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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2004
    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
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    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    dObjectives and Design Basis
    dGeneral Requirements
    dUniversity General Education
    dDegree Programs
    dProgram Options
    dInterdisciplinary Studies
    dDual Degrees
    dSupport Services
    dResearch Centers
    dExtension and Outreach
    dGeneral Engineering
    dArchitectural Engineering/ Construction Science and Management
    dBiological and Agricultural Engineering
    dChemical Engineering
    dCivil Engineering
    dComputing and Information Sciences
    dElectrical and Computer Engineering
    dIndustrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
    dMechanical and Nuclear Engineering
    Human Ecology
    Technology and Aviation
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Electrical and Computer Engineering

    David L. Soldan, Head

    Professors Carpenter, DeVault, Devore, Dillman, R. Dyer, S. Dyer, Gallagher, Lenhert, Morcos, Pahwa, Rys, and Soldan; Associate Professors Chandra, Day, Gruenbacher, Kuhn, Miller, Starrett, and Warren; Assistant Professor Das; Emeriti: Professors Fowler, Haft, Hummels, Johnson, Kirmser, Koepsel, Lucas, Rathbone, Simons, and Ward; Associate Professor Dollar; Assistant Professor Cottom; Instructor: Wakabayashi.

    E-mail: undergrad@eece.ksu.edu
    www.eece.ksu.edu

    Electrical and computer engineers are involved in the design of electrically oriented systems for a range of applications in modern society. These systems or circuits range from miniature microprocessors through energy conversion systems to giant communication networks and supercomputers. Electrical or computer engineers are involved in every phase of the transmission, conversion, and processing of energy and information for useful purposes both in industry and in our homes.

    Opportunities exist for baccalaureate degree holders to continue education at advanced degree levels or to enter such fields as medicine, law, or management.

    Educational objectives
    The electrical and computer engineering curricula provide course work in the basic sciences, mathematics, and communications skills. They also provide an understanding of the ethical, social, safety, and economic factors required for professional engineering practice. A sequence of general education courses provides depth and breadth to the student's education.

    The electrical engineering curriculum establishes a theoretical basis in circuits, electronics, electromagnetics, energy conversion, and controls. It develops advanced problem solving skills in the student's area of specialization and includes a strong laboratory experience stressing system design and implementation.

    The computer engineering curriculum establishes a theoretical basis for computer components in circuits, electronics, electromagnetics, digital systems, and microprocessors and for software in programming languages, algorithms, data structures, and operating systems. It develops advanced problem solving skills in an environment where hardware and software tradeoffs are necessary. A strong laboratory experience stressing digital and microprocessor system design and implementation is included.

    Through the four years, students are individually advised and counseled by the faculty. At various times during the year, engineers from industry are invited to speak to students on topics of current interest to the profession.

    Curriculum in electrical engineering (EE)
    Bachelor of science in electrical engineering
    129 hours required for graduation
    Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012. 410-347-7700

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    ENGL 100Expository Writing I**3
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    DEN 015New Student Orientation
    14
     
    Spring semester
    CIS 209C Programming for Engineers3
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    16
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    EECE 241Introduction to Computer Engineering3
    MATH 222Analytic Geometry and Calculus III4
    PHYS 213Engineering Physics I5
    CHE 350Engineering Materials2
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    17
     
    Spring semester
    EECE 510Circuit Theory I3
    MATH 240Elementary Differential Equations4
    PHYS 214Engineering Physics II5
    STAT 510Introduction to Probability and Statistics I3
    DEN 275Introduction to Personal and Professional Development1
    16
     
    Junior
    Fall semester
    EECE 501Electrical Engineering Laboratory I2
    EECE 511Circuit Theory II3
    EECE 525Electronics I3
    EECE 431Microcontrollers3
    CE 530Statics and Dynamics3
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    17
     
    Spring semester
    EECE 502Electrical Engineering Lab II2
    EECE 512Linear Systems3
    EECE 526Electronics II3
    EECE 557Electromagnetic Theory I4
    EECE 581Energy Conversion I3
    ENGL 415Written Communication for Engineers**3
    18
     
    Senior
    Fall semester
    EECE 530Control Systems Design3
    ME 513Thermodynamics I3
    Technical electives***9
    15
     
    Spring semester
    EECE 590Seminar1
    Technical electives***12
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    16
     
    *Humanities and social science electives must be selected from the official College of Engineering list. Advisors should be consulted to assure that the College of Engineering UGE requirements are also met (see University General Education section in the engineering portion of this catalog). The electives need not be taken during the semester shown in the curriculum.

