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    K-State Undergraduate Catalog 2000-2002
     

    About the Catalog
    About the University
    Calendar
    Glossary and Abbreviations
    Admission
    Academic Advising
    Enrollment
    Tuition and Fees
    Degrees
    Grades
    All-University Regulations
    Student Financial Assistance
    Services for Students
    Auxiliary Services and Facilities
    International Programs
    Secondary Majors
    Agriculture
    Architecture, Planning, and Design
    Arts and Sciences
    dMajors and Degrees
    dDegree Requirements
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences
    dBachelor of Fine Arts
    dBachelor of Music
    dBachelor of Music Education
    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley
    dProgram Options
    dAdvising
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies
    dPre-Law
    dPre-Health Professions Program
    dAerospace Studies
    dAnthropology
    dArt
    dBiochemistry
    dBiology
    dChemistry
    dEconomics
    dEnglish
    dGeography
    dGeology
    dHistory
    dJournalism and Mass Communications
    dKinesiology
    dMathematics
    dMilitary Science
    dModern Languages
    dMusic
    dPhilosophy
    dPhysics
    dPolitical Science
    dPsychology
    dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dStatistics
    Business Administration
    Education
    Engineering
    Human Ecology
    Technology and Aviation
    Veterinary Medicine
    Graduate School
    Intercollegiate Athletics
    K-State Research and Extension
    Outreach
    University Faculty
     

    Art

    Anna Calluori Holcombe,* Head

    Professors Calluori Holcombe,* Hower,* Kren,* Ikeda,* Munce,* and Pujol;* Associate Professors Andrus,* Clore, Culley,* Noblett,* Rex Replogle,* Schmidt,* Shang,* and Woodward;* Assistant Professors Bookwalter, Brown,* Hunt,* Miller,* Nellis,* Renata Replogle, Routson,* and Swiler;* Adjunct Assistant Professor King; Emeriti: Professors Garzio,* Larmer, and Sturr;* Associate Professors Hill and Vogt; Assistant Professor Dollar, Love, Ogg, O'Shea,* and Winegardner; Instructor Hagan.

    E-mail: art@ksu.edu
    www.ksu.edu/art

    Bachelor of arts
    The B.A. degree in art consists of three parts: the general education courses outlined under the humanities curriculum; a core of beginning art courses to provide prerequisites and a broad range of art experience for the art major; and 15 hours concentration of related subjects that should provide a minimal basis for establishing professional competence.

    Concentration possibilities are in one of the following: painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, drawing, art history, metalsmithing and jewelry, graphic design, illustration, or digital arts.

    The bachelor of arts degree requires a minimum of 48 semester hours in art. The major requirements are as follows:

    Art history (12 hours)
    ART 195Survey of Art History I  3
    ART 196Survey of Art History II  3
    ART 545Twentieth Century Art History I  3
    ART 550Twentieth Century Art History II  3
     
    ART 1002D Design  3
    ART 2003D Design  3
    ART 190Drawing I  3
    ART 210Drawing II  3
    ART 225Figure Drawing I  3
    Two-dimensional course choice*  3
    Three-dimensional course choice**  3
    Major concentration 15
     
    *Two-dimensional courses: Type and Design Principles, Oil Painting I, Photography in Art, Printmaking I, Watermedia I.
     
    **Three-dimensional courses: Ceramics I, Metalsmith and Jewelry, Sculpture I.
     
    Bachelor of fine arts
    The bachelor of fine arts degree is a professionally oriented undergraduate degree in art. It is designed primarily for those planning to become professional artists, artist-teachers, or art therapists. Greater emphasis is placed on actual practice in the creative art disciplines.

    The degree is considered the appropriate preparation for the master of fine arts degree, which is recognized as the terminal degree in studio arts, and for a master's degree in art therapy, which is required for registration as an art therapist. The B.F.A. in art is a four-year, 120-hour program with concentrations possible in painting, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design, printmaking, drawing, metalsmithing and jewelry, illustration, digital arts, and pre-art therapy.

