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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2004
    About the Catalog
    About the University
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    Agriculture
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    Arts and Sciences
    dMajors and Degrees
    dDegree Requirements
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences
    dBachelor of Fine Arts
    dBachelor of Music
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    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley
    dDean of Arts and Sciences Courses
    dProgram Options
    dAdvising
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    dPhysics
    dPolitical Science
    dPsychology
    dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
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    Graduate School
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    University Faculty
     

    Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance

    David Procter, Head

    Associate Professors K. Anderson, Davy, Goulden, Griffin, MacFarland, Maullar, Orlock, Pinkston, Procter, Schenck-Hamlin, Shelton, Uthoff, and Yagerline; Assistant Professors Bailey and Yum; Instructors P. Anderson, Brown, Hansen, and Stanfield; Emeriti: Professors Fedder and Zivanovic; Associate Professor Hinrichs; Assistant Professor Ross.

    www.ksu.edu/sctd

    The Department of Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance offers study in rhetoric/ communication, linguistics, theatre, and dance.

    All undergraduate majors require SCTD 100 plus 6 hours in other areas within the department. See speech secondary education requirements, College of Education, for teacher certification.

    Rhetoric and communication
    Rhetoric, one of the original liberal arts, is concerned with the theory, criticism, and practice of communication. The rhetoric/communication program has two instructional goals. First, the program attempts to improve a student's communication skills in developing messages that are clear, coherent, reasoned, and fluent. Course work in public speaking, group and interpersonal communication, and co-curricular activities in debate and forensics provide opportunities to acquire practical communication skills. Second, the program attempts to develop a student's ability to analyze communication in different social, political, and organizational settings. Course work in theory, history, and criticism focuses on the study of speech and language used to achieve practical ends. A major in rhetoric/communication would be appropriate for anyone who plans to enter a career that is communication-intensive, such as law, education, public relations, or government.

    An undergraduate major in rhetoric/communication is required to take 38 hours of course work in the Department of Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance, distributed as follows:

    Note: Students must achieve a grade of B or better in the two foundational theory courses, SPCH 320 and SPCH 330, before they are permitted to enroll in SPCH 550 Senior Colloquium.

    Rhetorical and communication theory7
     
    SPCH 080Speech Seminar
    SPCH 320Theories of Human Communication3
    SPCH 330Rhetoric of Western Thought3
    SPCH 550Senior Colloquium1
     
    Guided electives12
    Choose two of the following courses in rhetoric:
    SPCH 331Criticism of Public Discourse3
    SPCH 432Rhetoric of the American Presidency3
    SPCH 434Rhetoric of Social Movements3
    SPCH 435Political Communication3
    SPCH 460Rhetoric of the 60's3
     
    Choose two of the following courses in communication:
    SPCH 322Interpersonal Communication3
    SPCH 323Nonverbal Communication3
    SPCH 326Small Group Discussion Methods3
    SPCH 526Persuasion3
     
    Rhetoric/communication electives12
    Must be 300-level or above with at least 3 credit hours numbered 400 or above.
     
    Other department courses7
    SCTD 1001
    2 courses in theatre, linguistics, or dance6
     
    Rhetoric/communication minor
    The Department of Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance offers a minor in rhetoric and communication.

    SPCH 080Speech Seminar
    SPCH 320Theory of Human Communication3
    SPCH 330Rhetoric of Western Thought3
    Four guided electives (at least one SPCH 400 or above)
    chosen from: SPCH 311, 319, 321, 322, 323, 325, 326
    328, 331, 425, 426, 430, 432, 434, 435, 450, 460, 520, 525, 526, 630, 720, 721, 725, 726,
    730, 732, 733, 735)12
    18
     
    Linguistics
    There is general agreement that nothing is more characteristically human than the ability to use language. Linguists, however, usually do not study languages in order to become proficient in speaking, reading, or writing them. In linguistics we are interested in discovering all the principles that, in a sense, define each language, how it works, how it has changed through time and geographical distribution, as well as how children learn to speak, and how people use language.

    There are relationships between linguistics and many other disciplines (see Linguistics, in the general information for the College of Arts and Sciences). Students are encouraged to explore as many of these relationships as they can as undergraduates, especially if they anticipate going on to graduate study.

    Theatre and dance
    The mission of the theatre program is to develop human potential, expand knowledge, and enrich cultural understanding and expression through high quality undergraduate and graduate education. Through scholarship/ research, service, and production, the theatre program seeks to train future artists, scholars and teachers of theatre, and to inform the nonmajor, the university at large, and the surrounding community of the value of theatre to individuals and society.

    The major in theatre emphasizes the education of students for professional career goals or for cultural enrichment as an avocation. The objective of the program is to offer broad training, but also the possibility of specialization. Training is available in all areas of theatre, including scenic, costume, lighting and sound design, theatre history and literature, acting, directing, playwriting, management, drama therapy, and dance. The goals of the program are to offer a liberal arts program in theatre; to prepare students for advanced professional training or graduate school; and to provide the basic theatre skills for the bachelor's candidate. K-State is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Theater.

