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Kansas State University

Architecture

David Sachs, Interim Head

Rebecca Stark, Academic Advisor

Professors Coates, Condia, Hoag, Jones, Krstic, McNamara, Norris-Baker, Sachs, Seamon, Siepl-Coates, C. Watts, and D. Watts; Associate Professors Arens, Charney, Knox, Norheim, Ornelas, Selfridge, Simic, Simon, and Streeter; Assistant Professors Bowne, Chambers, Gabbard, Howe, Middlebrook, Rhodes, and Spaw; Adjunct Professors Barucchieri, Bowman, Hoffman, Mayo, Nelson, Singleton, and Seligson; Emeriti: Professors Christensen, Ernst, Fischer, Foerster, Kremer, Krider, Sanner, Slack, Stotesbury, and Wendt.

E-mail: architecture@ksu.edu

www.arch.ksu.edu/arch

Philosophy statement

The program prepares students to enter the profession of architecture, a career that is characterized by change and diversity. Design is at the center of a professional and critical discourse reinforced by liberal studies. A body of artistic, theoretical, social and technical knowledge, understanding, and skill— a background that all architects share—is offered as the basis for the development of individual interests and aptitudes.

As part of the Department of Architecture's goal of promoting a socially and environmentally aware professional architect, the department requires a minimum of 18 university general education elective credits, of which at least 6 must be in courses numbered 300 or above. At least 15 must be outside the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. No more than two university general education courses may be taken in a single discipline.

Beginning students are encouraged to select specific introductory-level general education courses with the intention that they may develop a concentration in the arts, sciences, and/or humanities by taking advanced courses in their later years.

Special activities and programs

An integral part of the architecture curriculum is the opportunity, during the fourth year, to study abroad for a semester at our facility in Castiglion Fiorentino or Orvieto, Italy. Students have also studied in the Czech Republic, England, Finland, France, Denmark, and Australia.

Each spring third-year students spend a week in Chicago or Los Angeles studying those cities' rich architecture and urban design heritage. Fourth-year students may elect to participate in architectural internships in professional offices in the United States and abroad.

An accredited degree

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degrees: the bachelor of architecture and the master of architecture. A program may be granted a six-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

Master's degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre- professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The architecture degree offered by Kansas State University is an NAAB-accredited professional degree.

Computer applications

The department recognizes digital technology as a valuable asset and is committed to offering access to a variety of opportunities for students to develop their computer skills and understanding.

For updated information regarding recommended computer platforms and software, contact the department.

Architecture program

It is important to refer to the college website for current information regarding this program. This curriculum is subject to constant review and change without notice. Students should obtain a copy of the current curriculum when they enter the program.
 
For the curriculum requirements for the first two semesters, see Environmental Design Studies, earlier in this section.
 
Total hours required for graduation: 170
 
Third semester
ARCH 302Architectural Design Studio I5
ARCH 248Building Science3
ARCH 348Structural Systems in Architecture I3
ARCH 350History of Designed Environment III3
University general education elective*3
17
Supplemental study
Distributed electives***6
 
Fourth semester
ARCH 304Architectural Design Studio II5
ARCH 325Environmental Design and Society3
ARCH 413Environmental Systems in Architecture I4
ARCH 449Structural Systems in Architecture II3
ENGL 200Expository Writing 23
18
 
Fifth semester
ARCH 403Architectural Design Studio III5
ARCH 433Building Construction Systems in Architecture3
ARCH 452Structural Systems in Architecture III3
ARCH 472Computing in Architecture3
University general education elective*3
17
 

Sixth semester

ARCH 404Architectural Design Studio IV5
ARCH 453Structural Systems in Architecture IV3
ARCH 514Environmental Systems in Architecture II3
LAR 500Site Planning and Design3
University general education elective*3
17
 

Seventh semester

ARCH 605Architectural Design Studio V5
ARCH 515Environmental Systems in Architecture III3
ARCH 650Architectural Programming3
Planning elective**3
University general education elective   (300 level and above)*3
17
 

