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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2002
     

    About the Catalog
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    dMajors and Degrees
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    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences
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    dBachelor of Music Education
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    Music

    Paul Hunt,* Head

    Professors A. Cochran,* R. Edwards,* Flouer,* Fallin,* Hunt,* Jackson,* Littrell,* Sloop,* Sutton,* and Walker;* Associate Professors Cooper,* J. Edwards,* Gartner, Houser,* Mortenson,* Parker,* Polich, Royse,* and Tracz;* Assistant Professors M.L. Cochran, Ganz, Goins,* T. Kerstetter,* and Pittman;* Instructors J. Kerstetter, Gbur, and Wingfield; Adjunct Betton; Emeriti: Professors Brookhart,* Funkhouser,* Langenkamp,* Steinbauer,* W. Walker,* and White;* Associate Professor Sidorfsky; Assistant Professors Caine* and M. Walker.

    E-mail: musicd@ksu.edu
    www.ksu.edu/musicd

    The Department of Music is a member, with institutional accreditation, of the National Association of Schools of Music.

    Curricula in music education and performance with majors in music theatre, composition, voice, piano, organ, strings, woodwind, percussion, and brass instruments are offered. Courses in music are available to any student enrolled in the university, subject to prerequisites listed in the course descriptions. Courses in performance do not require prerequisites for those not majoring in music; however, availability of instructor and fees for nonmajors are factors in securing performance instruction. This elective credit cannot be used later toward a music degree unless it meets the requirements of that course as they apply to those majoring in music. No more than two credits a semester will be granted for performance as an elective.

    Entrance requirements
    New and transfer students
    Preliminary placement examinations in piano, the performance major, and theory must be taken by all students majoring in music regardless of the curriculum selected. Students will be advised as to the most appropriate field of concentration and the proper level of study as a result of examination.

    Divisional hearings will determine the number of upper-level hours that will be accepted for transfer students.

    Students who, on the basis of auditions in their major performance area, have been determined by the faculty to perform at a level lower than that acceptable for MUSIC 255 will not be allowed to declare a major in music. They will be required to enroll in MUSIC 251 Pre-Applied Study until such time that their proficiency level is acceptable for MUSIC 255.

    If, on the basis of audition, a music major is determined by the faculty to lack sufficient proficiency to be a member of a major performing ensemble that student must enroll in Voice Class. A maximum of two semesters of Voice Class may be substituted for the major ensemble requirements.

    Music minor

    MUSIC 201Styles II, Textures 4
    MUSIC 202Styles, III, Classical 4
    MUSIC 255L-D Perf 4
    Major performing ensemble 4
    (MUSIC 111, 115, 116, 117, 130, 135, 140, 400,
    401, 402, 403, 404, 408, 409, 411)
    Guided electives* 3-4
     
    *Guided electives:
    MUSIC 213Styles, IV, Romantic
    or
    Any music history course or literature course above 300 for which MUSIC 201 or 250 is a prerequisite.
    or
    ANTH 515, 516, 517
     
    Bachelor of arts
    120 hours required for graduation

    The bachelor of arts with a major in music emphasizes the liberal arts tradition. The program provides enough flexibility in electives for students to meet other preprofessional requirements, and it thus may appeal to students whose professional goals do not terminate with music. The minimum requirement in music is 48 hours, including the following:

    MUSIC 201Styles II, Textures of Music 4
    MUSIC 202Styles III, The Classical Period 4
    MUSIC 213Styles IV, The Romantic Period 4
    MUSIC 218Aural Skills Proficiency 0
    MUSIC 398Musical Style of the Baroque 4
    MUSIC 406Musical Style to 1600 (Medieval and
    Renaissance) 4
    MUSIC 407Musical Style of the Twentieth
    Century 4
     
    Recital attendance is required for seven semesters (transfer students' records will be evaluated). The major program of music leading to the degree bachelor of arts may be elected with an emphasis in the areas of music literature, composition, or performance.

    The music literature area requires 8 hours of electives in music history and music literature. In addition, 8 semester hours in a single performance area are required, of which half must be from the 400 level.

    The composition area calls for MUSIC 521 (three hours), 615, 616, 714, 3 semester hours in music literature, and 8 semester hours of piano, of which half must be from the 400 level.

