    Auxiliary Services and Facilities
    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    dDegree Programs
    dGeneral Requirements
    dProgram Options
    dApparel, Textiles, and Interior Design
    dFamily Studies and Human Services
    dGeneral Human Ecology
    dHotel, Restaurant, Institution Management and Dietetics
    dHuman Nutrition
    Technology and Aviation
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Human Nutrition

    Denis M. Medeiros, Head

    Professors E. Chambers, Grunewald, Holcomb, Koo, and Medeiros; Associate Professors Baybutt, Lohse Knous, and Peters; Assistant Professors D. Chambers, Haub, Higgins, and Remig; Instructors Ferguson, Graham, Jordan, and Morcos; Emeriti: Professors Bowers, Caul, Clarke, Fryer, Newell, Reeves, Setser, and Tinklin; Associate Professors Atkinson, Harbers, and Smith.

    785-532-5508 Fax: 785-532-3132
    www.ksu.edu/humec/hn/

    The programs in the Department of Human Nutrition focus on the nutritional and sensory properties of food; on the metabolism of nutrients; on nutrient requirements throughout the life span; on issues related to diet and health; and consumer behavior and nutrition education. In addition the department offers an accredited athletic training program.

    The Department of Human Nutrition offers two programs leading to a bachelor of science degree in human nutrition: nutritional sciences, and public health nutrition.

    A dual-degree program in nutrition and exercise sciences is offered jointly with the Department of Kinesiology. Students earn a B.S. in human nutrition and a B.S. in kinesiology. This is one of the largest programs of its kind in the nation. The public health nutrition program is one of the few in the nation.

    Students who want to become registered dietitians must take additional courses to meet the academic requirements of the American Dietetic Association (didactic program in dietetics or DPD). They will then become eligible to apply for an accredited internship. Interested students should contact the DPD program director during the semester they are enrolled in HN 400.

    Specialized laboratories for sensory analysis and nutrition research are available for research and instruction. The department has an animal laboratory that is fully accredited by the American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC). In cooperation with the College of Veterinary Medicine, animals housed and maintained in the laboratory receive veterinary care to comply with the current NIH guidelines. A Nutritional Assessment laboratory includes facilities for physical and dietary assessments.

    Nutritional sciences (pre-medicine)
    Bachelor of science in human nutrition

    The nutritional sciences program emphasizes the biological and physical sciences and provides students with the background necessary to understand the function and metabolism of nutrients. The program provides an excellent foundation for students considering careers in medicine, dentistry, and other health science professions. The curriculum is designed to meet academic requirements for entering medical school, dental school, or allied health professions.

    General requirements (61-62 hours)
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    ENGL 300Expository Writing III3
    or
    ENGL 516Written Communication for
    the Sciences3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
    Humanities electives6
    BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
    BIOL 340Structure and Function of the Human Body8
    BIOL 450Modern Genetics4
    BIOL 455General Microbiology4
    MATH 150Trigonometry*3
    or
    Specified substitute*3
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    PHYS 114General Physics II4
     
    Professional studies (30 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 400Human Nutrition3
    HN 413Science of Food4
    HN 450Nutritional Assessment2
    HN 600Public Health Nutrition3
    HN 610Life Span Nutrition3
    HN 620Nutrient Metabolism4
    HN 630Clinical Nutrition5
    GHNE 310Human Needs3
    or
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
     
    Supporting courses (21 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    CHM 531Organic Chemistry I3
    CHM 532Organic Chemistry Lab2
    CHM 550Organic Chemistry II3
    BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
    BIOCH 522General Biochemistry Lab2
     
    Unrestricted electives7-8
     
    Total hours for graduation120
     
    *If trigonometry was taken in high school, substitute computer science, statistics, or higher mathematics course (3-4 hours).
     
    Nutrition and exercise sciences
    Bachelor of science in human nutrition
    Bachelor of science in kinesiology

    Nutrition and exercise sciences is a dual- degree program. Students complete a total of 148-154 credit hours and earn two degrees, one from the Department of Human Nutrition and the second from the Department of Kinesiology. Graduates of this program may pursue careers in health programs offered by hospitals, industries, wellness centers, public and private clinics, fitness camps, and athletic clubs.