    A major consists of 41 hours in theatre, SCTD 100 (1) and 6 hours in tool courses in other areas of the department. (The course used to satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences requirement of one course in public speaking may not be counted as part of these 6 hours.) The 41 hours in theatre must be distributed as follows:

    Four semesters of Theatre Forum are also required.
    A theatre core of 25 hours:
    THTRE 080Theatre Forum
    THTRE 162Concepts of Theatre Production1
    THTRE 261Fundamentals of Acting3
    THTRE 267Fundamentals of Stage Costuming and Makeup3
    THTRE 368Fundamentals of Technical Production3
    THTRE 369Introduction to Theatrical Design3
    THTRE 370Dramatic Structure3
    THTRE 565Principles of Directing3
    THTRE 572History of Theatre I3
    THTRE 573History of Theatre II3
     
    Twelve additional hours in theatre courses numbered 500 or above (excluding THTRE 566 and 710).
     
    Four hours of production work distributed as follows:
    Two hours in THTRE 211 Drama Participation: One hour in conjunction with THTRE 368 Fundamentals of Technical Production; one hour with THTRE 267 Fundamentals of Stage Costuming and Makeup.
     
    Two hours in THTRE 710 Practicum in Theatre, or in THTRE 566 Rehearsal Techniques, for work in a production.
     
    There will be a written evaluation of all production work required for the major at the end of each semester.
     
    Theatre minor
    The Department of Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance offers a minor in theatre.

    THTRE 162Concepts of Theatre Production1
    THTRE 261Fundamentals of Acting3
    THTRE 369Introduction to Theatrical Design3
    THTRE 370Dramatic Structure3
    THTRE 572Theatre History 13
    or
    THTRE 573Theatre History 2
    6 credit hours of electives: *(See note below)6
    19
     
    *Excluded from counting toward electives are: THTRE 165, 211, 566, 710

    Concentration in dance
    A concentration in dance requires the following:

    Core
    DANCE 195Improvisational Structures2
    DANCE 200Anatomy for Dancers1
    DANCE 205Dance as an Art Form3
    DANCE 225Principles of Rhythmic Notation1
    DANCE 295Dance Composition I3
    DANCE 321Variations and Partnering1
    DANCE 380Musical Stage Dance2
    DANCE 405Applied Movement Fundamentals3
    DANCE 420Dance/Theatre Lab (required each
    semester)
    DANCE 495Dance Composition II3
    DANCE 502Performance Production
    (minimum of 3 semesters)1-2
    DANCE 504Performance Aesthetics3
    DANCE 505Methods and Materials of Teaching
    Dance2
    DANCE 506Dance Education Fieldwork1
    DANCE 510Senior Project2
    DANCE 520Principles of Dance Technology3
    THTRE 261Fundamentals of Acting3
    THTRE 211Drama Participation (with
    THTRE 267 and 368)2
    THTRE 267Fundamentals of Stage Costume
    Design3
    THTRE 368Fundamentals of Technical
    Production3
     
    Elective
    Choose one
    ART 100Design I2
    ART 190Drawing I2
    HIST 459History of Dance in Its Cultural
    Setting3
    KIN 455Movement Exploration and Creative
    Dance for Children3
    46-51
     
    Dance technique
    Proficiency must be demonstrated by successful completion with a minimum grade of B of Level III in one technique and Level II in another. Enrollment in a minimum of one technique course and DANCE 420 is required each semester.

    Dance courses are listed after theatre courses.
     
    Dance minor
    The Department of Speech Communication, Theatre, and Dance offers a minor in dance.

    DANCE 205Dance as an Art Form3
    DANCE 195Improvisational Structures2
    DANCE 225Principles of Rhythmic Notation1
    DANCE 295Dance Composition I3
    DANCE 200Anatomy for Dancers1
    DANCE 321Variations and Partnering1
    DANCE 380Musical Stage Dance2
    DANCE 420Dance/Theatre Lab (4 semesters)
    DANCE 502Performance Production
    (minimum of three semesters)1-2
    Plus one of the following:3
    DANCE 405, 495, 504, (505 and 506) or 520
    17-18
     
    Dance technique
    Proficiency must be demonstrated by successful completion with a minimum grade of B in Level III in one technique and Level II in another. Enrollment in a minimum of one technique course and DANCE 420 is required for 4 semesters.
    Quiz-out
    Students may earn 3 hours of credit for Public Speaking I by completing the quiz-out option with a grade of C or better. Students electing this option must (a) enroll in quiz-out as specified in the current schedule of classes; and (b) attend a mandatory informational meeting at the beginning of that semester.

    Speech communication, theatre, and dance courses
    SCTD 100. Introduction to Speech Communication, Theatre and Dance. (1) I. An exploration of the disciplines and connections constituting the Department of Speech Communication, Theatre and Dance.

    Rhetoric and communication courses
    SPCH 065. Spoken English for International Students. (3) I, II. Intensive practice in spoken American English for increased fluency and overall comprehensibility.

    SPCH 080. Speech Seminar. (0) Special topics and lectures for speech majors. Required of all majors.