    **The prerequisite for ENGL 415 is satisfied with an A or B in ENGL 100 or by completing ENGL 200. Only three hours of ENGL 415 prerequisite courses may be applied to degree requirements.

    ***Technical electives must be selected from the appropriate department lists.

    Electrical engineering options
    General
    In the general option a set of specializations is possible. Students are expected to select a set of interrelated courses that fulfills an engineering design experience and allows for concentration in one area. Examples of such areas are communication systems and signal processing, digital electronics, integrated circuits and devices, and power systems.

    Bioengineering
    Bioengineering is the application of engineering principles to measurement, analysis, and design issues faced by the medical and life science communities. The health care industry is one of the fastest growing business sectors in the United States. Through the bioengineering option, undergraduate students can obtain a B.S. degree in electrical engineering while acquiring a highly marketable biotechnology skill set. Areas of emphasis within this option are medical instrumentation (biosensors and data acquisition tools), biosignal analysis, and biomedical product design.

    Candidates for this option include undergraduate electrical engineering and pre-medicine students who seek a multidisciplinary environment focused upon using technology to increase quality of life. Instructors from various colleges at K-State contribute to this curriculum.

    The curriculum accommodates pre-medicine students through the acceptance of core pre-medicine courses as complementary electives. Students pursuing a pre-medicine program should contact the dean's office at the College of Arts and Sciences for additional information.

    Computer engineering (CMPEN)
    Bachelor of science in computer engineering
    129 hours required for graduation
    Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012. 410-347-7700

    Freshman

    Fall semester
    ENGL 100Expository Writing**3
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    EECE 241Introduction to Computer Engineering3
    DEN 015New Student Orientation
    14
     
    Spring semester
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    CIS 200Fundamentals of Software Design and Implementation4
    ECON 110Principles of Macroeconomics3
    SPCH 105Public Speaking IA2
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    16
     
    Sophomore
    Fall semester
    MATH 222Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    PHYS 213Engineering Physics I5
    CIS 208C Language Lab1
    CIS 300Data and Program Structures3
    DEN 275Introduction to Personal and Professional Development1
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    17
     
    Spring semester
    MATH 240Elementary Differential Equations4
    MATH 510Discrete Math3
    PHYS 214Engineering Physics II5
    EECE 431Microcontrollers3
    EECE 510Circuit Theory I3
    18
     
    Junior
    Fall semester
    CIS 501Software Architecture and Design3
    EECE 511Circuit Theory II3
    EECE 525Electronics I3
    EECE 541Design of Digital Systems3
    STAT 510Introduction to Probability and Statistics3
    15
     
    Spring semester
    EECE 501Electrical Engineering lab I2
    EECE 512Linear Systems3
    EECE 557Electromagnetic Theory I4
    EECE 649Computer Design I3
    Technical electives***3
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    18
     
    Senior
    Fall semester
    CIS 540Software Engineering Project I3
    ENGL 415Written Communication for Engineers**3
    EECE 543Computer Systems Interfacing Lab1
    Technical electives***9
    16
     
    Spring semester
    EECE 590Seminar1
    EECE 643Computer Engineering Design Lab2
    EECE 645Digital Electronics3
    Technical electives***6
    Humanities or social science elective*3
    15
     
    *Humanities and social science electives must be selected from the official College of Engineering list. Advisors should be consulted to assure that the College of Engineering UGE requirements are also met (see University General Education section in the engineering portion of this catalog). The electives need not be taken during the semester shown in the curriculum.