    General requirements (80-86 hours)
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    ENGL 300Expository Writing III3
    or
    ENGL 516Written Communication for the Sciences3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
    AMETH 160Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3
    or
    ANTH 200Introductory to Cultural Anthropology**3
    or
    ANTH 204A General Education Introduction to Cultural Anthropology**3
     
    Additional courses as specified in the General Requirements section for Arts and Sciences:
    Humanities*11-12
    (One course each in fine arts, philosophy, Western heritage, and literary or rhetorical arts.)
    International studies overlay (1 course)**0-3
     
    BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
    BIOL 340Structure and Function of the Human Body8
    BIOL 455General Microbiology4
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    CHM 350General Organic Chemistry3
    BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
    PHYS 113General Physics4
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    MATH 150Plane Trigonometry3
    STAT 320Elements of Statistics3
    or
    STAT 330Elementary Statistics for the Social
    Sciences3
    CIS 101Introduction to Information Technology1
     
    Select two hours of the following:
    CIS 102Introduction to Microcomputer Spreadsheet Applications1
    CIS 103Introduction to Microcomputer Database Applications1
    CIS 104Introduction to Microcomputer Word Processing Applications1
     
    Professional studies (68 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    Nutrition science (33 hours)
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 352Personal Wellness3
    HN 400Human Nutrition3
    HN 413Science of Food4
    HN 450Nutritional Assessment2
    HN 600Public Health Nutrition3
    HN 610Life Span Nutrition3
    HN 620Nutrient Metabolism4
    HN 630Clinical Nutrition5
    GHNE 310Human Needs3
    or
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
     
    Nutrition science or exercise science (3 hours)
    HN 635Nutrition and Exercise3
    or
    KIN 635Nutrition and Exercise3
     
    Exercise science (32) hours)
    KIN 220Biobehavioral Basis of Exercise3
    KIN 250Measurement and Research Techniques3
    KIN 330Biomechanics3
    KIN 335Physiology of Exercise4
    KIN 336Physiology of Exercise Laboratory1
    KIN 340Physical Activity in Contemporary
    Society3
    KIN 345Psychological Dynamics of Physical
    Activity3
    KIN 625Exercise Testing and Prescription3
    KIN 655Fitness Promotion3
    KIN 601Cardiorespiratory Exercise Physiology3
    or
    KIN 603Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology3
    or
    KIN 605Topics in the Biological Basis of Kinesiology3
     
    KIN 600Exercise Psychology3
    or
    KIN 602Gender Issues in Sport and Exercise3
    or
    KIN 606Topics in the Behavioral Basis of Exercise3
     
    Total hours for graduation148-154
     
    *See the College of Arts and Sciences basic requirements in this catalog.
    **Students may satisfy the social science requirement at the same time they satisfy the requirement for the international studies overlay or humanities (western heritage).
     
    Public health nutrition
    Bachelor of science in human nutrition

    The public health nutrition curriculum includes emphasis on health promotion, as well as human nutrition. Students also gain firsthand experience with public health issues through completion of a practicum.

    Public health nutritionists develop community programs to promote nutrition and good health; educate people about the relationship between diet and health; conduct research on the psychological, cultural, social, economic, and environmental issues related to nutrition and health; or work with special groups who are at risk for nutrition-related health problems, such as pregnant women, infants, and the elderly. Opportunities are available with local health departments community wellness programs and agencies involved in international development.

    General requirements (65-67 hours)
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I3
    ENGL 200Expository Writing II3
    ENGL 300Expository Writing III3
    or
    ENGL 516Written Communication for the Sciences3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    or
    SPCH 106Public Speaking I3
    PSYCH 110General Psychology3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    SOCIO 211Introduction to Sociology3
    AMETH 160Introduction to American Ethnic Studies3
    or
    ANTH 204Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
    Humanities elective6
    BIOL 198Principles of Biology4
    BIOL 340Structure and Function of the Human Body8
    BIOL 455General Microbiology4
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    CHM 350General Organic Chemistry3
    BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
    MATH 100College Algebra3
    or
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    STAT 330Elementary Statistics for Social
    Science3
     
