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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2004
    About the Catalog
    About the University
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    Academic Advising
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    Tuition and Fees
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    dMajors and Degrees
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    University Faculty
     

    Chemistry

    Peter M.A. Sherwood, Head

    University Distinguished Professors Klabunde and Sherwood; Professors Hammaker, Hawley, Hua, A. Kelley, D. Kelley, Maatta, and Ortiz; Associate Professors Aakeröy, Buszek, Collinson, Higgins, Hollingsworth, and Warmuth; Assistant Professors Baures, Culbertson, Lenhert, and Levy; Instructors Paukstelis and E. Dikeman; Emeriti: University Distinguished Professor Fateley and Setser; Professors Copeland, Kruh, McDonald, Meloan, and Moser; Instructor Weyerts.

    www.ksu.edu/chem

    The Department of Chemistry occupies modern laboratory facilities in the Chemistry/ Biochemistry Building, the H.H. King Chemical Laboratory and part of Willard Hall. The faculty represents a broad range of interest in the discipline of chemistry. The department offers programs leading to the B.S. and B.A. degrees in chemistry and chemical science. In addition to the undergraduate program, the department offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees; the graduate program includes approximately 40 students.

    The discipline of chemistry is very broad and a training in chemistry provides many different career possibilities. For example, research chemists explore and synthesize new compounds and materials and they invent and characterize new processes. Development chemists translate research findings into products, and they work in areas such as marketing, economics, management, and safety. Chemists are involved in solving chemical problems that range from analysis of environmental aspects of chemicals to the manufacture of chemicals and finished products. Chemists also work in federal- or state- sponsored research activities (trade, foods, roads, fire research, nuclear energy) and environmental protection (water, waste, and drugs), and a variety of educational and teaching activities.

    Students often use chemistry degrees as preparation for advanced study in medicine, pharmacy, and other health science areas. Students who plan to become high school science teachers may choose to earn dual degrees in chemistry and education. Numerous other possibilities, such as biochemistry or chemical engineering, exist for dual degrees. For dual degree programs, the requirements of both curricula must be met.

    High school preparation
    High school students who plan to major in chemistry must have a good background in mathematics and science. Trigonometry and two years of algebra are essential, as are courses in chemistry and physics.

    Transfer students
    Community college students are encouraged to take a year of general chemistry and a course in quantitative analysis, two to three semesters of calculus, English composition, and speech classes for transfer credit.

    Independent study and research
    Many chemistry students are engaged in independent study and research, some as early as their first year. Two credit hours of research experience, under the supervision of a faculty member of the student's choice, are required for the B.S. degree in chemistry. A formal, written report describing the research is also required.

    General requirements for undergraduate major
    Students majoring in chemistry or chemical science must earn grades of C or better in all courses prescribed for these curricula, as outlined below. A total of 120 credit hours are required for graduation. The B.A. program is obtained by following the curriculum for the B.S. degrees with the additional foreign language requirement of the College of Arts and Science.

    Chemistry curriculum for the B.S. degree
    The preferred curriculum for students preparing for employment as chemists or for graduate study in chemistry is listed below. This curriculum is approved by the American Chemical Society: chemistry option (40-42 hours) ; biochemistry option (45- 47 hours)à.

    CHM 220Chemical Principles I5
    and
    CHM 250Chemical Principles II5
    or
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    and
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    and
    CHM 371Chemical Analysis4
    CHM 531Organic Chemistry I3
    CHM 532Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
    CHM 550Organic Chemistry II3
    CHM 585Physical Chemistry I3
    CHM 595Physical Chemistry II3
    CHM 598Physical Chemistry II Laboratory2
    CHM 566Instrumental Methods of Analysis3
    CHM 567Instrumental Methods of Analysis Laboratory1
    CHM 657Inorganic Techniques2
    CHM 711Inorganic Chemistry I3
    CHM 712Inorganic Chemistry II3
    CHM 599Senior Thesis Research2
     
    Mathematics (12 hours)
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
    MATH 222Analytic Geometry and Calculus III4
     
    Physics (10 hours)
    PHYS 213Engineering Physics I5
    PHYS 214Engineering Physics II5
     
      Either CHM 711 or 712 may be replaced with CHM 752 (Advanced Organic Chemistry, 3 credits).
    à For the biochemistry option, either CHM 711 or 712 may be replaced with BIOCH 755, 756, and 765 (Biochemistry I, Biochemistry I Lab, and Biochemistry II, 8 credits). CHM 657 may be taken for 1 or 2 hours under this option.
     
    Chemical science curriculum for the B.S. degree
    The chemical science curriculum serves students who want a strong background in science but not as much specialization in chemistry as provided by the B.S. degree in chemistry.