    **The prerequisite for ENGL 415 is satisfied with an A or B in ENGL 100 or by completing ENGL 200. Only three hours of ENGL 415 prerequisite courses may be applied to degree requirements.

    ***Technical electives must be selected to complete one of the areas of specialization.

    Electrical and computer engineering courses
    EECE 241. Introduction to Computer Engineering. (3) I, II. Simple coding schemes, Boolean algebra fundamentals, elements of digital building blocks such as gates, flip-flops, shift registers, memories, etc., basic engineering aspects of computer architecture. Two hours lec. and two hours lab a week.

    EECE 431. Microcontrollers. (3) I, II. Architecture, assembly language, programming, serial and parallel input/output and applications. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 241 and CIS 200 or 209.

    EECE 499. Honors Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering. (Var.) I, II. Individual research problem selected with approval of faculty advisor. Open to students in the College of Engineering honors program. A report is presented orally and in writing during the last semester.

    EECE 501. Electrical Engineering Laboratory I. (2) I, II. Standard laboratory practices including lab notebook, lab reports, statistics, and circuit construction taught using laboratory experiments on basic electrical engineering topics. One hour lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 241, 510 and STAT 510.

    EECE 502. Electrical Engineering Laboratory II. (2) I, II. Continuation of Electrical Engineering Laboratory I. One hour lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 501, 511, and 525. Pr. or conc.: EECE 526.

    EECE 510. Circuit Theory I. (3) I, II. An introduction to linear circuit theory; analysis of linear circuits containing resistance, inductance, and capacitance. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: MATH 222, and PHYS 213.

    EECE 511. Circuit Theory II. (3) I, II. Analysis of electric circuits using differential equations, state equations, transform techniques and linear algebra. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 214, MATH 240, and EECE 510.

    EECE 512. Linear Systems. (3) I, II. An introduction to linear system fundamental concepts and analytical methods. Analytical concepts presented are signal representation and classification, statistical parameters, convolution, Fourier analysis signal sampling, and discrete transforms. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 511, and CIS 208 or 209.

    EECE 519. Electric Circuits and Control. (4) I, II, S. Principles of direct-current circuits and machines, alternating-current circuits and machines, electronics, and application to instrumentation and control. Four hours rec. a week. Not open to EECE students. Pr.: PHYS 214.

    EECE 525. Electronics I. (3) I, II. Fundamentals of electronic components, devices, and circuits. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 510 or 519.

    EECE 526. Electronics II. (3) I, II. Continuation of Electronics I. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 511 and 525.

    EECE 530. Control Systems Design. (3) I, II. Modeling, analysis, and design of control systems. Three hours rec. a week. Pr,: EECE 512.

    EECE 533. Basic Real-Time Electronics. (1) II. Introduction to number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, logic family characteristics, and Programmable Logic Devices. Introduction to finite state machines, memories, analog-to-digital converters, and basic electrical circuit elements. This course is not available to students with credit in EECE 241. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Course meets in one contiguous block of five weeks. Pr.: PHYS 113 or 213.

    EECE 535. Control Systems Laboratory. (3) I, II. The design and testing of feedback control systems. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 431 and EECE 502. Pr. or conc.: EECE 530.

    EECE 541. Design of Digital Systems. (3) I, II. Design of combinational and sequential systems and peripheral interfaces. Emphasis is placed on hardware description languages, computer aided design tools and simulations. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 431 and 510 or EECE 431 and PHYS 214.

    EECE 542. Local Area Networking. (3) I, II. An introduction to data communication concepts used in the network, data link, and physical layers of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model. Hardware and software aspects of data communications as well as modern Local Area Network (LAN) standards will be emphasized. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 241, high-level programming language.

    EECE 543. Computer System Interfacing Lab. (1) I, II. Practical aspects of computer system interfacing including concepts of hardware and software design and debugging. Additionally implementations of interrupts and device drivers will be covered. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: CIS 208 or 209 and EECE 541.