    SPCH 090. Teaching Public Speaking I and IA. (0) Seminar for graduate teaching assistants in strategies, techniques, and materials for the introductory public speaking course; includes current practices and research in communication education. Enrollment limited to graduate teaching assistants in the Department of Speech.

    SPCH 105. Public Speaking 1A. (2) I, II, S. Alternate to SPCH 106. Principles and practice of message preparation, audience analysis, presentational skills, and speech criticism. Primarily granted for students whose curricula require a 2-credit hour course. Credit not granted for both SPCH 105 and 106.

    SPCH 106. Public Speaking I. (3) I, II, S. Principles and practice of message preparation, audience analysis, presentational skills, and speech criticism permitting greater practice in oral presentation. Credit not granted for both SPCH 105 and 106.

    SPCH 109. Public Speaking 1A, Honors. (3) Honors speech preparation and delivery; a survey of topics basic to rhetoric, communication, and linguistics. For arts and sciences honors students.

    SPCH 210. Forensics Participation. (1-2) I, II. Intercollegiate debate or individual events. Four hours maximum credit. Pr.: Consent of director of the activity.

    University General Education courseSPCH 311. Business and Professional Speaking. (3) I, II. Principles and practice of speaking in an organizational setting. Areas of emphasis will be oral reports, interviewing, interpersonal communication, and working in groups. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 319. Intercollegiate Forensics. (3) I. Current practices and theories for competitive intercollegiate forensics activity. Pr.: Consent of director of the activity. May not be taken concurrently with SPCH 210.

    SPCH 320. Theories of Human Communication. (3) I. Survey of basic theories of human communication focusing on sending, receiving, and responding to messages face-to-face. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    University General Education courseSPCH 321. Public Speaking II. (3) I, II. Advanced principles and practice of speech composition, audience adaptation, and delivery. Pr.: SPCH 105 or SPCH 106.

    SPCH 322. Interpersonal Communication. (3) I, II, S. Examination of the dynamics of face-to-face interpersonal interaction. Focus is on applying principles of relational communication.

    SPCH 323. Nonverbal Communication. (3) II. Analysis of nonverbal communication in human interaction; theory and research in kinesics, proxemics, and paralinguistics. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    University General Education courseSPCH 325. Argumentation and Debate. (3) II. Basic theories of argumentation with emphasis on the construction and criticism of well reasoned and supported positions. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    University General Education courseSPCH 326. Small Group Discussion Methods. (3) I, II, S. Basic concepts of small group decision making. Projects emphasize participation in and analysis of communication in the small group. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 328. Professional Interviewing. (3) Investigation of interviewing as it occurs in a variety of situations, including journalistic, diagnostic, persuasive, and managerial. Emphasis on developing practical skills in planning, managing interviews, and interpreting data in the professional context. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 330. Rhetoric in Western Thought. (3) I. An introduction to the figures, concepts, and trends in the development of rhetorical theory from classical to modern times. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 331. Criticism of Public Discourse. (3) II. An examination of public influence based on study of historical and contemporary models of rhetorical criticism. The students' critical experiences will focus on a broad array of public discourse including political, social, and cultural messages.

    University General Education courseSPCH 399. Sophomore Honors Seminar. (3) Open only to qualified students in the arts and sciences honors program.

    SPCH 425. Theories of Organizational Communication. (3) II. Review the literature and develop research projects regarding basic variables of communication in organizational contexts. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 426. Coaching and Directing Speech Activities. (3) I. Current practices in coaching curricular and extra-curricular speech activities with practical experience in the problems and procedures of directing a forensic program. Pr.: Six hours of general speech or theatre courses that are 200 level or above, SPCH 325, and THTRE 263.

    SPCH 430. Freedom of Speech. (3) II. A study of communication and legal principles pertaining to freedom of expression, and an examination of their implications for competing interests such as public order, national security, morality, civil rights, and fairness.

    SPCH 432. The Rhetoric of the American Presidency. (3) An examination of the American presidency from a rhetorical perspective, emphasizing the symbolic resources and duties of the office and those who hold it. Special attention paid to the public discourse of recent presidents during moments of national crisis. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 434. Rhetoric and Social Movements. (3) II. A study of the scope and functions of persuasive communication in contemporary social movements. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 435. Political Communication. (3) II. A study of political discourse. Attention is directed to theory that encompasses political discourse as it affects political behavior. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 450. Special Studies in Human Discourse. (Var.) A study of selected subjects in the analysis and practice of human communication. Repeatable with change in topic. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 460. Rhetoric of the Sixties. (3) I. Rhetorical interpretation of the social and political forces dominating the decade and an examination of the forms of persuasion which these forces brought to life. Emphasizes political leadership, pressures for social change, foreign policy, and transformation of the rhetorical environment. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 480. Intercultural Communication. (3) I. A study of the relationship between language and culture and its impact on human communication. Examines how language and culture differ among people and how differences are handled through the process of communication. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    SPCH 498. Honors Tutorial in Speech. (1-3) I, II. Individual directed research and study of a topic in speech, normally as a preliminary to writing a senior honors thesis. May be repeated once to a total of 3 hours. Pr.: Sophomore standing, membership in the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences, and permission of the instructor.