    The performance area calls for MUSIC 615 and 616 plus 16 hours of an instrument or voice, of which half must be from the 400 level.

    Participation in a music organization (instrumental or choral, depending on the major performance area) is required each semester, and the piano proficiency requirement must be passed before graduation.

    Bachelor of music
    129-134 hours required for graduation

    A four-year program is offered with concentrations in piano, organ, voice, strings, wind or percussion instruments, music theatre, and composition.

    The general education requirements for this degree are listed in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog.

    The basic requirements for all options are:

    Basic requirements

    MUSIC 201Styles II, Textures of Music 4
    MUSIC 202Styles III, The Classical Period 4
    MUSIC 213Styles IV, The Romantic Period 4
    MUSIC 218Aural Skills Proficiency 0
    MUSIC 398Musical Styles of the Baroque Period 4
    MUSIC 406Musical Styles to 1600 (Medieval and
    Renaissance) 4
    MUSIC 407Musical Styles of the Twentieth
    Century 4
    MUSIC 473Seminar in Comprehensive
    Musicianship 2
    MUSIC 417Conducting 2
    Music elective 2
    Junior recital 0
    Senior recital 0
    MUSIC 050Recital Attendance (7 semesters) 0
    MUSIC 060Piano Proficiency 0
     
    Additional requirements for music theatre option
    MUSIC 255Voice  8
    MUSIC 455Voice 11
    MUSIC 285Italian Diction  1
    MUSIC 287German Diction  1
    or
    MUSIC 465French Diction  1
    Major performing organization  4
    MUSIC 475Opera Workshop  4
    MUSIC 492Methods and Materials for the Studio
    or
    MUSIC 706Song Literature  2-3
    MUSIC 650History of Opera  3
    MUSIC 206Piano Class I  1
    and
    MUSIC 207Piano Class II  1
    Music electives  2
    THTRE 260Stage Movement  3
    THTRE 261Fundamentals of Acting  3
    THTRE 268Techniques of Makeup  1
    THTRE 361Intermediate Acting  3
    THTRE 368Fundamentals of Technical Productions  3
    THTRE 211Drama Participation  1
    THTRE 761Advanced Acting  3
    Theatre electives selected from the following  3
    THTRE 161Fundamentals of Improvisation
    or
    THTRE 560Advanced Stage Movement
    or
    THTRE 664Creative Dramatics
    DANCE 165Ballet I  2
    DANCE 120Modern Dance  2
    or
    DANCE 171Jazz Dance
    Dance electives  2
    Secondary modern language  4
     
    Additional requirements for vocal performance
    MUSIC 255Voice  8
    MUSIC 455Voice 14
    Piano Class or Piano  4
    MUSIC 474Problems in Musical Style and Music
    Pedagogy  2
    MUSIC 615Canon and Fugue  2
    MUSIC 616Twentieth Century Counterpoint  2
    MUSIC 492Methods and Materials of the Studio  2
    Major performing organization each semester
    Diction  4
    Vocal ensemble or Opera Theatre  4
    Additional music electives  3
    Primary modern language (1 additional course)  4
    Secondary modern language (1 course)  4
     
    Additional requirements for instrumental performance
    (keyboard, strings, wind, and percussion instruments):
    Major performing organization each semester
    Instrumental ensemble  4
    Secondary performance area  4
    MUSIC 474Problems in Musical Style and Music
    Pedagogy  2
    MUSIC 714Advanced Orchestration  2
    MUSIC 615Canon and Fugue  2
    MUSIC 616Twentieth Century Counterpoint  2
    Additional music electives  3
    Additional non-music electives  10
     
    Additional requirements for composition
    MUSIC 255
      and/or 455Major Instrument  8
    Piano (or minor instrument if keyboard is the major instrument)  4
    MUSIC 474Problems in Musical Style and Music
    Pedagogy  2
    MUSIC 714Advanced Orchestration  2
    MUSIC 521Composition 12
    MUSIC 615Canon and Fugue  2
    MUSIC 616Twentieth Century Counterpoint  2
    MUSIC 631Technology of the Electronic Music
    Studio  2
    MUSIC 632Digital Sound Synthesis  2
    Major performing organization each semester
    Additional music electives  7
    Additional non-music electives 10
     
    Bachelor of music education
    136-139 hours required for graduation, depending on emphasis

    The program of study leading to this degree is a nine-semester curriculum designed to prepare music teachers for grades K-12. With careful planning and enrollment during summer session(s) all requirements may be completed in four years. Within this curriculum there are two emphases—vocal/choral music, and instrumental music.