Eigth semester

ARCH 606Architectural Design Studio VI5
Professional support electives**9
14
or
ARCH 505Architecture Internship Part A11
ARCH 506Architecture Internship Part B3
14
 

Ninth semester

ARCH 806Architecture Design Studio VII5
ARCH 805Project Programming2
Architecture seminar**3
Professional support elective**3
University general education elective   (300 level and above)*3
16
 

Tenth semester

ARCH 807Architecture Design Studio VIII5
ARCH 853Professional Practice3
Professional support elective**3
Architecture seminar**6
17
 
*A minimum of 18 university general education (UGE) elective credits must be taken, of which at least 6 must be in courses numbered 300 or above. Of these 18 UGE credits, 3 credits may be taken within the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. None, however, can be in a student's major field. No more than two UGE courses may be taken in a single discipline. UGE courses must be taken at K-State. Transfer credits may reduce the number of lower-level UGE courses required; see sliding scale available at http://www.ksu.edu/catl/uge/welc3.htm#trans. Students who participate in study abroad programs approved by K-State will meet UGE credit at the 300 level upon successful completion of the program.
 
**The MArch degree requires 27 hours of professional support electives. Of these 27 credits, at least 3 hours must be planning elective credits, and at least 9 hours must be architecture seminar credits as defined in the advising handbook. In addition, 9 of the 27 credits must be taken in support of the student's area of concentration as defined in the advising handbook. These 9 hours may include credits taken to fulfill the planning and seminar requirements.
 
***Distributed electives are defined in the advising handbook and must be taken outside the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design. They may be taken any time prior to or during the architecture program.

Architecture courses

University General Education courseARCH 240. Science, Technology, and Architecture. (3) I, II. An exploration of the interrelationships between architecture and various sciences including the technological applications of selected scientific theories.

ARCH 248. Building Science. (3) I. Instruction in the materials of building and landscape design; sources, characteristics and uses in design and construction; emphasis on evaluation and selection. Two lectures and one recitation per week. Pr.: Second-year standing and PHYS 115 or 113.

University General Education courseARCH 290. Architecture Through the Ages. (3) I, II. An introductory survey of the history of architecture worldwide from its prehistoric beginnings up to the present day. May not be taken for credit by students enrolled in the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design.

University General Education courseARCH 301. Appreciation of Architecture. (3) I, II, S. An analysis of the evolution of architectural styles to determine the relation of architectural expression to the needs of society. Three hours rec. a week. May not be taken for credit by students enrolled in the architecture, landscape architecture, or interior architecture curricula.

ARCH 302. Architectural Design Studio I. (5) I. Instruction in architectural design focusing on the application of elements and principles of form and space in design. Instruction in the use of techniques for visually representing design ideas. Pr.: Admission to the architecture program and DSFN202.

ARCH 303. Architectural Design Studio 1A. (6) I. This course integrates material from Environmental Design Studio I and II with ADS I. Twelve hours of studio a week. Pr.: For transfer students; 9 or more credit hours of graphics, design, and freehand drawing and enrollment in the Department of Architecture.

ARCH 304. Architectural Design Studio II. (5) II. Instruction in architectural design focusing on the synthesis of basic social, functional, technical, and aesthetic factors in design. Continued instruction in techniques for visually representing design ideas. Pr.: ARCH 302.

ARCH 325. Environmental Design and Society. (3) II. Instruction in behavioral, cultural, and ecological factors that contribute to successful environmental design; considers how the design process is affected by a conceptual point of view. Case studies from architecture, landscape architecture, interior architecture, and interior design. Three hours lecture a week. Pr.: Second-year standing or permission of instructor.

ARCH 348. Structural Systems in Architecture I. (3) I. Introduction to statics; force analysis and the study of forces in equilibrium; principles of statics as applied to the study of simple elemental structures; the origin, the nature, and the action of loads on structural systems. Instruction in the use of statics in the preliminary stages of building design. Three hours lecture, two hours recitation a week. Pr.: PHYS 113 or 115, MATH 100 or higher.