    SPCH 525. Argumentation Theory. (3) II. An advanced study of prominent argumentation theorists with an in-depth examination of special topics concerning the philosophy, theory, and practice of argumentation. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    University General Education courseSPCH 526. Persuasion. (3) II. The study of communication as persuasion; examination of contemporary approaches to persuasion.

    SPCH 550. Senior Colloquium. (1) I, II. A demonstration of the mastery of vocabulary, theory, and the ability to make practical applications of the study of rhetoric and communication will be required of all senior rhetoric communication majors. Mastery will be demonstrated by writing a senior thesis and presenting the results of that thesis to the assembled rhetoric communication faculty and majors in a required colloquium.

    SPCH 630. Special Topics in Rhetoric and Communication. (3) II. Intensive study of selected topics in communication and rhetoric. Repeatable with change in topic. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    SPCH 710. Introduction to Communication Research Methods. (3) I. Introduction to descriptive and experimental methodologies in communication, including conceptualization and operationalization of communication concepts, strategies of research design, and logic of inquiry. Pr.: SPCH 320.

    SPCH 716. Small Group Communication. (3) I, in alternate years. Review literature and develop research projects pertaining to the communication processes in small task groups. Topics to include: group communication processes, barriers to group communication, and style-specific theories of effective group communications. Pr.: SPCH 326 or senior standing.

    SPCH 720. Perspectives on Communication. (3) Analysis of current perspectives on the communication process. Materials cover assumptions, principles, implications, and selected research within each perspective. Pr.: SPCH 320.

    SPCH 721. Language and Social Interaction. (3) II. Study of the epistemological, social, and behavioral functions of language in communication. Examination of the processes by which language functions to construct one's worldview and guide individual action. Pr.: SPCH 320 or LING 280 or ANTH 220; junior standing.

    SPCH 722. Instructional Communication. (3) II. Study of theory and practice of communication in the classroom including both teacher and student communication. Topics include integration of modes of communication, language choices, power, humor, communication strategies for instruction, and impact of communication on learning. Same as EDCIP 722.

    SPCH 725. History of American Public Address. (3) Study of American speakers, from the time of Jonathan Edwards to the present, including their training, speeches, and effectiveness. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    SPCH 726. Seminar in Persuasion. (3) II, in odd years. Survey and analysis of advanced theory and experimental studies in persuasion. Pr.: Junior standing.

    SPCH 730. Classical Rhetorical Theory. (3) Study of rhetorical theory and criticism from early Greek to Roman times. Pr.: SPCH 330 or graduate standing.

    SPCH 731. Nineteenth Century Rhetorical Theory. (3) Study of the influences on and developments of rhetorical theory in nineteenth-century America as manifested in educational and public settings. Pr.: SPCH 730.

    SPCH 732. Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. (3) II. Study of major European and American contributors to rhetorical theory in the twentieth century. Pr.: SPCH 730.

    SPCH 733. Rhetorical Criticism. (3) II. Study of traditional and contemporary approaches to the analysis of public discourse. Pr.: SPCH 330.

    SPCH 735. Leadership Communication. (3) II in alternate years. Review the literature and develop research projects regarding the communication processes by which people move from operating as individuals into groups with a sense of groupself and, further, into groups or organizations that require leadership. Pr.: SPCH 311 or 326, or 425.

    SPCH 799. Problems in Speech. (Var.) Open to students in any speech area. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    Linguistics courses
    LING 280. Introduction to the Study of Language. (3) I, II. Survey of the scientific study of language. Contributions of linguistics to an understanding of the nature of language. Presupposes no previous knowledge of linguistics.

    LING 594. Comanche Texts. (3) I or II, in alternate years. General introduction to Comanche grammatical and discourse systems and study of oral narratives: published and unpublished texts including coyote stories, adventure stories, personal recollections, etc. Some attention to pronunciation, but major emphasis on the development of a basic reading ability and understanding of the world portrayed in the narratives. Same as LG 594.

    LING 595. Archeological Decipherment. (3) I or II, in alternate years. The art and science of four famous cases of decipherment: Mesopotamian cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphics, Creto-Mycenaean Linear B, and on-going work on the Maya script. Characteristics of successful decipherments and resultant increases in knowledge about the history of writing and the richness of various cultures of the past. Same as LG 595.

    LING 600. Principles of Linguistics. (3) The scientific study of language, with examples from English, Spanish, French, German, and others. Overview of language origins, phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, dialects, language change, and writing systems. Same as ENGL 600 and LG 600.

    LING 601. General Phonetics. (3) I or II, in alternate years. Description and classification of speech sounds according to point and manner of articulation. Transcription in the International Phonetic Association Alphabet. Includes sounds of English, French, Spanish, German, and others. Same as ENGL 601 and LG 601.

    LING 602. Historical Linguistics. (3) I or II, in alternate years. Internal and comparative reconstruction of earlier forms of languages. Genetic relationships in language families, and various typological considerations. Includes French, Spanish, and others. Same as ENGL 602 and LG 602.

    LING 603. Topics in Linguistics. (1-3) I or II, in alternate years. Seminar on a special topic in linguistics: decipherment of ancient writing systems, linguistics applied to the teaching of English or other languages, discourse analysis (especially of spoken texts), etc. Topic to be announced for semester in which offered. Repeatable for credit on a different topic. Same as ENGL 603 and LG 603.