    Concentration admission procedure
    Formal evaluation prior to admission to a chosen area of concentration is required upon completion of Department of Art foundation core. A display of selected completed foundation core work will occur at the end of the semester when the last of eight foundation courses (24 credit hours) will be completed. Visual course work must meet faculty approval, and a minimum 2.75 GPA in foundation courses is required. Upon passing the concentration admission procedure students may begin BFA study in the area of concentration they have selected.

    An additional review opportunity is allowed after an unsuccessful attempt to pass the concentration admission procedure. The second attempt must be made at the end of the semester following the unsuccessful effort to pass the concentration admission procedure. The second attempt may, if so requested, occur in an area different from the first unsuccessful attempt.

    Students not successful in a second attempt to pass the concentration admission procedure will be advised to consider the BA degree in art. For complete details on the concentration admission procedure, students may get a copy of the requirements from the Department of Art advisor.

    The major requirements are as follows:

    Foundation core
    ART 1002D Design  3
    ART 2003D Design  3
    ART 190Drawing I  3
    ART 210Drawing II  3
    ART 225Figure Drawing I  3
    Two-dimensional course choice*  3
    Three-dimensional course choice**  3
    Two- or three-dimensional course choice*,**  3
     
    Additional requirements
    Art history (15 hours)
    ART 195Survey of Art History I  3
    ART 196Survey of Art History II  3
     
    20th century art history requirement (6 hours)
    Any two of the following:
    ART 54520th Century Art History I  3
    ART 55020th Century Art History II  3
    ART 60220th Century Art History III  3
    ART 60320th Century Art History IV  3
     
    Art history electives  3
    ART 410B.F.A. Exhibition  0
    Major concentration 21
    Art electives 15
    75
     
    *Two-dimensional courses: Type and Design Principles, Oil Painting I, Photography in Art, Printmaking I, Watermedia I.
     
    **Three-dimensional courses: Ceramics I, Metalsmith and Jewelry, Sculpture I.
     
    Studios, laboratories, and equipment for creative work are provided and adequate to the needs of the art areas. Student work may be retained at the discretion of the faculty for an indefinite period of time for instructional and exhibition purposes.

    Art education
    Students may satisfy requirements to teach art in public schools by any of three programs: B.A. and teacher certification; B.F.A. and teacher certification; or B.S. in education with art concentration. Under the first two options students qualify for teacher certification by completing specified courses in the College of Education. See the College of Education approved programs section for more information.

    Pre-art therapy
    The B.F.A. with a pre-art therapy concentration provides a strong background in studio art and psychology plus an introduction to the field of art therapy. This program of study prepares students to do graduate studies in art therapy and related fields. To pursue a pre-art therapy concentration students must have completed 60 or more semester hours with a minimum of 2.5 K-State GPA overall. Completed K-State course work must include 9 hours of art studio and 9 hours of psychology.

    Transfer students
    Art hours transferred to K-State will be assigned by the art department. Students may use transfer hours toward their area of concentration only when obtained from a four-year college or university.

    Computer application
    The Department of Art includes a number of concentrations that require the use of the computer. The department, in order to help prepare students for their professional activities requires that students within these concentrations provide or have access to a computer and software to enhance their course of study. The Department of Art will provide information related to hardware and software options.

    Art courses
    ART 095. Art Assembly. (0) I, II. Recommended for all art and art education majors each semester. By appt.

    University General Education courseART 100. 2 Dimensional Design. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to and laboratory practice in the principles and elements of design. Emphasis is placed on organizational command of the two-dimensional picture plane and issues of illusion. Six hours lab.

    University General Education courseART 190. Drawing I. (3) I, II, S. Fundamentals of drawing as applied to the realistic and expressive representation of objects through the use of a variety of media and approaches. Six hour lab.

    ART 193. Beach Museum Seminar and Contemporary Society. (3) I, II. An introduction to the Beach Museum as an example of the function of a museum in contemporary society. Lec.

    University General Education courseART 195. Survey of Art History I. (3) I. Historical development of art from pre-history through the Middle Ages.

    University General Education courseART 196. Survey of Art History II. (3) II. Historical development of art from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century.