    EECE 557. Electromagnetic Theory I. (4) I, II. Vector analysis, electrostatics, magnetostatics, Faraday's Law, Maxwell's Equations, transmission lines, and applications. Four hours rec. a week. Pr.: PHYS 214 and EECE 510.

    EECE 571. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. (1) II. Introduction to quantitative analysis techniques as applied to the study of physiological systems and their associated biological signals. One hour rec. a week. Pr.: MATH 222.

    EECE 581. Energy Conversion. (3) I, II. Energy conversion principles and their application to electric energy converters operating in the static and the dynamic mode. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 510 or EECE 519.

    EECE 589. Circuits and Machines Lab. (2) I, II. Practical aspects of electrical circuits, transformers, and electrical motors and generators. One hour lec. and two hours lab a week. Not open to EECE students. Pr.: EECE 519.

    EECE 590. Seminar. (1) I, II. Preparation and oral presentation of a written technical report. One hour rec. a week. Pr.: DEN 275 and ENGL 415.

    EECE 603. Advanced Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2) On sufficient demand. A project-oriented laboratory in which a small group of students works with a faculty member in a special area of interest. Projects usually involve design, measurement methods, or experimental work. May be repeated once. Pr.: EECE 502.

    EECE 624. Power Electronics. (3) I. Theory and application of semiconductor devices to the control and conversion of electric power, control of DC and AC machines, design of electronic power circuits such as controlled rectifiers, converters and inverters, using diodes, diacs, thyristors, triacs, and power transistors. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 581, 511, and 525.

    EECE 628. Electronic Instrumentation. (3) I, II. Applications of electronics in the design of analog and digital systems for the measurement of physical variables and in the transduction of these variables into a useful form for both recording and control. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 502 and 526.

    EECE 631. Microcomputer Systems Design. (3) I, II. Design and engineering application of 16 and 32 bit microcomputers to instrumentation and control. Investigate the relationship of the C language and assembly language. Timing and other interfacing problems will be covered. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CIS 208 or 209; either EECE 431/501/525, or ME 535.

    EECE 636. Introduction to Computer Graphics. (3) I, II. An introduction to the hardware and software aspects of graphics generation. Programming assignments will provide practical experience in implementing and using standard graphics primitives and user interfaces. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: CIS 208 or 209, 300 and MATH 222 or 551.

    EECE 641. Advanced Digital Design using Logic Synthesis. (3) II. Applications of hardware description languages (HDLs) for the design of complex digital systems. Topics include designing and simulating using HDLs, logic synthesis into FPGAs and ASICs, optimization techniques, timing issues, hardware verification, and design for testability. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 541.

    EECE 643. Computer Engineering Design Lab. (2) I, II. The design and construction of small computer systems covering necessary practical considerations such as signal propagation and timing. Three hours lab a week. Pr. or conc.: EECE 543 and 649.

    EECE 645. Digital Electronics. (3) I, II. The characteristics and performance of the major contemporary digital logic families. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 525, 557, and 541.

    EECE 647. Digital Filtering. (3) I. Difference equation characterization of digital filters, transient and steady-state analysis of digital filters using the Z-transform, spectral analysis of digital signals, design and implementation of digital filters. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 512.

    EECE 649. Computer Design I. (3) I, II. Concepts of computer design. Information representation, instruction sets, and addressing modes. Arithmetic and logic unit design for fixed and floating point operations. Hardwired and microprogrammed control design. Concepts of pipelining, CISC and RISC architecture. Memory system design including virtual memory, caches, and interleaved memories. I/O design methods, interrupt mechanisms, DMA and system integration. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 541.

    EECE 659. Wave Guides, Antennas, and Propagation. (3) I, in even years. Applications of Maxwell's equations to boundary value problems, guided transmission, cavities, radiation, and propagation. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 557.

    EECE 660. Communication Systems I. (3) I. Introduction to the analysis and design of analog and digital communication systems. Topics include analog and digital modulation schemes, digital encoding of messages, mathematical modeling of communication systems, noise in communication links, and calculation of performance measures for practical links. Three hours rec. a week. Pr. or conc.: EECE 512.