    LING 783. Phonology I. (3) Basic concepts of the theory of language sound systems with particular reference to English but including reference to other languages as well. Pr.: SPCH or ENGL 681 and SPCH, ENGL, or MLANG 780. Same as ENGL 783 and LG 783.

    LING 785. Syntax I. (3) Basic concepts of syntactic theory, with particular reference to English but including reference to the grammatical systems of other languages as well. Pr.: ENGL 530 or SPCH, ENGL, or LG 780. Same as ENGL 785 and LG 785.

    LING 792. Field Methods in Linguistics. (3) On sufficient demand. Techniques of collecting and analyzing linguistic data in the field. Work with language consultants in class, on languages such as Swahili. Pr.: Consent of the instructor. Same as LG 792 and ANTH 792.

    LING 796. Theories of Grammar. (3) I, S. Comparative examination of the assumptions, aims, and procedures of four types of English grammar—the normative grammar of Robert Lowth, the historical grammar of Otto Jespersen, the structural grammar of Leonard Bloomfield, and the generative-transformational grammar of Noam Chomsky—and their application. Same as ENGL 796. Pr.: Junior standing, and ENGL 530 or LING 600.

    Theatre courses
    THTRE 080. Theatre Forum. (0) I, II. Special topics presentations for theatre majors. Four semesters required for all majors.

    THTRE 162. Concepts of Theatre Production. (1) I. An orientation to the various areas of theatrical production in the rehearsal and performance process. Required of all majors in their second spring semester.

    THTRE 211. Drama Participation. (0-2) I, II. Work in theatrical productions. Four hours maximum credit. Pr.: Consent of director of activity.

    THTRE 235. Introduction to the Art of Film. (3) Examination of the means of creating film art. Attention to techniques employed by successful directors, writers, and producers.

    THTRE 253. Multicultural Storytelling. (2) Intersession only. Development of oral performance skills in storytelling, with emphasis on cultural/ethnic diversities. Students will do individual research on cultural/ethnic area of their choice.

    THTRE 260. Stage Movement. (3) A study of the technique of stage movement and an investigation of the language of gesture.

    University General Education courseTHTRE 261. Fundamentals of Acting. (3) Theory and practice of fundamental skills and techniques of acting. Major emphasis is on freeing and training the individual's imagination, intellect, body, and voice through designed exercise and performed scenes. Three hours rec. per week.

    THTRE 263. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (3) Techniques of reading from the printed page, selecting portions from various forms of literature, including narrative poetry, essay, lyric, sonnet, nonfictional prose, scenes from plays, and selected short stories.

    THTRE 265. Fundamentals of Improvisation I, II. (3) Introduction to the techniques of improvisation with the emphasis upon practical participation.

    THTRE 267. Fundamentals of Stage Costuming and Makeup. (3) I, II. Basic techniques of stage costume construction and stage make-up. Examination of the costume design process. Conc. enrollment in at least one credit of THTRE 211 required.

    THTRE 268. Techniques of Makeup. (1) Techniques of makeup for stage, movies, and television.

    University General Education courseTHTRE 270. Introduction to Theatre. (3) A comprehensive introduction to theatre: basic elements of theater and theater production, theater history, dramatic literature, multicultural theater traditions and perspectives, and the theatre experience.

    THTRE 275. Summer Theatre Workshop. (0-6) S. Supervised participation in a summer theatre repertory/ stock program. Limited to freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 330. Dramatic Comedy and the Theory of Laughter. (3) Intersession only. An examination of the origin, structure, and historical development of dramatic comedy, with a special emphasis on the psychology of laughter. Representative essays expounding various theories of the comic.

    University General Education courseTHTRE 361. Intermediate Acting. (3) Emphasis upon expanding the actor's capabilities through more advanced scene work and character study. Pr.: THTRE 261 and consent of instructor.

    THTRE 368. Fundamentals of Technical Production. (3) I. Basic techniques, equipment and materials used in scenery construction and theatrical drafting. Conc. enrollment in at least 1 hour of THTRE 211 is required.

    THTRE 369. Introduction to Theatrical Design. (3) An exploration of the four areas of stage design: sets, lights, costumes, and sound. Incudes examination of relevant history and technology in these areas. Emphasis is on the design process and design development.

    THTRE 370. Dramatic Structure. (3) Fundamentals of play analysis for directors with emphasis upon concepts of form, style, characterization, discovery, and reversal. Includes practice in analyzing plays of various forms and styles.

    THTRE 475. Opera Workshop. (1-6) Principles and techniques of operatic and musical theatre production, with emphasis on class rehearsal and performance of selected scenes from opera and musical drama; brief survey of the history of opera. Offered jointly by the Departments of Speech and Music. Same as MUSIC 475.

    THTRE 579. Fundamentals of Stage Lighting. (3) Theory and practice of theatrical lighting design, control systems, projection equipment, and lighting consulting. Production work with KSU Theatre season required. Pr.: THTRE 369.