    ART 200. 3 Dimensional Design. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to and laboratory practice in the principals and element of design. Emphasis is place in the perceptions and use of spatial properties as related to components of three- dimensional art and design. Six hours lab.

    ART 201. Graphic Design Survey. (1) I, II. Overview of the historical, cultural, and social issues related to the practice of visual communications. Lec.

    ART 205. Graphic Design Studio I. (3) I, II. Development and preparation of design concepts for application to the printing process. (Black and white and color.) Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 201, 290.

    ART 210. Drawing II. (3) I, II. Continuation of Drawing I, with strong emphasis on creative expression. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190.

    ART 220. Water Media I. (3) I, II. Introduction to painting with water-based media through a variety of techniques. Emphasis is placed on learning transparent watercolor. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190.

    ART 225. Figure Drawing I. (3) I, II. Sustained drawings of the human figure using a variety of media; introduction to human anatomy used by artists.Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 210.

    ART 230. Sculpture I. (3) I, II. An introduction to the problems of sculptural form; fundamental techniques and theory in woodcarving, clay modeling, mold making, casting, oxy/acetylene welding, and metal casting. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 200.

    ART 235. Printmaking I. (3) I, II. Introduction to the intaglio, lithographic relief, and serigraphic printmaking techniques and tools. Six hours lab. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 100, 190.

    ART 240. Drawing III. (3) I, II. Continuation of Drawing II, emphasizing exploration in mixed media. Six hours lab. May be taken for two semesters. Pr.: ART 225.

    ART 245. Oil Painting I. (3) I, II. Introduction to oil painting through a variety of techniques. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190.

    ART 265. Ceramics I. (3) I, II. Introduction to basic hand building techniques; decoration of ceramic forms using slips, stains, glazes. Student participation in Raku firing procedures; stacking and firing of electric kilns. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 200.

    ART 270. Metalsmithing and Jewelry. (3) I, II, S. Design and execution of small-scale, three-dimensional objects, involving the basic processes of raising, forging, and fabrication in semi-precious metals. The techniques of centrifugal and vacuum casting of precious metals will also be introduced as well as soldering and piercing. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 200 or nonmajors consent of instructor.

    ART 280. Art Education Seminar. (3) II. An introduction to concepts in art education. Research, literature, creativity, aesthetics, and the history of art education as they relate to teaching art. Six hours lab.

    ART 285 Illustration. (3) I, II, S. Exploration of various applied drawing/painting/collage techniques and how they relate to illustration and layout. Various traditional and digital media will be utilized. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 201.

    ART 290. Type and Design Principles. (3) I, II. Application of design and type principles to the development of letterforms and to principles of symbology. Selected topics in design, i.e., perception, figure/ground; shape, visual dynamics, Gestalt principle; fundamentals of the design process: research, thumbnails/roughs, comprehensive, presentation, paste-up, and digital fines. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 201

    ART 295. Photography in Art I. (3) I, II. Understanding and using photography as an art form. The basic elements and principles of art are explored. Camera usage and photographic processing are covered. An adjustable camera is required. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190 or consent of instructor.

    ART 298. Concentration Admission Procedure. (0) I, II. The preparation and display of a student's own creative work, upon completion of the Department of Art 24-credit-hour core. The concentration admission procedure occurs after student selection of an area of concentration within the BFA art major format and the attainment of a minimum GPA of 2.75 within the eight-studio-course core.

    ART 300. Special Studies in Art. (1-3) I, II. Specialized workshops or seminars conducted in studio, art therapy, art education, or art history. Lec.

    ART 301. Human Form and Composition. (3) Intersessions only. Building stylization and expressive image making of the human form with experimental methods: use of color, mono-print, mixed media. A connected and sustained studio time available during intersession only, providing students a working rhythm without interruption from other course work. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190.

    ART 305. Introduction to Museum Studies. (3) I, II. Fundamentals of museum work including specific museum functions, role of professional personnel, and proper care and handling of art works.

    ART 376. Studio Art Exploration. (3) II. Studio experiences in a variety of media including printmaking, fibers, drawing, and sculpture. Art materials, techniques, and process are explored. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 100, 190, and 200.

