ugrad2000Home
ugrad2000
Enter either a:
  • Person's name (faculty, staff, or student)
  • Department name
  • Word to find on a web page

    More Search Options
  •  

    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2002
     

    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
    Services for Students
    Auxiliary Services and Facilities
    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    dMajors and Degrees
    dDegree Requirements
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences
    dBachelor of Fine Arts
    dBachelor of Music
    dBachelor of Music Education
    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley
    dProgram Options
    dAdvising
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies
    dPre-Law
    dPre-Health Professions Program
    dAerospace Studies
    dAnthropology
    dArt
    dBiochemistry
    dBiology
    dChemistry
    dEconomics
    dEnglish
    dGeography
    dGeology
    dHistory
    dJournalism and Mass Communications
    dKinesiology
    dMathematics
    dMilitary Science
    dModern Languages
    dMusic
    dPhilosophy
    dPhysics
    dPolitical Science
    dPsychology
    dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dStatistics
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    Technology and Aviation
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    English

    Lawrence Rodgers,* Head

    Professors Dees,* Hedrick,* Heller,* Holden,* Keiser,* Kremer,* Machor,* T. Murray,* and L. Warren;* Associate Professors Brigham,* Dayton,* Dodd,* Donnelly,* Eiselein,* Franko,* Hall,* Nelson,* L. Rodgers,* Smit,* Ward,* and Wood;* Assistant Professors Hauck,* Hubler,* Janette,* Phillips,* Potts,* and Wheatley;* Instructors Baker, Chakrabarti, M. Clark, Cokinos, Dillon, Friedmann, Kolonosky, Mosher, D. Murray, Ransom, S. Rodgers, Seltzer, and A. Warren; Emeriti: Professors Eitner, Gillespie, Johnston, McCarthy, Moses, Noonan, Nyberg, Rees, and M. Schneider; Associate Professors Adams, Ansdell, Brondell, Cohen, Conrow, Geissler, Grindell, and H. Schneider; Assistant Professor Glenn; Instructors Bergman, Bussing, Clark, Frazier, Pelischek, Rochat, and Vance.

    E-mail: english@ksu.edu
    www.ksu.edu/english

    Bachelor of arts
    Students may elect to earn a B.A. in the department through a course of study based on one of the following three patterns.

    Note: Students must achieve a C or better in ENGL 252 for the course to count for major credit.

    Literature track

    ENGL 252Introduction to Literary Studies  3
    One Shakespeare course  3
    One language course (430, 476, 490)  3
    Two ``Survey'' courses in one national literature  6
    (361 and 362 or 381 and 382)
    Three English courses numbered 320-599  9
    Four English courses numbered 600 and above 12
    36
     
    Students must take at least 6 hours of American literature and 6 hours of British literature other than Shakespeare. At least 15 of the 21 hours in courses numbered 320 and above must be literature courses.
     
    Literature and creative writing track
    ENGL 252Introduction to Literary Studies 3
    One Shakespeare course 3
    One language course (430, 476, 490) 3
    Any two ``Survey'' courses 6
    ENGL 410Introduction to Creative Writing 3
    Three advanced creative writing courses in at least
    two genres 9
    Two literature courses numbered 600 and above 6
    One course in literature or language numbered 320
    and above 3
    36
     
    Students must take at least 6 hours of American literature and 6 hours of British literature other than Shakespeare.
     
    Literature with teaching certification track
    ENGL 252Introduction to Literary Studies 3
    One Shakespeare course 3
    ENGl 400Advanced Expository Writing for
    Prospective Teachers 3
    ENGL 430The Structure of English 3
    ENGL 490Development of the English Language 3
    Any two ``Survey'' courses 6
    A world literature course 3
    ENGL 545Literature for Adolescents 3
    Three literature courses numbered 600 and above 9
    Composition elective 3
    39
     
    Students must take at least 6 hours of American literature and 6 hours of British literature other than Shakespeare.
     