    Professional educational requirements
    EDSEC 102
    EDCEP 315, 525
    EDCIP 310, 455
    EDETC 318
    EDSEC 376, 477, 582
    EDSP 323

    For the College of Education certification, the following GPA requirements exist:
    Overall GPA
    Full admission: 2.5 is required in all college work attempted, including transfer and K-State credits.

    A 2.75 grade point average is required on a 35-hour general education core which is specified by each department. Students should consult with their advisors or inquire in 13 Bluemont Hall for specific requirements.

    Music requirements for all options
    Comprehensive musicianship:
    MUSIC 200, 201, 202, 213, 218, 398, 406, 407, 417, and 473
    Music education:
    MUSIC 511, 512, and 670
    Performance:
    MUSIC 060, 501 or 502, and study of the major instrument or voice and enrollment in a major choral or instrumental organization each semester except the professional semester. In addition, at least one semester in a small ensemble is required.

    A half recital or an extended "jury" recital is required before graduation. Divisional recommendation determines the methods of satisfying this requirements.

    Instrumental majors are required to participate in marching band for at least two semesters (preferably during the freshman and sophomore years).  String Music Education majors may elect to substitute a 2 hour special project for the marching band requirement.  The project will be at the discretion of the Division Chair of Music Education in consultation with the string faculty.

    Piano proficiency requirements must be met one semester before scheduling student teaching.

    Additional music requirements for instrumental emphasis
    Performance:
    MUSIC 203, 204, 206, 207, and 9 semester hours chosen according to the major instrument from: MUSIC 232, 233, 234, 235, 427, 428, and 429

    Enrollments in major organizations must include at least two semesters in a choral organization; upon the recommendation of the advisor, one additional semester of individual or class instruction in voice may be substituted.

    Additional requirements for vocal/choral emphasis
    Performance:
    If voice is the major performance area, MUSIC 232, 233, 234, 235, 285, and 287 or 465; 4 hours of keyboard. If keyboard is the major performance area, MUSIC 203, 204, 232, 233, 234, 235, 350 (two semesters), 410, and 450

    Enrollments in major organizations must include at least two semesters in an instrumental organization; upon the recommendation of the advisor, one semester of advanced instrumental techniques classes may be substituted.

    Requirements in general education are stated earlier in the College of Arts and Sciences section.

    General regulations for all performance areas
    As a part of performance requirements, studio and divisional seminars and general student recitals are held regularly. Each student is required to perform at least once a semester either in a studio seminar or in a student recital. All private study for credit will culminate in a jury exam each term.

    Each division faculty maintains the right to advise students to discontinue performance study in that particular curriculum if the students have not demonstrated the necessary degree of progress.

    For specific divisional requirements, each student should request a copy of detailed policies.

    Participation in a major ensemble in the student's major performance area selected with the advice of a departmental advisor is required each semester. Piano and organ majors may elect either instrumental or choral major ensembles to satisfy requirements.

    As an extension of the study of an instrument or voice, attendance at studio and division seminars is required each semester.

    Attendance at a minimum of 15 recitals and concerts is required for seven semesters. This attendance is to be divided among the various performance areas.

    Piano is required as a performance minor for all degrees unless piano is the performance major. If the performance major is piano, then voice, any instrument, or organ may substitute for the performance minor.

    Required recital attendance
    Attendance at a minimum of 15 recitals or concerts per semester for seven semesters is required for graduation. Transfer students' records will be evaluated.

    Proficiencies
    Music majors will enroll in MUSIC 218 Aural Proficiency concurrently with MUSIC 202. Credit for MUSIC 218 is earned by passing the aural proficiency exam. Successful completion of MUSIC 218 is a prerequisite for enrollment in MUSIC 398, MUSIC 406, MUSIC 407, MUSIC 473 and MUSIC 474. (Exception for placement of transfer students.)