    EECE 661. Communications Systems II. (3) II. Analysis and design of digital communications systems. Topics include signal spaces, the derivation of optimum receivers for the white noise channel, modeling of bandpass systems, determination of the power spectrum of a random digital signal, multiple access methods, fading channels, error correction codes, and simulation of practical digital transmission systems. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 660.

    EECE 662. Design of Communication Circuits. (3) I, II. The design of communication circuits and systems operating from baseband to UHF frequencies. Topics include tuned-RF amplifiers, FR oscillators, frequency mixers, LC and ceramic bandpass filters, and demodulator circuits. Projects involve the design and performance testing of a complete radio receiver using surface mount discretes and IC components. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 526 and 502.

    EECE 663. Digital Error Control Coding. (3) II, in odd years. An introduction to the subject of error-correcting and error-detecting codes, both block and convolutional. Emphasis is placed on practical means of encoding and decoding the most commonly used codes such as Hamming, BCH, and Reed-Solomon codes. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 241, STAT 510, and CIS 208 or 209.

    EECE 664. Design of Microwave Circuits. (3) I. The design of communication circuits and systems operating at microwave frequencies. Topics include antennas, transmission lines, microstrip matching networks, S-parameters, frequency synthesizers, and downconverter components such as LNAs, mixers, and microstrip bandpass filters. Projects involve design, simulation with Electronic Design Automation tools, and laboratory measurements. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 502, 512, 526, and 557.

    EECE 670. Engineering Applications of Machine Intelligence. (3) II. Study of machine intelligence and fuzzy logic concepts and applications in engineering problem domains. As a term project, develop a fuzzy expert system for a specific problem domain that runs on a personal computer and develop the supporting documentation. Pr.: CIS 200 or 209, and PHYS 214. Three hours rec. a week.

    EECE 681. Wind Engineering. (3) On sufficient demand. Wind characteristics, turbine performance, synchronous and asynchronous electrical loads, siting, economics, and wind farm design. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ME 512 or CE 530; and EECE 525 or 519.

    EECE 684. Power Laboratory. (3) II. Introduction to power system and device analysis. Course includes lecture and laboratory experience in aspects of power flow, system operation, power quality, power electronics, and economic analysis. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 501, 525, and 581.

    EECE 685. Power Systems Design. (3) I. A comprehensive study of modeling of the electric power system components and computer simulation of interconnected power systems in steady state. Vector-matrix descriptions are emphasized. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 581.

    EECE 686. Power Systems Protection. (3) II. Analysis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults on power systems using symmetrical components technique. Study of protective relaying for protection of power systems against faults. Vector-matrix descriptions and computer solutions are emphasized. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 581.

    EECE 690. Problems in Electrical and Computer Engineering. (Var.) I, II, S.

    EECE 694. Optoelectronics. (3) I. Applied geometric and physical optics, optical radiation, and the interaction of light and matter. The theory and application of photodetectors, lasers, and other photoemitters. Introduction to fiber optical waveguides, sensors, and systems. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 525, 557, and CHE 350.

    EECE 696. Integrated Circuit Design. (3) I. Study of silicon integrated circuits with emphasis on CMOS analog and digital applications. The course covers basic device structure and modeling, circuit analysis, system design, IC design methodology and economics, plus IC fabrication processes. Computer-aided design tools are used to simulate and layout circuits designed by student groups. The circuits are fabricated by an external service (MOSIS). Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 241 and 525.

    EECE 725. Integrated Circuit Devices and Processes. (3) II. An introduction to integrated circuit fabrication processes including oxidation, diffusion, masking, etching, process monitoring and device characterization. Design of bipolar and MOS circuits through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 696 and CHE 350.

    EECE 728. Mixed Signal Measurements. (3) II. Signal classification, noise and uncertainty, TRMS conversion, quantization and ADCs, repetitive sampling and signal recovery techniques, vector voltmeters, basic network analyzers. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 512 or graduate standing.