    Undergraduate and graduate credit in minor field
    THTRE 560. Advanced Stage Movement. (3) Study in the physical development of character and advanced techniques of stage movement. May be repeated for a total of 9 hours credit by qualified students.

    THTRE 561. Vocal Expression for Actors. (3) Studies and application of vocal techniques for stage productions; emphasis on development of the actor's vocal mechanism. May be repeated for a total of 9 hours credit by qualified students. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 562. Playwriting. (3) Theoretical study and practical application of techniques of playwriting with regard to plot, characters, and production; emphasis on the one-act form.

    THTRE 563. Storytelling. (2) A consideration of literary materials appropriate for children in nursery schools, kindergarten, and elementary schools. Major emphasis is on training in the art of storytelling. Pr.: SPCH 105 or 106.

    THTRE 565. Principles of Directing. (3) Principles, processes and techniques of directing for the theatre. Pr.: THTRE 261.

    THTRE 566. Rehearsal Techniques. (0-3) I, II. A laboratory course for students enrolled in performance and production classes. May be repeated for 6 hours. Pr.: Conc. enrollment in THTRE 765 or 783 or 779.

    THTRE 568. Fundamentals of Scene Design. (3) Examination of the role of scene design in theatre, principles and techniques of design. Development, presentation, and synthesis of design images with the scripted play. Pr.: THTRE 368 and THTRE 369.

    THTRE 569. Advanced Technical Production. (3) A lecture-lab course in advanced technical theatre problems of organization, planning, drafting and execution of scenery and lighting. Pr.: THTRE 368.

    THTRE 570. The Musical Comedy. (3) On sufficient demand. The history of operetta and musical comedy from Offenbach to the present. Same as MUSIC 570. Pr.: MUSIC 150 or THTRE 165 or equiv.

    THTRE 572. History of Theatre I. (3) II. A survey of the development of the theatre from ancient times to 1700. Pr.: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

    THTRE 573. History of Theatre II. (3) I. A survey of the development of the theatre from 1700 to the present. Pr.: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

    THTRE 580. Music Theatre Workshop. (2) II. Principles and techniques of musical theatre production with emphasis on rehearsal and performance of selected scenes from musical theatre. Dance, music, and theatre are studied as integrated elements within the musical theatre genre. Culminates in a public performance. Course may be repeated twice for credit. Pr.: MUSIC 202, two semesters of voice; THTRE 261; and DANCE 380; or consent of instructor.

    THTRE 630. Topics in Theatre. (1-4) Selected topics in theatre. May be repeated with topic change to a maximum of 12 hours credit.

    THTRE 632. Costume Design. (3) Studies in theory and practices of costume design for stage and film. Pr.: THTRE 267.

    THTRE 660. Professional Theatre Tour. (2-3) Intersession, S. Supervised viewing and analysis of professional theatre productions. Travel to one or more theatre centers such as New York, London, or Los Angeles. Students are charged an additional fee to cover travel expenses. Written critical reviews of the productions are required. May be repeated once by undergraduates. Pr.: Six hours of credit in theatre.

    THTRE 661. Professional Development. (1) I. Study of audition techniques including supervised preparation of appropriate material. Business aspects of professional theatre, including unions, contracts, and professional ethics. Pr.: 12 hours in theatre, music, and/or dance.

    THTRE 664. Creative Dramatics. (3) The development of creative imagination and personal well-being through theatre games, improvisation, role playing, and simulation. The use of drama in recreational and educational settings. Improvisation in performing scripted drama. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 665. Drama Therapy with Special Populations. (3) The therapeutic uses of drama in the development of creative imagination, self expression, and social relatedness with special populations such as the mentally disabled, the emotionally disturbed, and the senior adult. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 666. Stage Management. (3) I, II. Theory and practice of stage management in the professional and nonprofessional theatre. Emphasis is on the organization of all areas of theatre knowledge needed for the running of theatrical productions. Pr.: THTRE 368.

    THTRE 667. Period Styles for the Theatre I. (3) II. Survey of historical styles of architecture, furnishings, and clothing in relation to theatrical design and the history of the theatre from the Greeks to 1800. Pr.: THTRE 572 or conc. enrollment.

    THTRE 668. Period Styles for the Theatre 2. (3) I. Survey of historical styles of architecture, furnishings, and clothing in relation to theatrical design and the history of the theatre from 1800 to present. Pr.: THTRE 573 or conc. enrollment.

    THTRE 671. History of Opera. (3) A study of selected masterpieces of musical drama, with emphasis on the relationship of music and drama, and on the unique qualities of opera as a collective artwork. Pr.: MUSIC 201 or MUSIC 250 or THTRE 370. Same as MUSIC 650.

    University General Education courseTHTRE 672. American Ethnic Theatre. (3) Drama and stagecraft of ethnic groups in the United States, including the theatre of African, Asian, Hispanic, Jewish, and Native Americans. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 673. Theatre for Conflict Resolution. (3) S, Intersession. Drama and theatre techniques used to explore the nature of conflict and how to promote collaboration through action. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 674. Drama Therapy with Adolescents. (3) S, Intersession. The therapeutic uses of drama with adolescents, including normal development, youth-at-risk, ESL, SED, and BD adolescents. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 675. Drama Therapy with Older Adults. (1-3) S, Intersession. The therapeutic uses of drama with older adults, focusing on the development of life review, social relatedness, and creative self-expression in the here and now. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 710. Practicum in Theatre. (0-6) Supervised participation in a position of major responsibility. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours credit. Pr.: THTRE 160 or 261 or 368; junior standing; consent of supervising faculty member and approval of faculty members are required.