    MUSIC 060 Piano Proficiency requirements must be met prior to graduation.

    Fees for private music lessons
    University students enrolled in the bachelor of music, bachelor music education, bachelor of arts in music degrees or who are minoring in music, are exempt from fees for private music lessons and music practice facilities.

    Students not majoring or minoring in one of these music curricula may take private music instruction (pending availability of staff and facilities) by paying fees as listed in the Fees section of this catalog.

    Comprehensive musicianship courses
    The musical styles courses are required of all undergraduate music majors and coordinate the many facets of the student's musical training. The structure of this program removes the traditional division between history and theory and integrates the student's study by stylistic periods, prefaced by a concentrated introduction to musical textures and basic technical skills. Included in each course are lectures in theory and history as well as laboratory work in performance, conducting, keyboard application, aural skills, analysis, and creative writing.

    Styles courses are governed by the philosophy that all musicians need practical skills in performance, composition, and analysis; music students should recognize a coherent link between all facets of musical training (including those requirements outside the styles courses); and all musical studies should, as closely as possible, relate to one's own time.

    MUSIC 200. Styles I, Elements of Music. (3) I, II. The musical language and its relationship between mind and ear. Formation of interval, scale, and chord patterns; basic notational procedures.

    MUSIC 201. Styles II, Textures of Music. (4) I, II. An introduction to musical elements and historical practice with emphasis on texture as a uniting force; stylistic procedures as applied to sound parameters by the major composers. Pr.: MUSIC 200 or tested knowledge of basic music theory.

    MUSIC 202. Styles III, The Classical Period. (4) I, II. History and performance practices of the late eighteenth century. Diatonic chord structures and nonharmonic tones, introduction to modulation. Scoring for the piano; small forms. Pr.: A minimun grade of C in MUSIC 201 or tested knowledge of beginning music theory.

    MUSIC 213. Styles IV, The Romantic Period. (4) I, II. Historical survey of the nineteenth century. Chromatic harmony, modulations, score reading, and large homophonic forms. Composition for piano with voice or solo instrument. Pr.: MUSIC 202.

    MUSIC 218. Aural Skills Proficiency. (0) I, II. Required for graduation of all music majors. Pr.: MUSIC 202 or conc. enrollment.

    MUSIC 398. Musical Styles of the Baroque Period. (4) II. Historical survey from 1600 to 1750; counterpoint with emphasis on invention, canon, and fugue; scoring for strings. Pr.: MUSIC 213 and MUSIC 218.

    MUSIC 406. Musical Styles to 1600 (Medieval and Renaissance). (4) I. Historical survey, modal counterpoint, early notational systems, performance practice, improvisational frameworks, development of instruments and forms. Pr.: MUSIC 213 and MUSIC 218.

    MUSIC 407. Musical Style of the Twentieth Century. (4) I. Modern music; contemporary practice and aesthetics; polytonality, serial techniques, electronic music. Pr.: MUSIC 218 and MUSIC 398.

    MUSIC 473. Seminar in Comprehensive Musicianship. (2) II, S. A study of music technology and computer applications; popular and non-Western styles. Pr.: MUSIC 213 and MUSIC 218. Required for music education and performance majors.

    MUSIC 474. Problems in Musical Style and Music Pedagogy. (2) I, II, S. Individual projects relating to a specific style or pedagogical problem of the performance major or minor. Pr.: MUSIC 213 and MUSIC 218.

    MUSIC 599. Special Studies in Music. (1-3) I, II, S. Pr.: Background of courses needed for studies undertaken.

    Music history, literature, and theory courses
    University General Education courseMUSIC 100. Music Fundamentals. (3) I, II, S. Elementary instruction in the theory of music. Limited to nonmusic majors.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 160. Music Listening Laboratory. (2) I, II, S. A basic introduction to music. Overview of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, and Twentieth Century stylistic periods; elements of music (melody, rhythm, harmony, form, timbre); and instrument recognition. The focus of the class is on developing listening skills and learning to write brief papers using the new language that has been acquired. Performances are provided by university ensembles, faculty artists, and special guests. Limited to nonmusic majors.