    English minor
    Students have two options for the minor in English, one emphasizing literature, the other emphasizing writing:

    English minor with an emphasis in literature
    ENGL 252Introduction to Literary Studies 3
    Two of the four American and/or British survey courses 6
    (choose two: ENGL 361, 362, 381, 382)
    Any three courses ENGL 300 or above 3
    (one of these must be a literature course numbered 600 or above)
    18
     
    English minor with an emphasis in writing
    ENGL 252Introduction to Literary Studies  3
    One American or British survey course  3
    (choose one: ENGL 361, 362, 381, 382)
    Any four writing courses ENGL 300 or above) 12
    (choose four : ENGL 300, 400, 415, 461, 463, 510, 516, 562, 604, 661, 663
    18
     
    NOTE: ENGL 415 is open only to engineering majors.
     
    Teacher certification
    Students preparing to teach English in high school may adopt either of two programs: the major outlined above, leading to the B.A. degree; or the College of Education major in secondary education, leading to the B.S. degree. Majors desiring certification should consult their advisors in both the English department and the College of Education.

    For specific certification requirements in secondary education, see the College of Education section of this catalog.

    English courses
    ENGL 030. Writing Laboratory. (1-4) I, II, S. Credit/No Credit. Laboratory practice in writing for all students who need review in fundamentals of composition. Especially for students who have difficulty in meeting standards in Expository Writing I and II, but also designed to assist students who desire to improve their composition skills. Hours are not applicable toward degree requirements. May be repeated up to 6 hours maximum. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

    ENGL 035. Special Studies in Intensive English. (2-12) I, II, S. Equivalent to enrollment in one or two segments (structure, writing, reading, or speaking and listening) of Intermediate Intensive English I or II. Placement by the English Language Program according to the student's needs and ability level.

    ENGL 036. Beginning Intensive English I. (15) I, II. Introduction to basic English syntax, writing, reading, speaking, and listening for native speakers of other languages. No prior knowledge of English required.

    ENGL 038. Beginning Intensive English II. (15) I, II. Intensive study of basic English syntax, writing, reading, speaking, and listening for native speakers of other languages. Pr.: Minimum TOEFL score of 350.

    ENGL 040. Intermediate Intensive English I. (15) I, II. Intensive study of basic English sentence structure, writing, reading, speaking, and listening for native speakers of other languages. Pr.: Minimum TOEFL score of 400.

    ENGL 050. Intermediate Intensive English II. (15) I, II. Continued intensive study of English structure, writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Placement by the English Language Program.

    ENGL 052. Advanced Intensive English. (15) I, II. Advanced intensive study of English writing, reading, speaking, and listening with emphasis on university-level tasks. Placement by the English Language Program.

    DAS 060. Summer Intensive English. (10) S. Intensive study of English for native speakers of other languages. Instruction in English language structure, writing, reading, speaking, and comprehension.

    ENGL 070. Advanced English as a Second Language. (6) I, II. A support course required of international students whose performance on the English screening test indicates that they would still benefit from half-time instruction in English. Three specialized sections are offered: for undergraduates, for graduate students in technical fields, and for graduate students in non-technical fields. Placement by the English Language Program or on the recommendation of an advisor.

    ENGL 075. English for International Students. (3) I, II. Distinguished from DAS 060 by being a nonintensive, 3-hour university support course. English structure, reading, and writing for graduate or undergraduate nonactive speakers who wish to reduce a written language deficiency or to prepare for Composition I. Required of students who do not pass the Written English Proficiency Test. Students may also be admitted on recommendation of their advisor. Repeatable if necessary.

    Introductory courses not for major credit, except for the required ENGL 252. Repeatable once (where indicated) with change of syllabus.

    ENGL 100. Expository Writing I. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to expressive and informative writing. Frequent discussions, workshops, and conferences. Offers extensive practice in the process of writing: getting ideas, drafting, analyzing drafts, revising, and editing.

    ENGL 110. Honors English I. (3) I, II, S. Critical reading and writing for first-year students with high ACT scores. Students may also be admitted at the discretion of the director of expository writing program. Each individual section will concentrate on themes determined by the instructor.