ARCH 350. History of the Designed Environment III. (3) I. The history of the designed environment from the mid-18th century through present. Pr.: ENVD 251 or permission of instructor.

ARCH 403 and ARCH 404. Architectural Design Studio III and IV. Relation of structures to their environment; client and community restraint; development of building programs; synthesis of functional, technical, and aesthetic considerations in the design of structures for human use. Twelve hours studio a week.

ARCH 403. Architectural Design Studio III. (5) I. Pr.: ARCH 304 and not more than one D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 404. Architectural Design Studio IV. (5) II, S. Pr.: ARCH 403 and not more than one D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 413. Environmental Systems in Architecture I. (4) II. Instruction in bioclimatic and ecological design principles as a basis for architectural and landscape design. Emphasis on passive solar heating and cooling and daylighting. Three hours lecture and one hour recitation a week. Pr.: PHYS 113 or 115, MATH 100 or higher, and enrollment in a professional program in the college.

ARCH 433. Building Construction Systems in Architecture. (3) I. A lecture course that develops an understanding of how materials and systems assembly reinforce and extend the intentions of the designer as well as an understanding of the strategies and techniques for integration and coordination of the building components. Pr.: ARCH 248, 348, and admission to a professional program in the college. Three hours lec. per week.

ARCH 449. Structural Systems in Architecture II. (3) II. Instruction in strength of materials focusing on the behavior of building materials under loading; their ability to resist deformation and failure. Instruction in sizing simple structural elements. Three hours lecture, two hours recitation a week. Pr.: ARCH 348.

ARCH 452. Structural Systems in Architecture III. (3) I. Instruction in the design of building structures as whole systems. Instruction in the principles of structural subsystem design; emphasis on the overall structural behavior and subsystems integrity required to achieve a variety of building forms. Instruction in strategies for the use of approximation in the manipulation of key quantitative properties of whole systems and major subsystems in building design. Three hours lecture, two hours workshop/test each week. Pr.: ARCH 449.

ARCH 453. Structural Systems in Architecture IV. (3) II. Instruction in the design of building structures as whole systems; overall-to-specific systems behavior and manipulative design of major subsystems. Emphasis on the design of subsystems and subsystem components as they are affected by structural material. Instruction in specialized issues associated with the analysis and design of high rise and long-span building structure, including foundation, constructive, and economic factors which affect building design. Three hours lecture, two hours workshop/test each week. Pr.: ARCH 452.

ARCH 472. Computer Applications in Architecture. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to technical, representational, and theoretical issues of digital design tools in architecture. Acquisition of skills to independently employ three- dimensional design, modeling, rendering, image processing, two-dimensional drawing, and other applications. Students are strongly encouraged to provide their own portable computers and software. Two hours of lec. and two hours of lab per week. Pr.: Enrollment in one of the degree-granting programs of the college.

ARCH 475. Problems in Architectural Presentation. (Var.) I, II, S. Study of various methods of graphically representing architectural problems to develop professional office techniques. Pr.: Second-year standing and approval of instructor.

ARCH 505. Architectural Internship, Part A. (11) II. Thirty weeks off-campus work study program with an approved professional, building industry, government, or non-profit agency sponsor. Must be enrolled concurrently with ARCH 506, and each course must be successfully completed before credit is awarded in either. This course is graded CR/NCR only and is not for graduate credit. Pr.: ARCH434, ARCH 605, not more than one D in an architectural design course, and approval of the internship coordinator.

ARCH 506. Architectural Internship, Part B. (3) II. Preparation of internship journals and employer profiles during the approved 30-week off-campus work-study program in ARCH 505, and preparation of an internship analysis paper during the first semester after ARCH 505. Must be enrolled concurrently with ARCH 505, and each course must be successfully completed before credit is awarded in either. This course is letter-graded only and is not for graduate credit. Pr.: ARCH434, ARCH 605, not more than one D in an architectural design course, and approval of the internship coordinator.