    MUSIC 220. Topics in Music. (1-3) Offered on demand. Exploration of the musical dimensions of a particular topic or theme. Topics vary. May be repeated once.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 245. Introduction to American Music. (3) I, II, S. An introduction to the functions of music in American society and the elements of music, including a survey of the development of various types and styles of music in America. For nonmusic majors only.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 250. Introduction to Music. (3) I, II, S. Elements of music as represented in selected masterpieces of the standard concert repertory, designed to heighten the perception and the enjoyment of the listener who has limited musical knowledge. For nonmusic majors only.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 310. History of Musical Instruments. (2) Offered on demand, only in intersessions, through TELENET, or off-campus. The development of musical instruments in each period of Western music. Pr.: MUSIC 160 or 250.

    MUSIC 385. History of the American Popular Song. (2) Offered on sufficient demand. The vigor and musical inventiveness of this unique American art form including the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic aspects of the songs of Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, and others. Pr.: MUSIC 160 or MUSIC 250.

    MUSIC 390. Special Studies in Music. (1-3) I, II, S. Pr.: Background of courses needed for studies undertaken.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 399. Honors Seminar. (3) On sufficient demand. For selected sophomores.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 420. History of Jazz. (3) On sufficient demand. Survey of jazz styles and personalities. For music majors and nonmajors. Pr.: MUSIC 160, 250, or equiv.

    University General Education courseMUSIC 424. Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest. (2-3) Offered on demand, only in intersessions, through TELENET, or off-campus. The history and development of jazz styles in Kansas City and the southwestern United States, emphasizing the influence on styles of other geographic areas. Pr.: MUSIC 160.

    MUSIC 425. Topics in Jazz. (Var.) Offered on sufficient demand. Big bands; jazz pianists and styles; survey of combo jazz styles, etc. Pr.: MUSIC 160.

    MUSIC 470. Songwriting. (3) Offered on sufficient demand. Composition of original small song forms including preparation of lead sheet and vocal score using guitar chord symbols. Pr.: MUSIC 100. For nonmusic majors only.

    MUSIC 498. Honors Tutorial in Music. (1-3) I, II. Individual directed research and study of a topic in music, normally as a preliminary to writing a senior honors thesis. May be repeated once to a total of 3 hours. Pr.: Sophomore standing, membership in the honors program of the College of Arts and Sciences, and permission of the instructor.

    MUSIC 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) I, II, S. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

    MUSIC 570. Musical Comedy. (3) On sufficient demand. The history of operetta and music comedy from Offenbach to the present. Offered jointly by Departments of Music and Speech. Same as THTRE 570.

    MUSIC 601. Western Music before 1750. (2-3) II, alternate S. A survey of the development of Western music from early Greek civilization to 1750. Pr.: MUSIC 398 and 406.

    MUSIC 614. Harmony and Tonal Counterpoint. (1) Recommended for graduate students in music who desire additional work in the harmonic aspects of 18th-century counterpoint. Concurrent enrollment in MUSIC 615 required.

    MUSIC 615. Canon and Fugue. (2) I, S. Counterpoint in eighteenth century style. Pr.: MUSIC 398, consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 616. Twentieth-Century Counterpoint. (2) II, S. Contrapuntal devices used by twentieth-century composers; serial techniques. Pr.: MUSIC 398, consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 620. Music Calligraphy and Score Preparation. (2) Tools and procedures for professional preparation of music manuscript in facsimile editions. Computer applications for typesetting and music publishing. Pr.: MUSIC 201.

    MUSIC 631. Technology of the Electronic Music Studio. (2) I, S. Instrumentation and systematic procedures as applied to the construction of electronic music. Principles of voltage-controlled systems, synchronous tape machines, and audio mixing. Individual and team projects. Pr.: MUSIC 521, consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 632. Digital Sound Synthesis. (2) On sufficient demand. Exploration of real-time interactive systems. Theory and application pertaining to the creation of instruments and scores using additive and FM techniques. Team projects. Pr.: MUSIC 631.

    MUSIC 650. History of the Opera. (3) On sufficient demand. A study of selected masterpieces of musical drama, with emphasis on the relationship of music and drama, and on the unique qualities of opera as a collective artwork. Pr.: MUSIC 201 or 250. Same as THTRE 671.