    ENGL 125. Honors English II. (3) I, II, S. Advanced critical reading and writing. Students who receive A in ENGL 100 may, on the recommendation of their instructor and the director of the expository writing program, be admitted. Students who are members in good standing of one of the various college honors programs may also be admitted. Otherwise, admission is on the same basis as that for ENGL 110. Each individual section will concentrate on themes determined by the instructor.

    ENGL 150. English Studies Abroad. (2-3) Intersession only. Travel abroad, with selected readings, lectures, and discussions which explore the relationships between literary texts and their physical and cultural environments.

    ENGL 200. Expository Writing II. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to writing persuasively and in response to literature. As with ENGL 100, uses discussions, workshops, and conferences, and emphasizes the writing process. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110 and sophomore standing.

    ENGL 220. Fiction into Film. (2) I, II, S. Discussions of film adaptation of works of literature.

    University General Education courseENGL 230. Humanities: Classical Cultures. (3) I, II, S. As do the following three courses (ENGL 231-234), develops an understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the humanistic resources of Western culture by examining great works of literature, philosophy, art, music, and religion in each major period. The four courses may be taken individually and in any order.

    ENGL 231. Humanities: Medieval and Renaissance. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 233. Humanities: Baroque and Enlightenment. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 234. Humanities: Modern. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 251. Introduction to Literature. (3) I, II, S. Study of form and technique in works of fiction, poetry, and drama.

    ENGL 252. Introduction to Literary Studies. (3) I, II, S. Elements of literary form and style: an introduction to criticism for English majors. Intended as a first course in the analysis of form and technique, an introduction to literary terms commonly used in later courses, and practice in critical writing. Readings from a broad range: poems, plays, essays, and novels.

    University General Education courseENGL 261. British Literature: Medieval and Renaissance. (3) I, II, S. Major works to about 1700, selected for the general student, emphasizes Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Will not apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    University General Education courseENGL 262. British Literature: Enlightenment to Modern. (3) I, II, S. Major works since about 1700, selected for the general student. Will not apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    University General Education courseENGL 271. American Literature: Colonial through Romantic. (3) I, II, S. Major works selected for the general student. Will not apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    University General Education courseENGL 272. American Literature: Realists and Moderns. (3) I, II, S. Major works selected for the general student. Will not apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    ENGL 280. Selected American Ethnic Literatures. (3) I, II, S. Selected studies in ethnic literatures of the United States, including African, Asian, Hispanic, Jewish, and Native Americans. Repeatable.

    University General Education courseENGL 287. Great Books. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to world classics from past to present.

    University General Education courseENGL 295. Selected Studies in English. (1-3) Intersession. Selected studies in literature, language, rhetoric, and cultural studies. Repeatable with change in subject. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110. May not be used for English major credit.

    University General Education courseENGL 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) I. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Emphasis on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. Limited to entering freshmen. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as HIST 297, MLANG 297, PHILO 297.

    University General Education courseENGL 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) II. Continuation of ENGL 297. Pr.: ENGL 297 or consent of instructor. Same as HIST 298, MLANG 298, PHILO 298.

    ENGL 299. Honors Topics in English. (3) I, II. Readings and colloquia in selected topics in literature or language. Pr.: Open only to arts and sciences honors program students and to others completing ENGL 100 or 200 and 110 or 125 with a 3.5 GPA.

    Courses for major credit (except ENGL 300 and 399)
    ENGL 300. Expository Writing III. (3) I, II, S. Advanced practice in writing a variety of expository forms: personal essays and informative and persuasive reports. Additional work on style and the demands of various rhetorical situations. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 320. The Short Story. (3) I, II, S. Study of short stories from world literature with emphasis on American, British, and Continental.

    ENGL 330. The Novel. (3) I, II, S. Novels selected from various periods and cultures. Concern for form and critical analysis.

    ENGL 340. Poetry. (3) I, II, S. Close reading of poems and analysis of poetic genres, with emphasis on modern poetry.