    Chemistry (23-25 hours)
    CHM 220Chemical Principles I5
    and
    CHM 250Chemical Principles II5
    or
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    and
    CHM 230Chemistry II4
    and
    CHM 371Chemical Analysis4
    CHM 531Organic Chemistry I3
    CHM 532Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
    CHM 550Organic Chemistry II3
    CHM 500General Physical Chemistry3
    or
    CHM 585Physical Chemistry I3
    CHM 545Chemical Separations2*
     
    Biochemistry (5 hours)
    BIOCH 521General Biochemistry3
    BIOCH 522General Biochemistry Laboratory2
     
    Mathematics (8 hours)
    MATH 220Analytic Geometry and Calculus I4
    MATH 221Analytic Geometry and Calculus II4
     
    Physics (8 hours)
    PHYS 113General Physics I4
    PHYS 114General Physics II4
     
    *CHM 545 may be replaced with either: CHM 566 and CHM 567; or CHM 595 and either CHM 586 or CHM 596.
     
    Chemistry minor
    CHM 220Chemical Principles I5
    and
    CHM 250Chemical Principles II5
    or
    CHM 210Chemistry I4
    and
    CHM 250Chemistry II4
    and
    CHM 371Chemical Analysis4
    CHM 350General Organic Chemistryà3
    CHM 351General Organic Chemistry Lab§2
    CHM 500General Physical Chemistry#3
    18 or 20
     
    àCHM 531 (Organic Chemistry I, 3 credits) may be substituted for CHM 350.
    §CHM 532 (Organic Chemistry Lab, 2 credits) may be substituted for CHM 351.
    #CHM 585 (Physical Chemistry I, 3 credits) may be substituted for CHM 500.
     
    Introductory and general chemistry courses
    University General Education courseCHM 110. General Chemistry. (3) I, II, S. Principles, laws, and theories of chemistry; important metallic and nonmetallic substances. (An optional laboratory course, CHM 111, is available for an additional hour of credit). Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: MATH 010 or at least one year of high school algebra.

    University General Education courseCHM 111. General Chemistry Laboratory. (1) I, II, S. A laboratory course to supplement the material of CHM 110. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 110 or conc. enrollment.

    CHM 195. Approved Techniques in Criminalistics. (3) Intersession only. Physical evidence at a crime scene and its examination in the laboratory. Soils, glass, hair fibers, drugs, explosives, poisons, castings, inks, and arson and rape situations are investigated.

    CHM 200. Undergraduate Seminar in Chemistry. (0,1) I, II. Programs and activities of interest to students in chemistry, including lectures given by chemistry majors.

    University General Education courseCHM 210. Chemistry I.* (4) I, II, S. First course of a two-semester study of the principles of chemistry and the properties of the elements and their compounds. Three hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: One year of high school chemistry and MATH 100 (or two years of high school algebra).

    CHM 211. Chemistry I Recitation. (1) I, II. An optional recitation class that requires conc. enrollment in CHM 210 Chemistry I. The objective is the development of skills for solving chemical problems. Instruction will be via a small class format. For credit/no credit only. Credit independent of grade for Chemistry I.

    Students entering the university with Advanced Placement chemistry examination credit may earn the following grades:
    Score Grade
    5 A in Chemistry I and
    A in Chemistry II
    4 A in Chemistry I and
    B in Chemistry II
    3 B in Chemistry I

    Students may also earn 4 hours of credit with grade for CHM 210 by taking a comprehensive examination given by the instructor during the first week of the semester.

    University General Education courseCHM 215. Environmental Science: A Chemistry Perspective. (3) I. An analysis of important technological developments and their impact on society and on the earth's environment; ethical issues raised by technological advances. History, matter and energy, ecosystems, population issues, air pollution, water pollution, hazardous substances, environmental policies, and decision making are discussed. Pr.: CHM 110 or CHM 210.

    University General Education courseCHM 220. Chemical Principles I. (5) I. First course of a two-semester study of chemical principles. For students in curricula with a major emphasis in chemistry. Four hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: High school chemistry (one year) and algebra (one and one-half years).

    University General Education courseCHM 230. Chemistry II. (4) I, II, S. Second course of a two-semester study of the principles of chemistry and the properties of the elements and their compounds. Three hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 210.

    CHM 231. Chemistry II Recitation. (1) I, II. An optional recitation class that requires conc. enrollment in CHM 230 Chemistry II. The objective is the development of skills for solving chemical problems. Instruction will be via a small class format. For credit/no credit only. Credit independent of grade for Chemistry II.

    University General Education courseCHM 250. Chemical Principles II. (5) II. Continuation of CHM 220, covering the principles of chemistry. Laboratory has emphasis on quantitative chemical analysis. Three hours lec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 220.

    University General Education courseCHM 399. Honors Seminar. (3) Open to students in the arts and sciences honors program.

    CHM 497. Research in Undergraduate Chemistry. (1-3) I, II, S. Undergraduate research in the chemical sciences. Pr.: Consent of instructor

    CHM 498. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) I, II, S. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

    CHM 499. Problems in Undergraduate Chemistry. (Var.) I, II, S. Problems may include classroom and/or lab work. Pr.: Consent of instructor. May be repeated.

    CHM 599. Senior Thesis Research. (1-3) I, II, S. Analytical, inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry. A final written report is required. Pr.: CHM 585 and consent of instructor.

    600 or above courses
    Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses numbered 600 and above require the following minimum prerequisites: CHM 550; CHM 532; CHM 595; and CHM 598.