    ART 386. Photography in Art II. (3) I, II, S. Creative exploration of broad-based approaches to photographic images. Both camera and darkroom manipulations will be used in the process of image making. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 295.

    ART 395. Digital Photography. (3) I, II. Introduction to the principles and aesthetics of digital image processing. Hands-on activities will permit each student to explore the creative potential of electronic photography and imaging. Pr.: ART 386 and instructor permission.

    University General Education courseART 399. Sophomore Honors Seminar in Art. (3) Selected topics in art. Pr.: For students in the honors program only.

    ART 400. Computer Imaging. (3) I, II, S. Exploration of computer imaging through the use of paint system and image processing technologies. Two hours lecture, four hours lab a week. Pr.: ART 200 and 210.

    ART 405. Illustration II. (3) I, II. Advanced studio that explores various techniques in illustration in traditional and digital media. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 285.

    ART 410. B.F.A. Exhibition. (0) I, II. The preparation and execution of a senior exhibition of the student's own creative work primarily from his/her area of concentration. The option of a portfolio presentation exists for students whose area of concentration is graphic design. The student will be responsible for all the arrangements for the exhibition including scheduling, installation, and publicity.

    ART 425. Art for Elementary Schools. (3) I, II, S. Art methods, materials, and philosophy of children's art at different grade levels. Six hours lab.

    ART 430. Independent Study—Ceramics. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in ceramics after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 435. Independent Study—Crafts. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in crafts after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 440. Independent Study—Drawing. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in drawing after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 445. Independent Study—Graphic Design. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in graphic design after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 450. Independent Study—Metalsmithing and Jewelry. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in metalsmithing and jewelry after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 455. Independent Study—Painting. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in painting after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized. Permission of instructor and painting area head required.

    ART 460. Independent Study—Printmaking. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in printmaking after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 465. Independent Study—Sculpture. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in sculpture after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 470. Independent Study—Water Color. (1-5) I, II, S. Work in water color after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized.

    ART 480. Independent Study/Research Computer Art and Design. (3) I, II, S. This course is intended to provide students an opportunity to focus on a specific visual project/problem that will be solved using computers to focus on as the primary tool/medium. Pr.: ART 400.

    ART 545. Twentieth Century Art History I. (3) I. Origins and development of twentieth century art from 1890 to 1914. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 550. Twentieth Century Art History II. (3) II. Origins and development of twentieth century art from 1914 to 1950. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    University General Education courseART 560. Art for the Exceptional Individual. (3) I, II. Using art concepts and activities to meet the needs of the mentally deficient, physically impaired, or emotionally disturbed. Adaptation will be based upon art development of the intact individual. Three hours lec. Pr.: PSYCH 110. Same as EDCI 560.

    ART 565. Ceramics II. (3) I, II. Advanced work on potter's wheel combined with hand-built forms. Consideration of simple kiln design, firing techniques, and procedures using various fuel burning kilns. Six hours lab. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 265.

    ART 570. Oil Painting II. (3) I, II. Continuation of Oil Painting I. Emphasis on a more extensive understanding of concepts about painting which will lead to the development of a wider range of personal experience and expression. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 245.

    ART 575. Graphic Design: The Digital Environment. (3) I, II, S. Development and preparation of design concepts for application in the digital environment. World Wide Web documents/publications. CD-ROM, disk, and other presentation/delivery formats. Select topics in design. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 201 and 400.

    ART 576. Advanced Typography. (3) I, II, S. Typographic theory and use exploring formal and informal structures with an analysis of historic styles from the Dadaists through current typographic concepts. Multi-page layouts emphasized. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 201 and 290.

    ART 577. Graphic Design and Illustration III. (Workshop-Matrix) (3) I, II, S. Students selected by portfolio review, design projects to client specifications. May be repeated. Pr.: ART 576 or consent of instructor.

    ART 580. Graphic Design Senior Studio. (3) I, II, S. Directed senior thesis project, portfolio and resume preparation. Selected topics in design. Six hours lab. Pr.: Instructor's permission (may be repeated once). ART 576.