    ENGL 345. Drama. (3) I, II, S. Study of drama from classical times to the present.

    ENGL 350. Introduction to Shakespeare. (3) I, II, S. Study of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies.

    ENGL 355. Literature for Children. (3) I, II, S. Survey of literature for children. Emphasizes the reading and evaluating of books for children. For teachers of elementary grades. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

    ENGL 361. British Survey I. (3) I, II, S. English literature from Anglo-Saxon times through Milton. Will apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    ENGL 362. British Survey II. (3) I, II, S. English literature from Dryden to the end of the nineteenth century. Will apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    ENGL 381. American Survey I. (3) I, II, S. American literature from the early accounts of colonization through the American Renaissance. Will apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    ENGL 382. American Survey II. (3) I, II, S. American literature from the Civil War to the present. Will apply to survey requirement for English majors.

    University General Education courseENGL 390. Fable and Fantasy. (3) I, II, S. Study of modern works in the fabulous or fantastic modes in relation to the traditions underlying them. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110.

    ENGL 395. Topics in English. (1-3) I, II, S. Selected studies in literature and language. Repeatable with change in topic.

    University General Education courseENGL 399. Honors Seminar in English. (1-3) Readings and colloquia in selected masterpieces. May not be used for English major credit. Pr.: Honors students only.

    Courses for major and nonmajor credit
    ENGL 400. Advanced Expository Writing for Prospective Teachers. (3) I, II, S. Expository writing and a brief introduction to the history and theory of teaching writing, primarily for candidates for Secondary certification in English. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 415. Written Communication for Engineers. (3) I, II, S. Study and intensive use of writing forms characteristic of professional practice. Pr.: Enrollment in the Col- lege of Engineering with junior or senior standing and ENGL 100 or equivalent with A or B credit or ENGL 200.

    University General Education courseENGL 420. Literature and Film. (3) I, II, S. Emphasizes such matters as the turning of a story, novel, play into film; the handling of point of view; the interrelating of techniques between fiction and film; and the comparing of the forms of fiction and film. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 430. The Structure of English. (3) I, II, S. Systematic study of the structure of the English language and a consideration of the current theories of analysis: traditional, structural, and transformational-generative. Primarily for candidates for secondary certification in English or for elementary language arts majors. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 440. Themes in Literature. (1-3) I, II, S. Explores the literary treatment of important and recurring themes. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 445. Literary Kinds. (1-3) I, II, S. Examines the characteristics, the growth and development, or the uses of specified literary genres. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    University General Education courseENGL 450. Literature and Society. (1-3) I, II, S. Literature in relation to social and cultural patterns and influences. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 461. Introduction to Fiction Writing. (3) I, II, S. A practical introduction to short fiction writing. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 463. Introduction to Poetry Writing. (3) I, II, S. A practical introduction to poetry writing. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 465.  Introduction to Creative Nonfiction. (3) I, II.  A practical introduction to creative nonfiction or what can be called "the literature of fact."  Writers of creative nonfiction use many of the stylistic and literary tools that fiction writers and poets use, but in the service of rendering factual, literally accurate prose.  Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 470. English Bible. (3) I, II, S. The Bible as literature and history and the cultural and historical backgrounds of the Old Testament. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 476. American English. (3) I, II, S. A systematic study of the English language as it has been and is spoken in the continental United States. Topics may include Tall Talk, Americanisms, Colonial and Modern dialects, and American dictionaries. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 485. Introduction to History and Theory of Composition and Rhetoric. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to primary issues and representative writers on rhetoric from ancient Greece and Rome to the present. Emphasizes the relationship of such material to writing instruction in Western civilization. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 490. Development of the English Language. (3) I, II, S. Depicts the English language in its place among other world languages, and introduces students to the major ways in which English has changed through time. Considers both internal and external influences as causes of language change. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 492. Humanities Seminar. (3) I, II. Study in depth of selected major figures and movements in Western arts, ideas, and literature. Offered each semester within one of the chronological periods of the introductory courses. Pr.: Appropriate introductory humanities course (or an equiv. background, such as courses in Western civilization, art, or world literature, with consent of instructor).