    THTRE 711. Topics in Technical Theatre. (3) Selected topics in creative techniques and investigation for technical theatre. May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Pr.: THTRE 368 and consent of instructor.

    THTRE 712. Theatre Management. (3) Theatre management, promotion, finance, organization; emphasis on contract negotiations and use of facilities.

    THTRE 760. Principles of Drama Therapy. (3) Study of theory and practice in the use of drama as therapy, including assessment and treatment, individual and group practice, and psychodrama. Pr.: THTRE 664 or 665.

    THTRE 761. Advanced Acting. (3) Studies in style, technique, and characterization. May be repeated once. Pr.: THTRE 361 and consent of instructor.

    THTRE 762. Advanced Playwriting. (3) Further study in the writing of drama; emphasis on problems of writing full-length plays. May be repeated for a total of 9 hours credit by qualified students. Cross-listed as ENGL 762. Pr.: THTRE 562.

    THTRE 763. Reader's Theatre. (3) The nature, purpose, and production of oral interpretation of literature in the theatre; emphasis on monologue, lecture-recital, and play reading. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit by qualified students. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 764. Early American Theatre. (3) Studies in the drama and stagecraft of the colonies and the United States from the beginnings to 1900. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 765. Practice in Directing. (3) A lecture-lab course with emphasis on directing dramatic productions under performance conditions. May be repeated for a total of 9 hours credit by qualified students. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 770. Creative Arts Therapies. (3) I. Survey of five creative arts therapy modalities: drama/psychodrama, art, poetry/bibliotherapy, music, and dance/movement. Instruction in theory and hands-on experience with each modality, as well as reading, discussion, and methods for using the modalities interdisciplinarily.

    THTRE 777. Aesthetics of the Theatre. (3) Principal emphasis on theoretical problems of dramatic art.

    THTRE 779. Repertory Theatre. (3) Concentrated studies in theory and practice of repertory theatre productions. Reading, demonstrations, study of play scripts; play selection and production methods; operation of and assistance in production of plays in repertory. May be repeated for a total of 12 hours credit by qualified students. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 780. Theatre Design Studio. (0-3) I, II. Advanced problems in conceptualization and realization of design, including sets, costumes, lights, and technical production. Emphasis on advanced techniques in research, analysis, and production problems. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Pr.: THTRE 567, 568, 569, or 579.

    THTRE 782. Women in Theatre. (3) A history of the contributions made by women in theatre as playwrights, managers, directors, and performers; contemporary women in theatre and their experiments in expressing women's consciousness.

    THTRE 783. Practice in Acting. (3) Advanced studies in characterization with emphasis on communicating with the director. Taught in conjunction with the Practice in Directing workshop. May be repeated once. Pr.: THTRE 361 and consent of instructor.

    THTRE 784. Psychodrama. (3) S. Theory and practice of psychodrama as a treatment modality for use in drama therapy. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 785. Sociodrama. (3) S. Theory and practice of sociodrama as a therapeutic and educational modality for use in drama therapy and developmental drama. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    THTRE 786. Israeli Theatre. (3) Drama and stagecraft of Israeli Theatre from its origins through the present. Pr.: Junior standing.

    THTRE 799. Projects in Theatre. (1-4) Individual guided work in selected area. Only 3 hours may be applied to MA.

    Dance courses
    DANCE 120. Modern Dance I. (2) I, II. Introduction to principles of modern dance. Emphasis on correct body alignment, movement efficiency, and creative potential of the individual. Three hours lab a week.

    DANCE 165. Ballet I. (2) I, II. Introduction to basics of classical ballet training. Includes terminology, body positions, movement vocabulary, and principles of body alignment.

    DANCE 171. Jazz Dance I. (2) I, II. A basic course in jazz technique and style, focusing on isolations, rhythmic articulation, and the control and release of energy. Three hours lab a week.

    DANCE 195. Improvisational Structures. (2) Exploration of personal creative sources for spontaneous movement through improvisational structures. Emphasis on solo and group problem-solving in creating a performance work.

    DANCE 200. Anatomy for Dancers. (1) On sufficient demand. Analysis of human skeletal structure. Application and implication for performance, teaching, and injury prevention.

    DANCE 205. Dance as an Art Form. (3) I. Dance in its religious, social, and artistic forms. Film, slides, demonstrations, and lectures will trace the function of dance in society, the influence of society on dance, how dance relates to other art forms, and current trends in the dance world.

    DANCE 225. Rhythmic Notation for Dance. (1) On sufficient demand. Introduction to basic elements of meter, tempo, rhythm, and notation. Application and practice to dance pedagogy, performance, and choreography.