    MUSIC 702. Style Analysis. (2-3) On sufficient demand. Training in a comprehensive, systematic analytical approach to all style periods, and in verbalizing analytical perceptions. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 704. Symphonic Literature. (3) II. The development of orchestral music from the late Baroque to the present, with emphasis on selected symphonies of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 705. Chamber Music Literature. (3) II, in alternate years. A selected survey of masterpieces of small ensemble music from 1750 to the present. Special emphasis on the string quartet. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 706. Song Literature. (3) II, in alternate years. Survey, by historical period and national style, of major solo vocal works. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 708. Choral Literature. (3) II, in alternate years. A study of standard choral masterpieces in both large and small forms from 1450 to the present. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 711. Practical Composition and Arranging. (2) On sufficient demand. Explanation of styles and techniques applicable to contemporary commercial music. Practical arranging for the stage band. Pr.: MUSIC 213 or consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 714. Advanced Orchestration. (2) On sufficient demand. The study of orchestra and band scores. Exercises in orchestrating this type of music for different choirs of instruments, as well as scoring for full orchestra and symphonic band. Pr.: MUSIC 407 or consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 737. Organ Literature. (3) I, in alternate years. A survey of significant compositions from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on performance practice. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 738. Piano Literature. (3) I, in alternate years. Selective survey of music for piano from 1750 to the present. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 740. Studies in Music Literature. (3) On sufficient demand. Study of the repertory of a selected musical genre or medium of performance. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 766. Seminar in the Life and Works of an Individual Composer. (3) I. Study of the career and achievements of a selected composer of major stature. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 767. Topics in American Music. (3) On sufficient demand. Studies of the various genres of American music. Pr.: MUSIC 407.

    MUSIC 799. Problems in Music. (Var.) I, II, S. Individual guided work in a selected area. Pr.: Six hours graduate credit in music.

    Music education courses
    MUSIC 232. Woodwind Techniques and Materials. (1) I. A beginning course in the fundamentals of playing and methods for teaching woodwind instruments. For music majors only, and not open to woodwind majors.

    MUSIC 233. Brass Techniques and Materials. (1) II. A beginning course in the fundamentals of playing and methods for teaching brass instruments. For music majors only, and not open to brass majors.

    MUSIC 234. String Techniques and Materials. (1) I. A beginning course in the fundamentals of playing and methods for teaching stringed instruments. For music majors only, and not open to string majors.

    MUSIC 235. Percussion Techniques and Materials. (1) II. The fundamentals of playing and methods of teaching percussion instruments. For music majors only, and not open to percussion majors.

    MUSIC 405. Music for Elementary Teachers. (3) I, II, S. The contribution of music to child development in elementary schools. A study of music literature suited to children through the development of purposive listening and the expressive phases of music including rhythmic response, singing, playing, reading, and writing. Pr.: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 427. Advanced String Techniques and Materials. (1-2) II. Playing and teaching skills beyond fundamentals and presentation of materials suitable for private and public school instruction at the secondary level. Required of all instrumental majors in music education. Pr.: MUSIC 234.

    MUSIC 428. Advanced Woodwind Techniques and Materials. (1-2) II. Playing and teaching skills beyond fundamentals and presentation of materials suitable for private and public school instruction at the secondary level. Required of all instrumental majors in music education. Pr.: MUSIC 232.

    MUSIC 429. Advanced Brass Techniques and Materials. (1-2) I. Playing and teaching skills beyond fundamentals and presentation of materials suitable for private and public school instruction at the secondary level. Required of all instrumental majors in music education. Pr.: MUSIC 233.

    MUSIC 511. Music in the Schools, K-6. (4) II. The music curriculum in grades K-6, including a study of the musical characteristics of children and materials and techniques for teaching instrumental, vocal, and general music at this level. Pr.: Admission to teacher education and junior standing in music.

    MUSIC 512. Music Program in Junior/Senior High Schools. (4) I. Organization and administration of the comprehensive music program in junior and senior high schools; including the study of vocal and instrumental ensemble development, as well as techniques and materials for other types of music classes. Pr.: Admission to teacher education and junior standing in music.

    MUSIC 670. Advanced Studies in Music Education. (2) I, II, S. Advanced undergraduate studies of various topics related to the teaching of music in grades K-12. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Pr.: MUSIC 511 or 512.