    ENGL 497. Special Investigations in English. (Var.) I, II, S. Individual investigation in authors, genres, periods of literature or language. Pr.: Background of preparation needed for investigation undertaken.

    ENGL 498. Honors Tutorial in English. (1-3) I, II, S. Individually guided study in which the student will formulate and explore a narrowly defined topic in literature or language. May be used to initiate research for senior honors thesis. Pr.: Consent of tutorial instructor.

    ENGL 499. Senior Honors Thesis. (2) I, II, S. Open only to seniors in the arts and sciences honors program.

    Undergraduate and graduate credit in minor field
    ENGL 516. Written Communication for the Sciences. (3) I, II, S. Theory and intensive writing practice for students in the basic and applied sciences. Pr.: Junior standing and ENGL 125 or 200. Will not substitute for ENGL 415.

    ENGL 525. Women in Literature. (3) I, II, S. Literary works by or about women. Treats writers considered within various traditions, themes, or formal issues. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 535. Literature of Aging. (3) I, II, S. Concerned with the problems of and the responses to aging as reflected in fiction, drama, and poetry. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 545. Literature for Adolescents. (3) I, II, S. Selecting, reading, and evaluating books for adolescents. For those seeking junior and senior high school certification and students of guidance for adolescents. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

    ENGL 562. Playwriting. (3) I, II, S. Theoretical study and practical application of techniques of playwriting with regard to plot, characters, and production; emphasis on the one-act form. Same as THTRE 562.

    University General Education courseENGL 580. Selected World Literature. (3) I, II, S. This course primarily addresses writing by authors whose native origins lie elsewhere than in Europe or the United States. The content of the course varies from instructor to instructor. The course may examine literature from several countries and regions, concentrate upon literature for one country or region, or focus on a topic which transcends national or regional boundaries. Works studied will have been written in or translated into English. Pr.: ENGL 120 or 125.

    ENGL 599. Special Research in English. (Var.) I, II, S. Individual investigation in authors, genres, periods of literature, or language. Background of preparation needed for investigation undertaken.

    Undergraduate and graduate credit
    ENGL 604. Expository Writing Workshop. (3) I, II, S. Course emphasizes style analysis of modern non-fiction prose in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Extensive student writing on assignments appropriate to germane topics. Pr.: Junior standing.

    ENGL 605-660. Readings Courses. Readings courses are designed primarily for advanced undergraduates although graduate students may also enroll in them. These courses constitute a sequence of period studies covering the chronological range of English and American literature. Within these historical periods, the specific course contents will vary by semester and instructor. They may emphasize literary figures and movements, historical and cultural contexts, or different genres and forms within the periods. Each semester's offerings will be specifically described before each enrollment period in university and department publications. The courses require junior standing and are repeatable with change of subject matter.

    ENGL 605. Readings in Medieval Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 610. Readings in Renaissance Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 620. Readings in Seventeenth Century British Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 625. Readings in Eighteenth Century British Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 630. Readings in Nineteenth Century British Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 635. Readings in Twentieth Century British Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 640. Readings in Early American Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 645. Readings in Nineteenth Century American Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 650. Readings in Twentieth Century American Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 655. Readings in American Ethnic-Minorities Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 660. Readings in Major Authors. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 661. Advanced Creative Writing: Prose Fiction. (3) I, II, S. Advanced writing of prose fiction. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 461 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 663. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry. (3) I, II, S. Advanced writing of poetry. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 463 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 670-695. Topics Courses. Topics courses are designed primarily for advanced undergraduates although graduate students may enroll in them. These courses address topics not confined to a single period in a national literature. Specific course content will vary by semester and instructor. It may emphasize cross-national subjects, literary criticism, the development of a theme or genre over time, new perspectives from social, intellectual, or cultural studies, or non-traditional texts and topics. Each semester's offerings will be described more specifically in university and department publications before each enrollment period. The courses require junior standing and are repeatable with change of subject matter.