    Professional studies (36 hours)
    (Grades of C or higher required.)
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 352Personal Wellness3
    HN 400Human Nutrition3
    HN 413Science of Food4
    HN 450Nutritional Assessment2
    HN 600Public Health Nutrition3
    HN 610Life Span Nutrition3
    HN 620Nutrient Metabolism4
    HN 630Clinical Nutrition5
    HN 650Practicum in Human Nutrition3
    GHNE 310Human Needs3
    or
    FSHS 350Family Relationships and Gender Roles3
     
    Unrestricted electives17-19
     
    Total hours for graduation120
     
    Athletic training program
    Mission
    The athletic training curriculum program is a cooperative educational program housed in the Department of Human Nutrition with support from the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics. The program prepares students as entry-level athletic trainers through an extensive curriculum of didactic and clinical experiences in accordance with the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) standards and guidelines for an accredited program for athletic trainers. Upon successful completion of the program and graduation from the university, students will have the knowledge base necessary to sit for, and pass, the NATA certification examination and begin a career in one of the many professional endeavors as a certified athletic trainer.

    Level of students within the program
    Observational
    Before students are formally admitted to the athletic training program, they must undergo a period of guided observation in the athletic training rooms at K-State. This period allows students to make an informed decision about whether they wish to pursue athletic training as a career and it allows the staff athletic trainers to observe each student's work habits, knowledge, and abilities.

    Observation may last for one year and no academic credit is given for this time. Hours may not be accumulated toward the 800 hour minimum, nor does the student begin to work toward the two year minimum period. During the first two weeks of the semester, the program director will hold a meeting to discuss the observational requirements, general policies, and procedures. The student will then be assigned to a rotation between the various sports and athletic training rooms at K-State. The student will be asked to work five to 10 hours per week with the various athletic trainers at K-State. During these rotations the student is expected to finish a self-paced course of learning that reflects the abilities expected of an introductory student in athletic training.

    Admission policy
    During the spring semester, students interested in seeking formal admission into the athletic training curriculum must apply to the program director. Applications will be considered based on the following criteria:

    1. Completion of HN 320 with a grade of B or better.

    2. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better and at least a 3.0 grade point average in core classes.

    3. Demonstration of competence on the entrance oral and written examinations.

    4. Completion of an application provided by the program director.

    5. Completion of a physical performed by one of our physicians.

    The NATA mandates a maximum number of students that may be admitted to the curriculum. Therefore, this application process is competitive. Candidates will be evaluated by the entire athletic training staff and will be selected based on the criteria outlined above.

    Transfer students
    Transfer credit will only be received for HN 320 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. All other athletic training classes must be taken at K-State. Transfer students are required to complete a minimum of 800 clinical hours and four semesters of HN 585 Internship in Athletic Training at K-State.

    Transfer students who demonstrate exemplary prior experience will be accepted provisionally to the athletic training curriculum. If, after the first semester, they demonstrate the qualities expected of the student athletic trainers, transfer students will be accepted to full status.

    Exemplary prior experience would be demonstrated by the following criteria:

    1. Documentation of at least 500 clock hours of prior practical experience under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer.

    2. An overall grade point average of at least 2.75 at the previous institution attended.

    3. Completion of an equivalent of HN 320 with a grade of a B or better.

    An application to the curriculum as well as documentation of the requirements must be provided to the curriculum director prior to admittance.

    Athletic training educational program
    Athletic training is the art and science of treating athletic injuries. The education of athletic trainers is multifaceted and is intended to help students become proficient in the prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries; first aid and emergency care; administration of athletic training programs; and counseling and education of athletes. Athletic training is compatible with several degree programs. Education of athletic trainers is based on four components: overview courses, which form the basis of a strong but diverse education based in social sciences; background courses in basic and applied sciences, which form the basis of athletic training; the core courses, which provide the knowledge needed to become a successful athletic trainer; and practical work experiences with staff athletic trainers serving K-State athletic teams.

    Athletic training students must complete 53 hours in the athletic training program along with general university and individual departmental requirements.