    DANCE 250. Performance Styles. (1) Study and practice of technique and performance of specific period/historical, character, or ethnic/specialty dance styles. May be repeated three times.

    DANCE 295. Dance Composition I. (3) On sufficient demand. Introduction to the principles of the choreographic craft. Practical experience in development of movement phrases. Culminating presentation and critique of work. Pr.: DANCE 195

    DANCE 321. Variations and Partnering. (1) On sufficient demand. Directed study in the principles of partnering and repertoire performance in various styles and forms of choreography. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    DANCE 323. Modern Dance II. (2) I, II. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of these hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 120 and consent of instructor.

    DANCE 324. Modern Dance III. (2) I, II. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of these hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 323 and consent of instructor.

    DANCE 325. Ballet II. (2) I, II. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of these hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 165 and consent of instructor.

    DANCE 326. Ballet III. (2) I, II. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of these hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 325 and consent of instructor.

    DANCE 371. Jazz Dance II. (2) I, II. Intermediate course in jazz technique and style focusing on development of isolations, rhythmic articulation, and the control and release of energy. Performance of advanced movement sequences. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of these hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 171.

    DANCE 372. Jazz Dance III. (2) On sufficient demand. May be repeated for a total of 8 hours. Only 2 of the hours may be applied toward humanities requirements. Pr.: DANCE 371 or consent of instructor.

    DANCE 380. Musical Stage Dance. (2) On sufficient demand. Technique and performance of musical stage dance. Rehearsal and performance of selected musical stage choreography. Pr.: DANCE 120, 165, or 171.

    DANCE 399. Honors Seminar. (3) Open only to qualified students in the arts and sciences honors program.

    DANCE 405. Applied Movement Fundamentals. (3) Study, analysis, and application of movement theory to dance training, education, creation, and performance. Scientific and somatic principles are emphasized in the art form and body therapies. Pr.: DANCE 200.

    DANCE 420. Dance Theatre Lab. (0) I, II. Practice in technique, improvisation, and choreographic process. Study of technical training to enhance cognitive, perceptual, and application skills in dance. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    DANCE 455. Movement Exploration and Creative Dance for Children. (3) I. Application of scientific principles to the teaching of basic movement concepts and creative dance for grades K-6. Emphasis upon a guided discovery and problem-solving approach. One hour lec. and four hours lab a week. Pr.: KIN 320, 330, and 335 (or any two and conc. enrollment in the third).

    DANCE 459. History of Dance in Its Cultural Setting. (3) II. The study of developments and changes in the style, technique, and purpose of ceremonial and theatrical dancing from the Greeks to the present. Emphasis on the interaction between this art and the total culture—social, religious, artistic, and political—in which it is performed. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

    DANCE 495. Dance Composition II. (3) On sufficient demand. Advanced training and directed experiences in dance composition. Development of theme, phrasing, and style with particular emphasis on group forms. Pr.: DANCE 295.

    DANCE 498. Honors Tutorial in Dance. (1-3) I, II. Individually directed research/creative endeavor in dance, normally as a preliminary to writing a senior honors thesis. May be repeated once to a total of 3 hours. Pr.: Sophomore standing, membership in the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences, and permission of instructor.

    DANCE 499. Senior Honors Thesis. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

    DANCE 502 Performance Production. (1-2) I, II. Studies in the techniques of dance production and performance. Emphasis is on practical application. May be repeated four times. Pr.: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

    DANCE 504. Performance Aesthetics. (3) On sufficient demand. Examination of performance as art. Analysis of general aesthetic theory to performance through such issues as style, content, form, gender, and role. Oral and written experience in planning, executing, and assessing performance events. Pr.: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

    DANCE 505. Methods and Materials of Teaching Dance. (2) On sufficient demand. An in-depth survey of the development of dance education and a practical examination of dance for its educative, artistic, disciplinary, and therapeutic values. Emphasis on role of dance education, pedagogy, and advocacy. Pr.: DANCE 205, 405, and 504 or consent of instructor.

    DANCE 506. Dance Education Fieldwork. (1) On sufficient demand. A semester of supervised fieldwork incorporating dance as an educative tool in the classroom, in a therapeutic setting, or in an advocacy position. Application of dance education theory under faculty supervision and conference. Pr.: DANCE 505.

    DANCE 510. Senior Project. (1) Student creates and presents major performance, choreographic or written project demonstrating advanced level of achievement. Pr.: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

    DANCE 520. Principles of Dance Technology. (3) On sufficient demand. Examination and application of video and computer technology to dance. Includes instruction and use in performance, choreography, education and research. Emphasis on conceptual framework. Pr.: Senior standing.

    DANCE 599. Independent Studies in Dance. (1-3) Selected topics in dance. Maximum of 3 hours applicable toward degree. Pr.: Consent of department head.

    Topics within Arts and Sciences:
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    dDegree Requirements dAerospace Studies dMathematics
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences dAnthropology dMilitary Science
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    dBachelor of Music Education dBiology dPhilosophy
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    dDean of Arts and Sciences Courses dEnglish dPsychology
    dProgram Options dGeography dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dAdvising dGeology dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies dHistory dStatistics
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    Kansas State University
    June 5, 2003