ARCH 514 and ARCH 515. Environmental Systems in Architecture II and III. (3 each) Criteria for selection and application of natural and mechanical environmental control systems in architecture. Focus on the integration of thermal, illumination, sanitary, movement, and acoustical systems with the building fabric and the natural environment. Contemporary and developing approaches are explored. Three hours lec. a week.

ARCH 514. Environmental Systems in Architecture II. (3) II. Pr.: ARCH 413.

ARCH 515. Environmental Systems in Architecture III. (3) I. Pr.: ARCH 413.

ARCH 566. Problems in Architecture Design. (Var) S. Study of specific design problems under the direct supervision of a member of the architectural faculty. Pr.: Approval of instructor.

ARCH 601. Topics in History of the Designed Environment. (3) I, II. For the concentrated study of a particular period or subject in the history of the built environment. Seminars, readings, discussions, and projects. May be taken by majors in the College of Architecture and Design for a total of 12 hours credit. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ARCH 350 or approval of instructor.

ARCH 605. Architectural Design Studio V. (5) I. A design studio that integrates a design project with design development, (including structural, mechanical, lighting, and movement systems) and construction documentation. Twelve hours studio a week. Pr.: ARCH 404 and not more than one grade of D in an architectural design course. LAR 500 or conc. enrollment in LAR 500, ARCH 433, ARCH 453, ARCH 514 and conc. enrollment in ARCH 515.

ARCH 606. Architectural Design Studio VI. (5) I, II. Continuation of ARCH 605. Increased complexity of function and space definition systems. Relating environmental technology to total design. Twelve hours studio a week. Pr.: ARCH 605 and not more than one grade of D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 655. Foreign Seminar. (Var.) I, II, S. Group observation of design examples (ancient or modern) of a selected region, conducted in situ, to study significant aspects of environment, culture, and technology as relating to design solutions.

ARCH 650. Architectural Programming. (3) I, II. An introductory course surveying the basic philosophies and methodologies for architectural programming; emphasis on the comparative evaluation of different strategies and their integration within the process of design. Pr.: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

ARCH 656. Preservation Documentation. (3) I,II. Investigation of existing buildings and their settings; documenting design qualities, history, materials, systems, construction techniques, landscape, and physical and functional changes over time, using Historic American Building Survey Standards. Pr.: Senior standing and proficiency in drafting.

ARCH 657. Preservation Principles. (3) I. Examination of theoretical and practical aspects of preservation; background and current issues; design considerations. Pr.: Senior standing or permission of instructor.

University General Education courseARCH 670. History of American Architecture and Allied Design I. (3) I. The history of American architecture including aspects of interior architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, and preservation. This course investigates how the built forms of various colonial settlers in America responded to a new environment and how a distinctive American culture eventually took shape by the end of the 1800s. Pr.: ENVD 250 and 251 or approval of the instructor.

University General Education courseARCH 671. History of American Architecture and Allied Design II. (3) II. The history of American architecture including some aspects of interior architecture, urban planning, landscape architecture, and preservation. This course surveys those distinctively American styles of design which originated in the late 1800s and traces their impact on world architecture and how outside influences shaped American design from that time period up to present. Emphasis is placed upon the interplay of formal and functional concerns in architectural design. Pr.: ENVD 250 and 251 or approval of the instructor.

ARCH 680. Development Analysis. (3) I, II. An examination of various development characteristics and components and their crucial interactive nature which leads toward success or failure of building and land development. Development factors investigated include: market analysis, location uses and users, cost/benefits, nonmonetary benefits, financial returns expected and needed, financial incentives for investors, and feedback into the design process. Pr.: Admission to the professional program.

ARCH 703. Environmental Aesthetics. (3) I, II. Problems involving aesthetics in areas related to student's major field. Three hours a week. Pr. : Senior standing in architecture, landscape architecture, interior architecture, urban design.

ARCH 704. Environmental Seminar. (Var.) I, II. Environmental systems related to human perception, reactions, and behavior. Pr.: Senior standing.