    ART 582. Internships in Graphic Design. (1-3) I, II, S. The student works with the supervision of faculty and an appointed professional. Emphasis is on the development of approaches to problem solving and strengthening related skills in visual communications within a professional setting. May be repeated for up to 9 hours credit. Pr.: ART 575 and consent of instructor.

    ART 583. Graphic Design Professional Practices Seminar. (2) I, II. Professional design management, ethics, setting up a business, client/designer relationships, contractual options, billing practices, and operating procedures. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 576.

    ART 590. Approaches to Art Therapy. (3) I, II, S. Supervised studies in research relating to the art therapy profession, its current developments, and goals. Pr.: ART 560 or junior standing in a program that emphasizes work with special population groups and consent of instructor.

    ART 595. Independent Study in Art Therapy. (1-5) I, II, S. This course offers students who have fulfilled the full sequence of art therapy course work an opportunity for individual advanced study. Area of research to be selected by the student under the advisement of the instructor. Pr.: ART 560, 590 and consent of the instructor.

    ART 602. 20th Century Art History III. (3) I, II. Art movements beginning with abstract expressionism and continuing through pop, op, minimal, and conceptual art movements up to 1980. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 603. 20th Century Art History IV. (3) I, II, S. The art movements of the 1980s beginning with photo-realism and continuing through pattern and decoration, new image art, neo-expressionism, and neo-abstraction. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 604. Greek Art History. (3) I, II. The art of classical Greece, from its Aegean origins through the Hellenistic period. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 608. Special Studies in Art. (1-6) I, II. Specialized workshops or seminars conducted in studio, art therapy, art education, or art history. Pr.: Three credit hours in the relevant area.

    ART 612. Renaissance Art History. (3) I, II. Renaissance art of northern and southern Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with a brief discussion of its fourteenth century origins. Pr.: ART 195 or ART 196.

    ART 622. Baroque Art History. (3) I, II. The development of the baroque period in northern and southern Europe, from its beginnings in the early seventeenth century to the rococo style of the eighteenth century. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 626. Independent Study—Photography. (Var.) I, II. Advanced work in photography, an emphasis on personal development. Competency in camera and photo-related processes required. Pr.: ART 295.

    ART 628. Foreign Studies in Art History. (1-6) I, II, S. Participation in art history study abroad. Pr.: Three credit hours of art history and consent of instructor.

    ART 630. Foreign Studies in Studio Art. (1-6) I, II, S. Participation in studio art study abroad. Pr.: Three credit hours of studio art and consent of instructor.

    ART 632. The Development of American Art. (3) I, II. American art from the Colonial period to the beginnings of abstract expressionism in the early 1940s, with major emphasis on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century developments. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 634. History of Modern Sculpture. (3) I, II. Directions in sculpture since the time of Rodin. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 642. Nineteenth Century Art History. (3) I, II. Painting, sculpture, and architecture of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with emphasis on the art of France. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 654. Women in Art. (3) I, II. The work of women artists from early Middle Ages to the twentieth century, with emphasis on the contemporary period. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 662. Southwestern Indian Arts and Culture. (3) I, II. The development of southwestern Indian silversmithing, weaving, pottery, basketry, and painting from the prehistoric period through the twentieth century. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    Undergraduate and graduate credit
    ART 600. Advanced Drawing. (1-5. Credits over 3 hours must be approved by the instructor.) I, II. Upper-level drawing, development, and personal motivation. Lectures and problems directed toward an understanding of the historical development of drawing as well as investigations of contemporary attitudes. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 225, 240.

    ART 601. Graphic Design History/Theory/Criticism. (3) I, II. Significant works from late nineteenth century to the present to provide understanding of the development and character of graphic design, artists, and designers. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 576.

    ART 610. Figure Drawing II. (3) I, II. Continuation of Figure Drawing I, with emphasis on individual expression. Six hours lab. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 225.

    ART 615. Figure Painting. (3) I, II. Painting from the human figure with oil and plastic media. Six hours lab. May be taken for two semesters. Pr.: ART 245, 610.