    EECE 730. Control Systems Analysis and Design. (3) On sufficient demand. Use of classical analysis techniques for control system compensation. State space control theory fundamentals are presented in addition to an introductory treatment of several major systems areas. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 530 or ME 640. Same as ME 730.

    EECE 731. Advanced Microcomputer System Design. (3) II, in even years. Design and engineering applications of 16 and 32 bit microprocessors. Utilization of peripheral and co- processor chips. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 631.

    EECE 733. Real-Time Embedded Systems Design. (3) I. Design and implementation of a comprehensive team project of a complete embedded real-time system. Two hours rec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CIS 721.

    EECE 736. Discrete-Time and Computer-Control Systems. (3) II. Analysis and design of discrete-time, sampled-data, and computer-control systems using discrete- state equations and Z-transforms. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 530 or ME 640.

    EECE 746. Fault Diagnosis in Digital Systems. (3) II, in odd years. Hazards, fault detection in combinational circuits, and sequential machines using path sensitizing and fault-matrix methods, state table analysis, etc.; system reliability through logical redundance. Three hours rec. a week. Pr. or conc.: EECE 541 or 631.

    EECE 747. Digital Signal Processing Laboratory. (3) II. Digitization of analog signals; demonstration of aliasing problems; spectral analysis of digital signals using Fourier and other signal representation techniques; digital filtering problems; applications related to biomedical and speech data. Two hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 512. Pr. or conc.: EECE 647.

    EECE 749. Computer Design II. (3) I. Study of alternate computer hardware structures. Investigation of engineering tradeoffs in implementation of alternative instruction sets and computing structures. Emphasis will be placed on a quantitative approach to cost/performance evaluations including simulation of hardware structures. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 649.

    EECE 758. Electromagnetic Theory II. (3) I, in odd years. Continuation of EECE 557. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: EECE 557.

    EECE 765. Digital Radio Hardware Design. (3). On sufficient demand. Advanced topics in digital radio communication systems. Topics include the design and application of state-of-the-art RF and baseband circuits found in products ranging from cordless and cellular phones to wireless local area networks. Systems-level issues including coding, duplexing, and multiple access techniques are also covered, and a team-based project provides experience with RF hardware research and development activities. Three hours a week. Pr.: EECE 662, 664, 696, or consent of instructor.

    EECE 771. Control Theory Applied to Bioengineering. (3) II. Development of mathematical models used in the study and analysis of physiological control systems providing techniques for varying pertinent biological parameters. Three hours rec. a week. Pr. or conc.: EECE 530 or ME 640, and a basic physiology course.

    EECE 772. Theory and Techniques of Bioinstrumentation. (2) I. Theoretical aspects of biological signals, electrodes, transducers, digital imaging, and computer-based data acquisition directed toward EECE and other science department majors. Two hours rec. a week. Pr.: Conc. enrollment in EECE 773 (EECE majors only) and AP 773.

    EECE 773. Bioinstrumentation Design Laboratory. (1) I. Design and testing of hardware and software for acquiring and analyzing biological signals. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: EECE 502; conc. enrollment in EECE 772 and AP 773.

    EECE 780. Power Seminar. (1) I, II. Speakers from industry, academia, and government present topics related to power systems engineering. May be repeated with instructor permission. One hour lec. a week. Pr.: Junior standing.

    Topics within Engineering:
    dObjectives and Design Basis dSupport Services dCivil Engineering
    dGeneral Requirements dResearch Centers dComputing and Information Sciences
    dUniversity General Education dExtension and Outreach dElectrical and Computer Engineering
    dDegree Programs dGeneral Engineering dIndustrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
    dProgram Options dArchitectural Engineering/ Construction Science and Management dMechanical and Nuclear Engineering
    dInterdisciplinary Studies dBiological and Agricultural Engineering   
    dDual Degrees dChemical Engineering   
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    Kansas State University
    June 5, 2003