ARCH 705. Project Programming. (2) I, II. The development of a program for ARCH 707 Architectural Design VIII under the direction of a faculty member. Pr.: ARCH 505/506, ARCH 606, ARCH 650, and approval of the faculty committee.

ARCH 706. Architectural Design Studio VII. (5) I, II. Integration of the physiological, psychological, and sociological parameters in the design of environments. Analysis, programming, and planning problems, increased complexity of function and space definition systems. Relating environmental technology to total design. Twelve hours studio a week. Pr.: ARCH 606 or 505; and 506; ARCH434, ARCH 515, and ARCH 452, and not more than one D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 707. Architectural Design Studio VIII. (5) I, II. Development of the student's project programmed in ARCH 705, under the direction of a faculty committee. Project must demonstrate a high level of achievement in systematic and comprehensive thinking, application of resources, and communication of total process. Twelve hours studio a week. Pr.: ARCH 705, 706, and not more than one D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 710. Topics in Architectural Design Methods. (3) I, II. Intensive review of selected design methodologies, including systematic and computer-based approaches to problem definition and project design; emphasis upon the comparative evaluation of problem-solving strategies within the architectural design process. Pr.: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing.

ARCH 715. Theory of Design. (3) I, II. Analysis of theories and philosophies in the design professions, including those in related societal and technological fields. Pr.: Varies by instructor.

ARCH 716. Environmental Systems in Architecture. (3) I, II. Study of site-specific microenvironmental systems and the designed microenvironment about buildings. Exploration of their interaction and manipulation to meet human comfort requirements and achieve resource-efficient site and building design. Pr.: ARCH 413 and 403, or graduate standing.

ARCH 720. Environment and Behavior. (3) I, II. An introductory course investigating the relationship between human behavior and the design of the physical environment, identifying those basic psychological and social concepts which influence and are influenced by the built environment. Three hours lec. rec. a week. Pr.: Senior standing or permission of instructor.

ARCH 725. Architectural Research Methods. (3) I, II. An introductory course surveying the basic philosophies and methodologies of science and research as they apply to the field of architecture. Special emphasis will be placed on those methods appropriate for investigating human response to the built environment. Three hours lec./seminar a week. Pr.: Senior standing.

ARCH 730. Environment and Aging. (3) I, II. An exploration of the aging process related to those factors in the architecturally designed environment that hinder and facilitate successful adaptation by the aging individual. Three hours lec./seminar a week. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing.

ARCH 735. Topics in Building Construction Systems in Architecture. (1-4) I, II. Advanced study of the relationship of conceptual and/or technological factors of building construction to architecture. Pr.: ARCH434; or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

University General Education courseARCH 740. Building-Related Health and Safety. (3) I, II. Multidisciplinary concepts and applications of building-related health and safety in the design, construction, and operations of residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Three hours: Initially lec./rec. followed by fieldwork analysis, documentation, and reporting. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing.

ARCH 752. Structural Systems in Architecture V. (Var.) I, II. Study of the relationship of conceptual and/or technological factors of structure to architectural design in more depth, or in a broader context of form-determining interactions than that presented in ARCH 452 and ARCH 453. Pr.: ARCH 453.

ARCH 753. Professional Practice. (3) I. Studies of conventional and newly developing methods of professional design practice. Instruction in the relationships of architects, landscape architects, interior architects and other professions to users, clients, construction industry, society, government, and one another. Two hours lecture and one hour recitation. Pr.: ARCH 433.

ARCH 765. Problems in Architecture. (Var.) I, II, S. A study of specific architectural problems under the direction of a member of the department staff. Pr.: Approval of instructor.

ARCH 801. Topics in History of the Designed Environment. (3) I, II. Seminar on topics involving specific periods or subjects in the history of the built environment. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: ARCH 350 or graduate standing.

ARCH 803. Environmental Aesthetics. (3) I, II. Problems involving aesthetics in areas related to student's major field. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing.

ARCH 804. Topics in Environment and Behavior. (3) I, II. Seminar on topics in human perceptions, reactions, and behavior as they relate to physical environments. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing.