    CHM 600. Scientific Glassblowing. (1) II. The basic techniques of bending, sealing, and blowing glass used to fabricate scientific glassware. Three hours of lab including one lec. demonstration a week. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing in physical sciences.

    CHM 601. Safe Chemical Laboratory Practices. (1) I. A general safety course for persons working or teaching in a chemical laboratory. One hour of lec. per week. Pr.: CHM 371 and 350 or equiv.

    CHM 700. Practicum in Teaching Chemistry. (1) I. Principles and methods of instruction in laboratories and recitation classes in chemistry, including one semester of supervised experience as an instructor in a chemical laboratory. This is a required course of all graduate teaching assistants in the Department of Chemistry. May be taken only once for credit. Pr.: Senior standing in chemistry.

    CHM 799. Problems in Chemistry. (Var.) I, II, S. Problems may include classroom or laboratory work. Not for thesis research. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    Analytical chemistry courses
    CHM 371. Chemical Analysis. (4) I. Principles of chemical equilibria and quantitative analysis: gravimetric, titrimetric, spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, and separations methods. Two hours lec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 230.

    CHM 545. Chemical Separations. (2) II. Principles of modern separation techniques. One hour lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 250 or 371, CHM 532 and 550.

    CHM 566. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. (3) I. Introduction to theory and practice of electrochemical methods, molecular and atomic spectroscopy, surface science, mass spectrometry, separation methods, and electronics in analytical chemistry. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550 and CHM 500 or CHM 585.

    CHM 567. Instrumental Methods of Analysis Laboratory. (1) I. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 566 or conc. enrollment.

    Inorganic chemistry courses
    University General Education courseCHM 650. History of Chemistry. (2) II, in even years. Traces the beginnings of chemistry from 3500 B.C. to 1920 A.D. Early metallurgy, Greek thought about atoms, alchemy, atomic theory, discovery of gases, definition of elements, chemical bonds, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. Pr.: CHM 585.

    CHM 657. Inorganic Techniques. (1-2) II. The preparation, characterization, and study of transition metal, main group, and organometallic compounds using techniques commonly encountered in industrial and academic research. Three to six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 585.

    CHM 711. Inorganic Chemistry I. (3) I. Atomic and molecular structure, bonding concepts used in the practice of inorganic chemistry. Applications of symmetry and group theory to structure, bonding, and spectra. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550, 595.

    CHM 712. Inorganic Chemistry II. (3) II. Structure, reactivity, and mechanistic aspects of main group and transition metal complexes. Organometallic reactions, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550, 595.

    Organic chemistry courses
    University General Education courseCHM 350. General Organic Chemistry. (3) I, II, S. A survey of types of organic reactions important to biological science, including pre-veterinary and certain agriculture and human ecology programs. Conc. enrollment in CHM 351 is urged. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 230.

    University General Education courseCHM 351. General Organic Chemistry Laboratory. (2) I, II, S. One five-hour lab and one hour of lec. a week. Pr. or conc. enrollment: CHM 350.

    CHM 531. Organic Chemistry I. (3) I, II. General principles of organic chemistry; study of the main types of aliphatic compounds, with an introduction to fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, and aromatic compounds. Required for chemistry curricula and for entrance to medical schools. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 230 or 250.

    CHM 532. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. (2) I, II. One five-hour lab and one hour of lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550 or conc. enrollment.

    CHM 550. Organic Chemistry II. (3) I, II. Continuation of CHM 531, including additional aromatic chemistry, condensation reactions, and introduction to advanced topics, such as dyes, polymers, and heterocyclic chemistry. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 531.

    CHM 551. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2) I, II. One five-hour lab and one hour of lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550 and 532.

    CHM 752. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3) I. Advanced study of organic compounds and fundamental types of reactions. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 550 and 595.

    Physical chemistry courses
    CHM 500. General Physical Chemistry. (3) II. Elementary principles of physical chemistry. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 350 or CHM 531 and MATH 211 or MATH 221, and PHYS 114 or equivalent.

    CHM 585. Physical Chemistry I. (3) I. Elementary chemical thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 250 or CHM 371, MATH 222, PHYS 214, and CHM 531.

    CHM 586. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory. (2) I. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 250 or CHM 371, CHM 585 or conc. enrollment.

    CHM 595. Physical Chemistry II. (3) II. Elementary quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 585.

    CHM 598. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. (2) II. Six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 250 or CHM 371 and CHM 595 or conc. enrollment.

    Topics within Arts and Sciences:
    dMajors and Degrees dPre-Health Professions Program dKinesiology
    dDegree Requirements dAerospace Studies dMathematics
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences dAnthropology dMilitary Science
    dBachelor of Fine Arts dArt dModern Languages
    dBachelor of Music dBiochemistry dMusic
    dBachelor of Music Education dBiology dPhilosophy
    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley dChemistry dPhysics
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley dEconomics dPolitical Science
    dDean of Arts and Sciences Courses dEnglish dPsychology
    dProgram Options dGeography dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dAdvising dGeology dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies dHistory dStatistics
    dPre-Law dJournalism and Mass Communications   
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    Kansas State University
    June 5, 2003