    ART 620. Water Media II. (3) I, II. Upper-level painting with emphasis on individual expression in water-based media, acrylic watercolor, gouache. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 220.

    ART 623. Advanced Concepts in Computer Art and Design. (3) I, II, S. Advanced level studio exploration of computers as a tool/medium for art disciplines. Two hours lec., four hours lab. a week. Pr.: ART 200, 400, and instructor permission.

    ART 624. Photography Art Direction. (3) I, II. Relationship of photography to graphic design. Art direction of photographs, photograms, and related darkroom experimentation. Students must have a camera with adjustable shutter speeds and lens opening. Six hours lab. Pr.: ART 290.

    ART 625. Independent Study-Art Education. (1-5) I, II, S. Work offered in art education after competency has been achieved. Personal development is emphasized. Pr.: Full sequence of courses related to art education subject matter.

    ART 631. Contemporary Media Seminar. (3) I, II. A review of current trends in contemporary media and visual communication. Studio/lec. Pr.: ART 400.

    ART 635. Printmaking II. (3) I, II. Advanced work in blockprints, serigraphy, lithography, and intaglio. Six hours lab. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 235.

    ART 645. Sculpture II. (3) I, II. Emphasis on artistic development through exploratory experiences in the various media. Advanced woodworking processes, mold making, foundry techniques, and welding processes. Six hours lab. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 230.

    ART 650. Advanced Painting III. (3-6) I, II. Continuation of Painting II. Emphasis on individual directions in painting to attain personal expression and competency. Primarily for undergraduate painting majors. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 220, 245, 570 or 620.

    ART 655. Metalsmithing Techniques. (3) I, II. Surface embellishment, container construction of various techniques, linkage, and mechanical problems will be explored in addition to stone setting. Six hours lab. May be taken for three semesters. Pr.: ART 270.

    ART 660. Sculpture III. (1-5) I, II. Continuation of Sculpture II. Further exploration of media and technique, emphasizing the development of individual direction and expression. Primarily for undergraduate sculpture majors. May be taken for four semesters. Pr.: ART 645.

    ART 665. Ceramics III. (1-5) I, II. Individual exploration and further development of ceramic design and glaze technology; continuation of kiln design and construction. Six hours lab. May be taken for three semesters. Pr.: ART 565.

    ART 675. History of Ceramics. (3) I, II. History and development of ceramics; study of the use of pottery and other aspects of ceramics from earliest known records to present day. Use of slides and other visual materials. Pr.: ART 195 or 196.

    ART 680. Metals Workshop. (1-5) I, II. A number of metalsmithing techniques will be explored by the upper division student with emphasis on experimental problems and possibilities. The development of an individual point of view will predominate throughout the course. May be repeated twice. Pr.: ART 655.

    ART 685. Advanced Independent Study Design. (Var.) I, II, S. Advanced work in design-related subjects. Pr.: Full sequence of courses related to problem subject matter.

    ART 690. Techniques in Teaching Art. (Var.) I. Lectures and class discussion of methods, consideration of suitable laboratory equipment, use of illustrative material, and preparation of courses of study. Pr.: Twelve hours in art or consent of instructor.

    ART 695. Topics in Art History. (Var.) I, II, S. Independent exploration in selected problems in art history. Pr.: Twelve hours art history.

    Topics within Arts and Sciences:
    dMajors and Degrees dAerospace Studies dMathematics
    dDegree Requirements dAnthropology dMilitary Science
    dBachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sciences dArt dModern Languages
    dBachelor of Fine Arts dBiochemistry dMusic
    dBachelor of Music dBiology dPhilosophy
    dBachelor of Music Education dChemistry dPhysics
    dAssociate of Arts at Fort Riley dEconomics dPolitical Science
    dAssociate of Science at Fort Riley dEnglish dPsychology
    dProgram Options dGeography dSociology, Anthropology, and Social Work
    dAdvising dGeology dSpeech Communication, Theatre, and Dance
    dUniversity Undergraduate Studies dHistory dStatistics
    dPre-Law dJournalism and Mass Communications   
    dPre-Health Professions Program dKinesiology   
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    Kansas State University
    November 10, 2000