ARCH 805. Project Programming. (2) I, II. Development of an architectural program for ARCH 807. Identify evaluation criteria and prepare statement of objectives; perform appropriate research and analysis; and create programming document. Pr.: ARCH 650; ARCH 606 or 505/506.

ARCH 806. Architecture Design Studio VII. (5) I, II. Analysis, programming, architectural, and planning problems with projects of increasing complexity of function and space definition systems. Integration of the physiological, psychological, and sociological parameters in the design of environments as well as relating structures and environmental technology to total design. Pr: ARCH 606 or 505/506, 515, and 453, and not more than one D in an architectural design course.

ARCH 807. Architectural Design Studio VIII. (5) I, II. Final design-studio course in the professional curriculum in architecture. Using the program established in ARCH 805, demonstrate mastery in systematic and comprehensive thinking, project research, application of resources, architectural design, and communication of total process. Pr.: ARCH 805 and 806.

ARCH 811. Topics in Architectural Design Methods. (3) I, II. Intensive review of selected design methodologies, including systematic and computer-based approaches to problem definition and project design; emphasis upon the comparative evaluation of problem-solving strategies within the architectural design process. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: ARCH 304 or graduate standing.

ARCH 815. Topics in Architecture. (3) I, II. Seminar on topics in architecture with readings, class discussion, student presentations, research papers, or projects. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr: ARCH 304 or graduate standing.

ARCH 816. Topics in Environmental Systems in Architecture. (3) I, II. A concentrated study of a particular subject related to the environmental systems of the built environment. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: ARCH 413 or graduate standing.

ARCH 820. Environment and Behavior. (3) I, II. An introductory course investigating the relationship between human behavior and the design of the physical environment, identifying those basic psychological and social concepts that influence and are influenced by the built environment. Pr.: Junior or graduate standing.

ARCH 831. Environment and Aging. (3) I, II. An exploration of the aging process related to those factors in the architecturally designed environment that hinder and facilitate successful adaptation by the aging individual. Pr.: Senior or graduate standing.

ARCH 835. Topics in Building Construction Systems in Architecture. (1-4) I, II. Advanced study of the relationship of conceptual and/or technological factors of building construction to architecture. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: ARCH 433 or graduate standing.

ARCH 840. Building-Related Health and Safety. (3) I, II. Multidisciplinary concepts and applications of building-related health and safety in the design, construction, and operations of residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Includes fieldwork analysis, documentation, and reporting. Pr.: Junior or graduate standing.

ARCH 852. Topics in Structural Systems in Architecture. (3) I, II. Study of the relationship of conceptual and/or technological factors of structure to architectural design. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Pr.: ARCH 453 or graduate standing.

ARCH 853. Professional Practice. (3) I, II. Studies of conventional and newly developing methods of professional design practice. Instruction in the relationships of architects, landscape architects, interior architects, and other professions to users, clients, construction industry, society, government, and one another. Pr.: ARCH 433.

ARCH 870. History of American Architecture and Allied Design I. (3) I. The history of American architecture including aspects of interior architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, and preservation. This course investigates how the built forms of various colonial settlers in America responded to a new environment and how a distinctive American culture eventually took shape by the end of the 1800s. Pr.: ARCH 350 or graduate standing.

ARCH 871. History of American Architecture and Allied Design II. (3) II. The history of American architecture including some aspects of interior architecture, urban planning, landscape architecture, and preservation. This course surveys those distinctively American styles of design that originated in the late 1800s and traces their impact on world architecture and how outside influences shaped American design from that time period up to present. Emphasis is placed upon the interplay of formal and functional concerns in architectural design. Pr.: ARCH 350 or graduate standing.

ARCH 880. Development Analysis. (3) I, II. An examination of various development characteristics and components and their crucial interactive nature which leads toward success or failure of building and land development. Development factors investigated include: market analysis, location uses and users, cost/benefits, non-monetary benefits, financial returns expected and needed, financial incentives for investors, and feedback into the design process. Pr.: Admission to the professional program or graduate standing.