    ENGL 670. Topics in British Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 680. Topics in American Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 690. Topics in Literature for the Young. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 695. Topics in Literature. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 700. Old English. (3) I, II, S. The elements of Old English grammar, with readings in prose and poetry. Pr.: Instructor permission.

    ENGL 705. Theory and Practice of Cultural Studies. (3) I, II, S. An overview of selected approaches to the study of culture and of their current application in English studies, including psychoanalytic, feminist, marxist, and structuralist approaches. Pr.: Junior standing.

    ENGL 710-759. Studies Courses. Studies courses are designed primarily for graduate students, although advanced undergraduate students may also enroll in them. Their specific contents will vary by semester and instructor, but the courses will reflect concerns with literary and rhetorical forms and genres; with specific authors, periods, or literary movements; with perspectives from social, intellectual, and cultural studies; or with literary themes; or with language or linguistics. Each semester's offerings will be described more specifically in university and department publications before each enrollment period. The courses require junior standing and are repeatable with change of subject matter.

    ENGL 710. Studies in a Literary Genre. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 720. Studies in a Major Author. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 730. Studies in a Literary Period. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 740. Studies in a Literary Theory. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 755. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 757. Studies in Language and Linguistics. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 759. Studies in Technical Communications. (3) I, II, S.

    ENGL 761. Creative Writing Workshop: Short Fiction. (3) I, II, S. Advanced writing of short prose fiction. Repeatable twice for credit. Pr.: ENGL 661 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 762. Advanced Playwriting. (3) I, II, S. Same as THTRE 762.

    ENGL 763. Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry. (3) I, II, S. Advanced writing of poetry. Repeatable twice. Pr.: ENGL 663 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 771. Creative Writing Workshop: Novel. (3) I, II, S. Repeatable twice. Pr.: ENGL 661 or instructor permission.

    ENGL 795. Literary Criticism. (3) I, II, S. Major points of view in modern American and British criticism, with practice in the analysis and judgment of individual literary works. Pr.: Senior standing.

    ENGL 799. Problems in English. (Var.) I, II, S. Independent study in major authors, genres, and periods of English and American literature and language. Pr.: Background of courses needed for problem undertaken.

    Linguistics courses
    Undergraduate and graduate credit
    ENGL 600. Principles of Linguistics. (3) I, II. The scientific study of language, with examples from English, Spanish, French, German, and others. Overview of language origins, phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, dialects, language change, and writing systems. Same as LING 600 and LG 600.

    ENGL 601. General Phonetics. (3) I or II, in alternate years. Description and classification of speech sounds according to point and manner of articulation. Transcription in the International Phonetic Association Alphabet. Includes sounds of English, French, Spanish, German, and others. Same as LING 601 and LG 601.

    ENGL 602. Historical Linguistics. (3) I or II, in alternate years. Internal and comparative reconstruction of earlier forms of languages. Genetic relationships in language families, and various typological considerations. Includes French, Spanish, and others. Same as LING 602 and LG 602.

    ENGL 603. Topics in Linguistics. (3) I or II, in alternate years. Seminar on a special topic in linguistics. Topic to be announced for semester in which offered. Repeatable for credit on a different topic. Same as LING 603 and LG 603.

    Topics within Arts and Sciences:
    dMajors and Degrees dAerospace Studies dMathematics
    dDegree Requirements dAnthropology dMilitary Science
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences dArt dModern Languages
    dBachelor of Fine Arts dBiochemistry dMusic
    dBachelor of Music dBiology dPhilosophy
    dBachelor of Music Education dChemistry dPhysics
    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley dEconomics dPolitical Science
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley dEnglish dPsychology
    dProgram Options dGeography dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dAdvising dGeology dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies dHistory dStatistics
    dPre-Law dJournalism and Mass Communications   
    dPre-Health Professions Program dKinesiology   
    start of standard bottom bar

    Kansas State University
    May 17, 2001