    Workshops in music
    MUSIC 489. Workshop in Music. (1-2) S. Specialized interest areas for undergraduate students only. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    Organizations and ensembles
    MUSIC 111. Concert Choir. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 113. University Band. (0-1) II. Open to all interested wind and percussion performers without audition.

    MUSIC 114. Pep Band. (0-1) II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 115. Marching Band. (0-1) I. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 116. Concert Band. (0-1) II. Open to all interested wind and percussion performers without audition.

    MUSIC 117. Symphony Band. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 120. Chamber Singers. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 121. Collegiate Chorale. (0-1) I, II, S. Open to all interested singers. Audition determines membership in other choral organizations.

    MUSIC 125. K-State Singers. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition. (Not open to music majors.)

    MUSIC 130. Symphony Orchestra. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 131. Theatre Orchestra. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 135. Men's Glee Club. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 140. Women's Glee Club. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 280. Lower-Division Ensemble Performance. (1) I, II, S. Instruction is offered each semester in the following areas: brass, chamber music, concert jazz, jazz combo, strings, winds, percussion, and vocal ensemble. Admission is by audition and students may enroll in more than one ensemble simultaneously.

    MUSIC 298. Jazz Improvisation I. (1) I, II. Fundamentals of jazz harmony with emphasis on simple chord progressions, blues scales, and some modes. Performance of improvised solos based on ``standards'' and original. May be repeated once for credit. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 299. Jazz Improvisation II. (1) I, II. Continuation of Jazz Improvisation I, with emphasis on more complex chord progressions, altered scales, and other modes. May be repeated once for credit. Pr.: MUSIC 298 or consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 350. Studio Accompanying. (1) On sufficient demand. Piano student assigned to studio instructor. Accompanies lessons for at least two hours a week. Ensemble credit for pianists. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 351. Recital Accompanying. (1) On sufficient demand. Piano student assigned to a music major preparing for graduation recital. Pianist accompanies student in lessons and presents the formal public program as course requirement. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 400. Concert Choir. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 401. Concert Band. (0-1) I, II, S. Open to all interested wind and percussion performers without audition.

    MUSIC 402. Symphony Band. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 403. Collegiate Chorale. (0-1) I, II, S. Open to all interested singers. Audition determines membership in other choral organizations.

    MUSIC 404. Symphony Orchestra. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 408. Men's Glee Club. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 409. Women's Glee Club. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 411. Marching Band. (0-1) I. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 412. University Band. (0-1) II. Open to all interested wind and percussion performers by audition.

    MUSIC 414. Theatre Orchestra. (0-1) I, II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 415. Chamber Singers. (0-1) I, II, S. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 416. Pep Band. (0-1) II. Admission by audition.

    MUSIC 475. Opera Workshop. (Var.) I, II, S. Principles and techniques of operatic and musical theatre production, with emphasis on class rehearsal and performance of selected scenes from opera and musical drama; brief survey of the history of opera. Offered jointly by the Departments of Music and Speech. Vocal ensemble credit may be earned in this course. Same as THTRE 475.

    MUSIC 480. Upper-Division Ensemble Performance. (1) I, II, S. Instruction is offered each semester in the following areas: brass, chamber music, concert jazz, jazz combo, strings, winds, percussion, and vocal ensemble. Admission is by audition and students may enroll in more than one ensemble simultaneously.

    MUSIC 490. Collegium Musicum. (1) I, II, S. An ensemble devoted primarily to the performance of music written before 1700. Authentic instruments used when possible. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    Performance classes
    MUSIC 050. Recital Attendance. (0) I, II.

    MUSIC 060. Piano Proficiency. (0) I, II, S. Required for graduation of all music majors.

    MUSIC 103. Voice Class I. (1) I, II. A beginning course in the basics of singing for nonmusic majors.

    MUSIC 104. Voice Class II. (1) I, II. Singing technique skills beyond the basics to include performance skills for nonmusic majors. Pr.: MUSIC 103.

    MUSIC 203. Vocal Techniques I. (1) I, II. A beginning course in the basics of singing and teaching skills. For music education majors whose emphasis is instrumental music.