    Curriculum program
    BIOL 340Structure and Function of the Human Body8
    HN 132Basic Nutrition3
    HN 352Personal Wellness3
    KIN 250Measurement and Research Techniques in Kinesiology3
    KIN 330Biomechanics3
    KIN 335Physiology of Exercise4
    KIN 336Physiology of Exercise Lab1
    KIN 340Physical Activity in Contemporary Society3
    KIN 345Psychological Dynamics of Physical Activity3
    HN 320Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries3
    HN 551Evaluation of Athletic Injuries of the Extremities3
    HN 552Emergency Procedures and Evaluation of Core Athletic Injuries3
    HN 555Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training3
    HN 556Rehabilitation and Conditioning for Athletic Injuries3
    HN 557Seminar in Issues in Administration in Athletic Training Programs3
    HN 585Internship in Athletic Training1
    HN 585Internship in Athletic Training1
    HN 585Internship in Athletic Training1
    HN 585Internship in Athletic Training1
    Total credits53
     
    Human nutrition courses
    University General Education courseHN 132. Basic Nutrition. (3) I, II, S. Concepts of human nutrition applied to personal food choices and health.

    HN 301. Food Trends, Legislation, and Regulation. (3) II. Food laws, regulation, labeling, additives, and residues. Current trends in market forms, packaging, and utilization of various foods.

    HN 320. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. (3) I, II. Principles and practices of treatment, taping, and care of minor athletic injuries. Pr.: EDSEC 250 or BIOL 340 or conc. enrollment.

    HN 352. Personal Wellness. (3) I. Impact of the effect of personal actions on lifelong wellness. Practical methods of assessing, maintaining, and improving behaviors to reduce the risk of illness and disability. Emphasis on developing skills to make informed, responsible health decisions. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

    HN 400. Human Nutrition. (3) I, II. Nutrients, their function, metabolism, and relation to health and disease: the digestion, absorption, transport, utilization, and storage of nutrients in humans. Pr.: CHM 110 and 111 or 210; BIOL 198; HN 132, or ASI 318, or consent of instructor.

    HN 413. Science of Food. (4) I, II. Chemical, physical, sensory, and nutritional properties of food related to processes used in food preparation. Two hours lec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 210 and 230.

    HN 450. Nutritional Assessment. (2) II. Methods of nutritional assessment in humans to evaluate dietary intake and body composition; use of biologic markers of human nutritional status. One hour lec. and two hours lab a week. Pr.: HN 400; BIOL 340. For HN and DT majors only.

    HN 499. Problems in Human Nutrition. (Var.) I, II, S. Supervised individual project to study current topics or participation in research. Pr.: Six hours in HN and consent of instructor.

    HN 520. Topics in Human Nutrition. (1-3) On sufficient demand. May be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 hours. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    HN 551. Evaluation of Athletic Injuries of the Extremities. (3) I. This course is designed to familiarize the student athletic trainer with the principles of orthopedic assessment and to apply these principles to specific regions of the body. Knowledge gained in this course may be applicable to other individuals interested in health related professions, which require systematic examination of the body. Pr.: HN 320 and BIOL 340.

    HN 552. Emergency Procedures and Evaluation of Core Athletic Injuries. (3) II. This course is designed to familiarize the student athletic trainer with the procedures of emergency management of athletic injuries and to apply these procedures both on the field and off the field. The student athletic trainer will become familiarized with the principles of orthopedic and emergency medical assessment and to apply these principles to the core of the body. Knowledge gained in this course may be applicable to other individuals interested in health related professions, which require systematic examination of the body in emergency settings. Pr.: HN 320 and BIOL 340.

    HN 555. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training. (3) II. The theory and application of various energy systems used in the treatment of athletic injuries. Practical experiences will be emphasized. Pr.: HN 320, PHYS 115.

    HN 556. Rehabilitation and Conditioning for Athletic Injuries. (3) II. A study of applied rehabilitation and conditioning techniques used by athletic trainers. Pr.: HN 320 and KIN 330.

    HN 557. Seminar in Issues in Administration of Athletic Training Programs. (3) I. Application of various problems and issues affecting the athletic trainers in their roles as administrators in the areas of role delineation, budget designs, legal aspects of sport, facility design, and drug testing/drug education.

    HN 585. Internship in Athletic Training. (1-4) I, II. Supervised clinical application of practical skills in athletic training. Pr.: HN 320. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours with additional prerequisite of KIN 330 and 335 required for last four semesters.

    HN 600. Public Health Nutrition. (3) I. Public health nutrition issues for various segments of the population; nutritional components of community assessment, program planning, and evaluation; and policy issues pertaining to the nutritional status of the population. Pr.: HN 450.

    HN 610. Life Span Nutrition. (3) I. Physiological and environmental influences on nutritional requirements; nutritional problems and eating patterns of age groups throughout the life cycle. Pr.: BIOCH 265, BIOL 340, and HN 400.

    HN 620. Nutrient Metabolism. (4) I. Basic concepts of the mechanisms of actions, interactions, and the processes of cellular assimilation and utilization of nutrients in humans. Emphasis on the coordinated control of nutrient utilization among the major organs. Pr.: HN 400, BIOL 340, and BIOCH 521.

    HN 630. Clinical Nutrition. (5) II. Nutrition in disease including physiological and biochemical basis of nutritional care, effects of disease on nutrient metabolism, diet therapy, nutritional assessment and nutrition counseling. Pr.: HN 620.

    HN 635. Nutrition and Exercise. (3) I. The interrelationships among diet, nutrition, and exercise. Topics covered include physical fitness, weight control, nutrient metabolism during exercise, and athletic performance. Pr.: HN 132 or HN 400; KIN 250, and KIN 335. Cross-listed with KIN 635.

    HN 644. Women, Aging, and Health. (3) II. Risk factors for acute and chronic diseases, health concerns and interests, barriers to obtaining health care, public policies, and future research on women's health issues. Pr.: BIOL 198 and senior standing.

    HN 650. Practicum in Human Nutrition. (Var.) I, II, S. Supervised professional field experience. Pr.: HN 450 and 600 and consent of instructor. May be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 hours.

    HN 660. Nutrition and Food Behavior. (3) I, in even years. Focus on the physiological, environmental, cultural, and economic factors that influence the use of food. Identification of appropriate methodology to study these factors as well as programs to modify food behavior. Pr.: PSYCH 110 or SOCIO 211 or ANTH 200; and HN 400.

    HN 701. Sensory Analysis of Foods. (2-3) I. Sensory analysis of food appearance, texture, aroma, flavor; physiology of sensory receptors; laboratory and consumer panels; and interpretation of data. One hour rec. and three to six hours lab a week. Pr.: STAT 320 or 330 or 340.

    HN 702. Nutrition in Developing Countries. (3) I, in odd years. Nutritional problems in developing countries, including an analysis of factors which contribute to malnutrition, effects of undernutrition, methods for assessing nutritional status, and interventions to combat nutrition problems. Pr.: HN 503 or 610.

    HN 718. Physical Health and Aging. (3) I, alternate odd years. Focus is on the physiological theories of aging, the relationship between normal aging processes, and the major chronic and acute diseases of the elderly, and community health promotion/maintenance programs for older adults. Pr.: BIOL 198 or 310; FSHS 510.

    HN 741. Consumer Response Evaluation. (3) II, odd years. Evaluation of consumer attitudes and perceptions of products to provide quantitative and qualitative information for research guidance. Design and implementation of consumer questionnaires of guides for focus groups and interviews. Two hours lec. and four hours lab a week. Pr.: STAT 320 or 330 or 340.

    HN 780. Problems in Human Nutrition. (Var.) I, II, S. Supervised individual project to study current issues. Pr.: Senior standing or consent of instructor.

    HN 782. Topics in Human Nutrition. (1-3) On sufficient demand. May be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 hours. Pr.: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

    Topics within Human Ecology:
    dDegree Programs dApparel, Textiles, and Interior Design dHotel, Restaurant, Institution Management and Dietetics
    dGeneral Requirements dFamily Studies and Human Services dHuman Nutrition
    dProgram Options dGeneral Human Ecology   
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    Kansas State University
    June 5, 2003