    MUSIC 204. Vocal Techniques II. (1) I, II. Singing and teaching skills beyond the basics and presentation of materials suitable for private and public school instruction at the secondary level. For music education majors whose emphasis is instrumental music. Pr.: MUSIC 203.

    MUSIC 206. Piano Class I. (1) I, II, S. For freshmen and transfer music students with no piano background. Sections also available for nonmusic majors and nondegree students.

    MUSIC 207. Piano Class II. (1) I, II, S. For freshmen and transfer students with some piano background, as well as those who have failed some or all of the Piano Proficiency Exam.

    MUSIC 208. Guitar Class I. (1) I, II. Beginning-level group instruction in guitar performance.

    MUSIC 209. Guitar Class II. (1) I, II. Intermediate-level instruction in guitar performance.

    MUSIC 260. Beginning Recorder Playing. (2) Offered on demand, only in intersessions. Learning to play the recorder; for those without previous recorder playing background. Pr.: MUSIC 100 or consent of instructor.

    MUSIC 285. Italian Diction. (1) I. Rules for pronouncing and translating Italian vocal texts.

    MUSIC 287. German Diction. (1) I. Rules for pronouncing and translating German vocal texts.

    MUSIC 391. Keyboard Pedagogy. (2) II. A systematic study of pedagogy which examines effective teaching methods and aids in the development of a philosophy of professional teaching. Pr.: Keyboard majors with conc. enrollment in MUSIC 455.

    MUSIC 410. Vocal Techniques III. (1) I. Improved singing technique with an emphasis on pedagogy and Italian diction. For music education majors whose emphasis is piano or organ. Pr.: MUSIC 203.

    MUSIC 417. Conducting. (2) I. Techniques of the baton; gestures, signs, and cues as generally used in conducting choral and instrumental organizations. Includes essentials of technique and interpretation in both choral and instrumental types of ensemble performance. For music majors only. Required before admission to student teaching. Pr.: MUSIC 406.

    MUSIC 450. Vocal Techniques IV. (1) I. More advanced singing skills. Practicum in teaching private singing lessons. For music education majors whose emphasis is piano or organ. Pr.: MUSIC 410.

    MUSIC 465. French Diction I. (1) I. Rules for pronouncing and translating French vocal texts.

    MUSIC 467. French Diction II. (1) II. Rules for pronouncing and translating French vocal texts.

    MUSIC 492. Methods and Materials for the Studio. (2) I, II, S. Methods of teaching fundamental techniques; selection of teaching materials outlining courses of study. For undergraduate students in performance curricula. Taught in divisions according to the major. Practical application through supervised studio teaching. Pr.: MUSIC 391, or consent.

    MUSIC 501. Half Recital. (0) I, II, S. Public performance; vocal or instrumental with suggested performing time of 25 minutes.

    MUSIC 502. Full Recital. (0) I, II, S. Public performance; vocal or instrumental with suggested performing time of 50 minutes.

    Studio performance
    MUSIC 251. Pre-Performance Study. (Var.) I, II, S. For students who do not meet standards for regular performance study.

    MUSIC 255. Lower-Division Performance. (Var.) I, II, S. Instruction is offered every semester in voice and each of the following instruments: baritone, bassoon, clarinet, double bass, early winds, flute, french horn, guitar, harp, harpsichord, oboe, organ, percussion, piano, saxophone, trombone, trumpet, tuba, viola, viola da gamba, violin, and violoncello. Students may enroll in more than one instrument simultaneously and may earn 1 to 4 hours per semester in each instrument.

    MUSIC 455. Upper-Division Performance. (Var.) I, II, S. Instruction is offered every semester in voice and each of the following instruments: baritone, bassoon, clarinet, double bass, early winds, flute, french horn, guitar, harp, harpsichord, oboe, organ, percussion, piano, saxophone, trombone, trumpet, tuba, viola, viola da gamba, violin, and violoncello. Students may enroll in more than one instrument simultaneously and may earn 1 to 4 hours per semester in each instrument.

    MUSIC 521. Composition. (Var.) I, II, S.

    MUSIC 641. Secondary Performance Area. (1-2) For graduate students who wish to study an instrument (or voice) other than the major performance area. Pedagogical methods and fundamentals are stressed.

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    Kansas State University
    February 7, 2001